Help Scott pick his keeper

Help Scott pick his keeper!

  • Tree 1

    Votes: 2 7.7%
  • Tree 2

    Votes: 14 53.8%
  • Tree 3

    Votes: 1 3.8%
  • Tree 4

    Votes: 5 19.2%
  • Tree 5

    Votes: 1 3.8%
  • Tree 6

    Votes: 2 7.7%
  • None of the above

    Votes: 1 3.8%

  • Total voters
    26
  • Poll closed .

markyscott

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OK -

In October I also collected six Water elm. Now Water elm are not really elm - they are Planera aquatic, a closely related species. These are the first Water elm I've collected. Zach Smith of Bonsai South knows more about these than anyone I know, but I'm anxious to learn about them. All but one will be donated to the club for a workshop the next time Houston hosts the state convention. I've left them tall for now - I imagine the lucky person in the workshop will cut the trunk lower. I've also left some multi-trunk options too. Where more than one front was obvious, I'll post multiple picture. The one that is not donated (assuming it lives) is going to be added to my bench. Now I've pretty much picked the one I want, but I thought it would be fun to put it to a vote. So I'll post the trees - you pick the keeper. None of the above is a choice. But please take the time to post what you liked about the tree you picked or why you didn't like any of them.

Scott
 
Last edited:

sorce

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I picked Six because I like the quick lean...and it seems to have the most usable low interest.

It would be nice to use those suckers too..
I like how they sit in the arch there...it looks like a safe place to grow.

I hope Zach pops by with some thoughts!

Cool. Very cool!

Sorce
 

markyscott

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I picked Six because I like the quick lean...and it seems to have the most usable low interest.

It would be nice to use those suckers too..
I like how they sit in the arch there...it looks like a safe place to grow.

I hope Zach pops by with some thoughts!

Cool. Very cool!

Sorce
It would be doubly good as he was on the collection trip with me. He wrote a blog post about fall Water elm collection about that trip, in fact. I've bought trees from him before, but it was the first time I met him. Great guy, but he had to leave before the after collection beverage. I guess he doesn't get as thirsty as us mortals.

Scott
 

markyscott

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#4. Now that tree has lived a hard life.
Yes sir - that's dead wood running up the trunk in the first picture. Also a dead stump on the lower right near soil level in the second picture. I don't know how punky dead wood gets in Water elm - but that's been dead awhile and this tree is completely underwater for months at a time.

- Scott
 

johng

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I am going to have to go with the tree 2. I like the movement and interplay between the three trunks. I would add that my decision may be greatly influenced by where these bud in the spring.

Taper seems to be one of the most difficult qualities to find in this species. Where I collect there are more Water Elms than BC....some with amazing movement but very very few with any kind of taper in the lower trunk.

I have always been curious about the logic of leaving collected D trees taller than needed....if they are apically dominate the majority of the buds will form above the future cut location...resulting in the need for a second drastic pruning. My experience leads me to believe that you might get a better and more usable bud break if you made a more reasonable first chop. (I do understand that in this case you are trying to leave choices for the workshop but I wonder if that is the best choice??)

Of course if you allowed the tree to recover long enough(3-5 years) it may be a moot point...you are just losing 3-5 years of development time.
 

LanceMac10

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For me, it was between #1 and #4. If you had good luck with your chops on #1, that's a nice start on a twin-trunk.
#4 gives more options, some surface roots on one side, lower branching to chop to and that interesting section of dead trunk.
So I selected #4.:cool:
 

markyscott

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I am going to have to go with the tree 2. I like the movement and interplay between the three trunks. I would add that my decision may be greatly influenced by where these bud in the spring.

Taper seems to be one of the most difficult qualities to find in this species. Where I collect there are more Water Elms than BC....some with amazing movement but very very few with any kind of taper in the lower trunk.

I have always been curious about the logic of leaving collected D trees taller than needed....if they are apically dominate the majority of the buds will form above the future cut location...resulting in the need for a second drastic pruning. My experience leads me to believe that you might get a better and more usable bud break if you made a more reasonable first chop. (I do understand that in this case you are trying to leave choices for the workshop but I wonder if that is the best choice??)

Of course if you allowed the tree to recover long enough(3-5 years) it may be a moot point...you are just losing 3-5 years of development time.
Cutting lower may be a good call - I just don't know much about this species so I was a bit conservative. How low would you chop #2?

- Scott
 
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garywood

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I'm with John on this one, #2. The interplay is much more interesting to me. To me the others are just trunks without the umph that outweighs the interest in #2.
 

Adair M

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Tree 2.

Rare to find a nice triple trunk. Good movement on all the trunks. I like how the tallest is the thickest, and the shortest is the thinnest. All good.

When is the workshop? If it's anytime soon, there's little to do.
 

markyscott

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Tree 2.

Rare to find a nice triple trunk. Good movement on all the trunks. I like how the tallest is the thickest, and the shortest is the thinnest. All good.

When is the workshop? If it's anytime soon, there's little to do.
Spring 2019. It would be a short workshop if it was next year.

- Scott
 

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