Help! My Serissa is not dying!

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Forgive me my twist of the all too common forum thread title.

After reading so many threads about how difficult Serrisa's are to cultivate, I decided to start work on a Shohin. I have found them to be relatively easy to cultivate, they respond well to bonsai techniques, and really don't seem to mind being neglected most the time, which leads me to believe that most problems people have with Serrissa's is over-caring for them.

This is the Shohin Serissa, still has some work left to be done on it, maybe next year. It is four inches tall and I have been training it for about a year and a half now.



Will
 

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Bonsai Nut

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I only had trouble with serissas when I kept them indoors. Typical indoor issues - root rot, fungus, etc. Probably compounded by the fact that my house didn't get a lot of direct sunlight through the windows. I stopped keeping them years ago - they just didn't hold my interest.
 
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Yes, this one is more of a novelity than anything else, living in Michigan, I have limited room for tropicals as they need indoor space a good portion of the year, so they make up a very small percentage of my bonsai.

This one appeals to me, so it gets bench space, those that don't end up as gifts or on the vendor table. ;)


Will
 

Smoke

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Get any blooms on this one Will? Or...are you like me and keep all the bloom wood trimmed back:eek:

ak
 
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Get any blooms on this one Will? Or...are you like me and keep all the bloom wood trimmed back:eek:

ak
No, nothing to please the eyes to date, I keep it pretty well sheared back. Maybe after the desired shape is finally achived, I'll see if it will do me the honor of pushing forth a few flowers.


Will
 

Tachigi

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Help! My Serissa is not dying!
I give me 60 seconds Will and I can find some people to rectify your problem ;)
 

Rick Moquin

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Any thoughts on flatening the branches out and developing it as a sarengetti vice a broom? The trunk would lend itself better to the former IMO. Not much work to make it look credidble, the reason why I ask is that this shape (sarengetti) is under utilized. Regardless of which direction you take, it is well on it's way.
 
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Funny, Tom, most likely true, but still funny. ;)

Rick, excellent thought, do you know of where any good examples can be viewed?


Will
 

Rick Moquin

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Will,

The following link was a page from "google" that I had archived some time ago. There are many variables of the "serengetti" style trees but with the link you will indeed find one that will lends itself well to yours. I have a boxwood "koreana" that I intend to develop has a "serengetti" and is well on it's way. Your tree will require but a slight styling adjustment to be a convincing one.
 

Vance Wood

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In fact Will; this Serrisa is a fine little tree. Most of the suggestions have been about the pot and the slight changes necessary to fit a particular style. Most of the time with the standard Serrisa post we find the kind of replys like: Nice little tree. Let it grow and you will see some flowers. Keep it evenly moist (a good idea incidentally) . This is the firtst Serrisa I have seen that looks like it is worth the effort to make into a credible bonsai. Good job.
 
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In my humble opinion this pot is too big for this serissa..
I agree with you, the pot is too heavy for this tree. Once I have reached the point where I will start on refinement, then it will find itself in a slightly smaller pot. I see little sense in restricting root growth on a tree that is still in development, not to mention that Serrisas seem to like a little extra room, in my experience.

Thanks Hans,


Will
 
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This is the firtst Serrisa I have seen that looks like it is worth the effort to make into a credible bonsai. Good job.
Thanks Vance. I think you have seen this one before, at last years show, it was more detailed then.

I was serious though when I said that I think people tend to overcare for this species. I have found generally ignoring them and giving them a occassional hedge trim, works fine.

Al,

Is yours also a "Thousand Star"?


Will
 

bonsaibaka

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This is the funniest thread title yet!

Very nice Will. Is it from a cutting?

I don't see what all the fuss is about dying serissas. Mine has gone through sweltering heat, freezing cold, multiple moves, and just about every mistake a neophyte could make. It's never missed a beat!

I think you're right, they prefer a bit of neglect.

Regards,
Mike
 

Mellow Mullet

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Really nice and I like the direction that you are going with it. I,too, find serissa fairly easy to keep, at least hear in Alabama. I have several different species, one of my favorite trees.

John Lee
 

irene_b

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Your title scared me off even looking at this thread! LOL
I neglect mine and they do great....And yes mine flower!
Irene
 

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