Help me propagate a red JM in August

Rivian

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This is about the tiny leaf JM I found. 1.4m tall, upright, non-dissected red leaves.
Well I found the nursery it was bought from, went there and they didnt have it there and couldnt even name the cultivar.
I want to get my claws on this already xD
So one way or another I will attempt to propagate it now.
Airlayer is out of the question since its a street tree in a planter.
Theres also no seeds on it and it may not come true from those anyway.
So I guess Im left with cuttings, grafting, or budding, whatever that is.
What should I do? And how do you recommend I do it?


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I'm not sure what kind of luck you'll have, but I would try just taking general cuttings. Dip the cut ends in a good rooting hormone and plant in some well draining seedling soil. Keep it warm and humid and maybe it will root in time to build up strength before dormancy.
 

Rivian

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I'm not sure what kind of luck you'll have, but I would try just taking general cuttings. Dip the cut ends in a good rooting hormone and plant in some well draining seedling soil. Keep it warm and humid and maybe it will root in time to build up strength before dormancy.
Yeah, and Ive just read atropurpureum roots from cuttings and thats the closest cultivar I can think of. Worth a try. Will use inorganic free-draining mix in a semi-greenhouse.
 

penumbra

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Seems a bit late in the year, at least in my climate and I am not certain of yours. Rooting them now it will be dicey to get them through the winter I believe. I am speaking of my climate.
 

RKatzin

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You will do better taking cuttings in spring through early summer. That's when the tree is producing it's most exuberant growth and you have the most time for the cutting to develop a good root. Taking them now they may not root at all and if they do they won't be strong enough to make it through winter.
You want to catch the tree when it's upwardly mobile. Trees slow down in August and begin the decline into dormancy in September and October. The lifecycle of the tree at this time is not conducive to taking cuttings as the tree is not generating growth hormones at this time or very little.
 

HorseloverFat

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I get decent hardwood deciduous results in early fall...

For semi-hardwood, I have had best results in late spring....

However.. i have some “circumstantial” cuttings that I have in A “mixed, hodgepodge, darwinian cutting tray” which have been placed in the last two weeks...

So I, obviously, think it’s “worth a shot”.. as I am attempting a similar “shot” as well.
 

Rivian

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I get decent hardwood deciduous results in early fall...

For semi-hardwood, I have had best results in late spring....

However.. i have some “circumstantial” cuttings that I have in A “mixed, hodgepodge, darwinian cutting tray” which have been placed in the last two weeks...

So I, obviously, think it’s “worth a shot”.. as I am attempting a similar “shot” as well.
Do you defoliate your hardwood deciduous early fall cuttings?
Also, figs and willows dont count xD
 

HorseloverFat

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Hehe!!! I don’t have ficus ‘round these parts.. and yes.. you can sling a turd at willow cuttings and they’ll root..🤣🤣

It’s touch and go, how i’ve handled the leaves... ...it depends how THEY are handling it... on Acers and Prunus.. they seem to handle it until normal leaf drop..while Crabapple leaves where plucked very shortly after collection...
(I’d have MORE examples.. if I had had MORE success.. 🤣🤣but last fall I didn’t know as much as I know now... JUST like “tomorrow” holds more knowledge than today.. 🤓🤓🤓🤓)

I’m excited for “trials” THIS fall!!
 

Rivian

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I made maybe 30 cuttings of current years growth, left almost all the leaves on since theyre small and I think my last cuttings didnt root in time because there was too little foliage.
Used perlite vermiculite mix, in a transparent box. Covered with glass sheet but left a 1 inch gap for fresh air and against greenhouse effect heat. Covered glass in 1mm fine sand to protect from direct sunlight but let scattered light pass.
Put the setup outside in full sun.
Edit:
Forgot to say I used expired rooting powder on 80% of the cuttings (all I have right now), and theyre mostly cleaned up heel cuttings
 

HorseloverFat

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I made maybe 30 cuttings of current years growth, left almost all the leaves on since theyre small and I think my last cuttings didnt root in time because there was too little foliage.
Used perlite vermiculite mix, in a transparent box. Covered with glass sheet but left a 1 inch gap for fresh air and against greenhouse effect heat. Covered glass in 1mm fine sand to protect from direct sunlight but let scattered light pass.
Put the setup outside in full sun.
Edit:
Forgot to say I used expired rooting powder on 80% of the cuttings (all I have right now), and theyre mostly cleaned up heel cuttings

Sounds like their in a “positive environment”... Well taken care of....

In my experience.. “heel cuttings” take a tad longer, but produce more adventitious roots WHEN they strike..(could be wrong..this is just from MY experience) :)

I believe you will have success.

🤓
 

RKatzin

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Here's my take on cuttings. It's very easy to keep a cut twig alive. Until it begins to make new growth it's not a viable cutting. If it goes into dormancy without making some new growth it probably won't come out of dormancy in spring. Often they will do a false start, where they pop a couple of leaves and then stall out and just sit there until it gets hot and they expire. Cuttings taken after July don't have enough time to root and begin to make active growth, in other words start to behave like a tree and not a cutting. Most of them won't make it through winter and if they do they are so weakened they fail in the heat. Would have been better left to winter on the tree and taken as a fresh cutting in spring.
I'm off grid. No power lines here so I can't run a bank of lights and heaters all winter. I have to work within the parameters of the elements. I'm not production, but I make a few dozen cuttings every year, deciduous and conifers, just because I can. They're called hookers and I use them to hook wannabes. The old first one is free scam. Go on take the tree, it's free and I made it myself. Just for you. Go on take it home. And bam! Another wannabe becomes a bonsai addict. Baited, hooked and landed!
 

Forsoothe!

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This is a fool's errand this late in the year. The roots developed won't be sufficient to live through Germany's mild winters.
 

Rivian

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A few have died, but most have survived. They callused enough to absorb some moisture and not rot. But I kinda cooked them in the sun a bit when I started (greenhouse effect), so some leaves turned brown and were dropped. And now its getting Fall. Im considering buying a growth light and taking them indoors to force them to keep photosynthesising for a few weeks and build up energy to root before dormancy. Or, let them go dormant and wake them up very early, also using growth lights.
 

leatherback

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A few have died, but most have survived. They callused enough to absorb some moisture and not rot. But I kinda cooked them in the sun a bit when I started (greenhouse effect), so some leaves turned brown and were dropped. And now its getting Fall. Im considering buying a growth light and taking them indoors to force them to keep photosynthesising for a few weeks and build up energy to root before dormancy. Or, let them go dormant and wake them up very early, also using growth lights.
I think I would just let them be for winter, and follow the normal cycle, but protect them from deep frost.
 

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