Help Needed: Bud Identification

Dryad

Sapling
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Found an interesting looking stump beside my uncle's farm, but I'm having trouble identifying the species online. Any ideas judging by the buds?
20210207_152420.jpg

I took a photo of the trunk itself but for some reason it came out too blurry to make out... Here's a (poorly taken) pic of the branch structure from above.
20210207_152428.jpg
 

Shibui

Masterpiece
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Nice photo of a hand but out of focus buds make it hard to ID.
The bark and general growth makes me think Oak???
 

Lutonian

Shohin
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Alder or Common Alder – Alnus glutinosa

Common Alder, Alnus glutinosa, bark.
The bark of a mature Common Alder, Alnus glutinosa. Photo: Paul Kirtley
Alders are a common riverside tree and are often associated with water. They can be found alongside streams and in areas that flood (‘alder carrs’). Alders also grow in damper spots where water is not apparent on the surface. The Alder’s native range is throughout Britain, mainland Europe, extending south to north Africa and east to the Caucasus and northern Iran.

Alder buds are often mauve in colour and oblong or ‘club-shaped’ with a length of around 7mm (0.3 in), on a short grey, scaly stalk.

The bark of Alder is purplish brown in young trees, darkening with age to grey-brown. In older trees fissures appear and the bark becomes cracked, creating small vertical plates in old trees.

Mauve truncheon buds of Common Alder
 

eryk2kartman

Chumono
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Anyway, i think doesnt matter what it is now, you will find it out once leaves are out.
I would dig that one up if you have a plan for it......
 

Dryad

Sapling
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Thanks for the help folks, and yes apologies for the crappy photos.
Anyway, i think doesnt matter what it is now, you will find it out once leaves are out.
I would dig that one up if you have a plan for it......
The only catch is, I'd rather not dig it up unless I know it's suitable for bonsai.
 

Lutonian

Shohin
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I don't think its an English elm they spread by suckering seed is infertile, unless there is one near by. Ulmus minor comes in many flavors (English elm is a cultivar of ulmus minor). They are robust trees that take a lot of abuse and there lots of variation in the species rough leaf/smooth leaf etc.
 

badatusernames

Chumono
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6XSEH4U.jpg
can’t for the life of me find the main ID thread

any ideas? growing next to my house and i’m about to get rid of it
 

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