Help Needed

Larrytx

Sapling
Messages
43
Reaction score
24
Location
North-Central Texas
USDA Zone
8
I have this Millettia japonica and the leaves are turning white. The soil is 1/3 pine bark, 1/3 decomposed granite and 1/3 gravel (3/8 in or smaller). I had it in a south window until Spring arrived. Our weather has been in the 70’s daytime and 50’s nighttime. It gets sun until late afternoon. I have not fertilized it and started using a moisture meter because I thought it might be chlorosis. The leaves continue to get worse as if they have been bleached out.
I will appreciate any help as to what I should do.
7F3EEFA2-A66C-427A-87D3-6A004213080F.jpeg
 

Paradox

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,917
Reaction score
7,810
Location
Long Island, NY
USDA Zone
7a
I am sorry, I am not familiar with this species enough to help much.

However if it is chlorosis there are some things that might be causing it:

  • a specific mineral deficiency in the soil, such as iron, magnesium or zinc
  • deficient nitrogen and/or proteins
  • a soil pH at which minerals become unavailable for absorption by the roots
  • poor drainage (waterlogged roots)
  • damaged and/or compacted roots
  • pesticides and particularly herbicides may cause chlorosis, both to target weeds and occasionally to the crop being treated.
  • exposure to sulphur dioxide - unlikely
  • ozone injury to sensitive plants - unlikely
  • presence of any number of bacterial pathogens, for instance Pseudomonas syringae pv. tagetis that causes complete chlorosis on Asteraceae. - unlikely if its been growing inside for a time
Since you have the plant there with you, you need to go through this list and see if any of these things listed are going on with your tree.
Granted some are harder to determine than others but the easier ones are probably the more likely

Some questions to answer are

How often do you water?
Have you just had this plant inside exclusively? For how long?
Did you just place this plant outside when it has been inside for a while?
If you did put it outside, did you place it directly on the ground or was it on a concrete patio or deck?
When is the last time it was repotted?
Did the change in color of the leaves seem to occur after you put it outside (if in fact you did) or some other thing you might have done to the plant?
 
Last edited:

ShadyStump

Masterpiece
Messages
2,469
Reaction score
3,584
Location
Southern Colorado, USA
USDA Zone
6a
Can you get us a more detailed look at some of the affected leaves? From here it looks like it might be powdery mildew, but I can't be certain from the pic.
Does the white rub off at all?
Are the leaves feeling papery and dry, or developing holes?

I know nothing of the species of tree, but powdery mildew is a big issue in my region, so when I see white on leaves I panic a bit.
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
Messages
31,796
Reaction score
43,678
Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
My thoughts went to PM too.

I'd strip the leaves and start afresh and avoid anything "japonica" in the future out of principal.(sp)

Sorce
 

Shibui

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,063
Reaction score
9,580
Location
Yackandandah, Australia
USDA Zone
9?
Not sure if Millettia are affected by mites but the mottled leaves are very similar to very bad mite infestation and they love indoor conditions. Check for very fine webbing under the leaves. Check with a good magnifying glass for live bugs under the leaves.
If no sign of mites then look at powdery mildew and then the list from @Paradox

I'd start feeding. It rarely hurts and if deficiency is a problem the sooner you start the quicker it will recover.
 

Larrytx

Sapling
Messages
43
Reaction score
24
Location
North-Central Texas
USDA Zone
8
I am sorry, I am not familiar with this species enough to help much.

However if it is chlorosis there are some things that might be causing it:

  • a specific mineral deficiency in the soil, such as iron, magnesium or zinc
  • deficient nitrogen and/or proteins
  • a soil pH at which minerals become unavailable for absorption by the roots
  • poor drainage (waterlogged roots)
  • damaged and/or compacted roots
  • pesticides and particularly herbicides may cause chlorosis, both to target weeds and occasionally to the crop being treated.
  • exposure to sulphur dioxide - unlikely
  • ozone injury to sensitive plants - unlikely
  • presence of any number of bacterial pathogens, for instance Pseudomonas syringae pv. tagetis that causes complete chlorosis on Asteraceae. - unlikely if its been growing inside for a time
Since you have the plant there with you, you need to go through this list and see if any of these things listed are going on with your tree.
Granted some are harder to determine than others but the easier ones are probably the more likely

Some questions to answer are

How often do you water?
Have you just had this plant inside exclusively? For how long?
Did you just place this plant outside when it has been inside for a while?
If you did put it outside, did you place it directly on the ground or was it on a concrete patio or deck?
When is the last time it was repotted?
Did the change in color of the leaves seem to occur after you put it outside (if in fact you did) or some other thing you might have done to the plant?
I water when the top 1/2” of the soil feels dry.
I’ve had the plant for about 4 months and it’s been inside until last week.
I placed the plant on the concrete patio.
I repotted the plant about 1 week after I got it.
The color started changing while it was inside.
Thanks
 

Larrytx

Sapling
Messages
43
Reaction score
24
Location
North-Central Texas
USDA Zone
8
Not sure if Millettia are affected by mites but the mottled leaves are very similar to very bad mite infestation and they love indoor conditions. Check for very fine webbing under the leaves. Check with a good magnifying glass for live bugs under the leaves.
If no sign of mites then look at powdery mildew and then the list from @Paradox

I'd start feeding. It rarely hurts and if deficiency is a problem the sooner you start the quicker it will recover.
Thank you. I moved it back indoors last night. I checked for bugs and found none.
 

Larrytx

Sapling
Messages
43
Reaction score
24
Location
North-Central Texas
USDA Zone
8
Not sure if Millettia are affected by mites but the mottled leaves are very similar to very bad mite infestation and they love indoor conditions. Check for very fine webbing under the leaves. Check with a good magnifying glass for live bugs under the leaves.
If no sign of mites then look at powdery mildew and then the list from @Paradox

I'd start feeding. It rarely hurts and if deficiency is a problem the sooner you start the quicker it will recover.
I don’t see mites or webbing. No mildew found. Thanks
 

penumbra

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,843
Reaction score
11,015
Location
Front Royal, VA
USDA Zone
6
I am surprised that it survived that long indoors. You are aware this plant is an outdoor plant? I have several of them and they spend no time at all indoors except when I rooted a few, then they went straight outdoors. I winter them here with virtually no winter protection and even my young cuttings in 3-1/2 inch pots survive fine. I have never had this experience with any of mine, but I do know they are suseptable to spider mite infestation.
 

Larrytx

Sapling
Messages
43
Reaction score
24
Location
North-Central Texas
USDA Zone
8
Can you get us a more detailed look at some of the affected leaves? From here it looks like it might be powdery mildew, but I can't be certain from the pic.
Does the white rub off at all?
Are the leaves feeling papery and dry, or developing holes?

I know nothing of the species of tree, but powdery mildew is a big issue in my region, so when I see white on leaves I panic a bit.
I will get a better photo posted. The leaves do not feel dry. I stripped the leaves and they came off very easily. The new growth stems are really green and looks healthy. Thank you
 

rockm

Spuds Moyogi
Messages
11,266
Reaction score
15,760
Location
Fairfax Va.
USDA Zone
7
I read your other post as well. The soil you have this plant in is FAR too lean for it. It needs more organics, like pine bark mulch, orchid bark etc. at about 40 percent (or even 50 percent). The plant is native in Asia to lowlands and hillsides where soil is richer and more fertile, (Similar to wisteria).

Its current condition to me looks like the leaves are dried out and pale because of overall lack of light and low humidity...
 

Larrytx

Sapling
Messages
43
Reaction score
24
Location
North-Central Texas
USDA Zone
8
I am surprised that it survived that long indoors. You are aware this plant is an outdoor plant? I have several of them and they spend no time at all indoors except when I rooted a few, then they went straight outdoors. I winter them here with virtually no winter protection and even my young cuttings in 3-1/2 inch pots survive fine. I have never had this experience with any of mine, but I do know they are suseptable to spider mite infestation.
I did not know they are an outdoor plant. Thank you. Since you have experience with these plants, do you know where I can get another one?
I wouldn't....
But you know....
Texas.

Sorce
You know more about bonsai than I do. I’ll hold off on the repotying.
 

rockm

Spuds Moyogi
Messages
11,266
Reaction score
15,760
Location
Fairfax Va.
USDA Zone
7
I did not know they are an outdoor plant. Thank you. Since you have experience with these plants, do you know where I can get another one?

You know more about bonsai than I do. I’ll hold off on the repotying.
Millettia is not common as a bonsai subject. To get another nursery plant starter (Which is what you have), just search local landscape nurseries.

An actual decent millettia bonsai will be harder to come by


 

Larrytx

Sapling
Messages
43
Reaction score
24
Location
North-Central Texas
USDA Zone
8
Millettia is not common as a bonsai subject. To get another nursery plant starter (Which is what you have), just search local landscape nurseries.

An actual decent millettia bonsai will be harder to come by


Thanks for the helpful information.
 

Larrytx

Sapling
Messages
43
Reaction score
24
Location
North-Central Texas
USDA Zone
8
Can you get us a more detailed look at some of the affected leaves? From here it looks like it might be powdery mildew, but I can't be certain from the pic.
Does the white rub off at all?
Are the leaves feeling papery and dry, or developing holes?

I know nothing of the species of tree, but powdery mildew is a big issue in my region, so when I see white on leaves I panic a bit.
0A43D335-D6C7-4E0B-B9E0-A8B2C0CE6CA5.jpeg
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom