Help& Suggestions Please

Acerofspades

Seedling
Messages
19
Reaction score
0
Location
Ohio
I have put up some Pics.in my album and would like anyone to comment on what to do or not to do.I have tried to put them in B-nut's Gallery too.will not upload to other galleries.I have 50 to 60 J-maples to train.Any suggestions would be appretiated. Thanks
 
Messages
954
Reaction score
2
Location
HELL
in your profile, you should list where you are from, so we will know what kinda weather you get, helps if you have any questions... besides everyone will keep asking.
so, where do you live ??? I can tell it is further north of me cause my japanese maples have be torched by the sun, but they do look really nice in the fall and spring! I really should get rid of them, I just haven't the heart as of yet.
Now, I am not as expert an anyways, when it comes to japanese maples... but In my opinion, I would probally just let them grow for now... and allow the trunks to really thicken up, besides they can always be cut later. If one wanted to you might wire the trunks, to get a little more movement in them??? Since you have 50 to 60, you are going to need alot of wire!!!
Perhaps sell or trade some for other plants... there is a selling forum at this site, you might put a listing there.
Good Luck
 

Acerofspades

Seedling
Messages
19
Reaction score
0
Location
Ohio
I thank you for your reply.I am in Ohio Stacy.I will add it to profile
 

Acerofspades

Seedling
Messages
19
Reaction score
0
Location
Ohio
Lupe21,I thank you also.Is there any time limit that you would suggest for in ground.I thougt that trainning should be in pots or does it matter?
 

tatorger

Sapling
Messages
35
Reaction score
0
Location
Orange County, NY
USDA Zone
6a
I agree with lupe. put them in the ground, do a trunk chop in five to ten years depending on your final design ideas. dig em up put them in a pot and work on nebari and branch development.

Good Luck!
 

rockm

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
9,680
Reaction score
12,350
Location
Fairfax Va.
USDA Zone
7
"Is there any time limit that you would suggest for in ground.I thougt that trainning should be in pots or does it matter?"

The maples should be planted out in the ground. Initial development work is primarily done to develop the tree's main trunk. This is not efficiently done in a container, but in the ground. A container severely limits the amount of supporting root mass that is needed to support the huge amount of top growth that will thicken the trunk below. The more root mass, the faster the trunk will thicken. You shouldn't prune top growth much during this period, as top pruning slows development of the trunk.

There is no time limit on in-ground planting. The longer you leave it, the more developed THE TRUNK will become. Once it reaches the diameter you want for a final design, you dig it up. You can also periodically prune the roots and put it back in the ground to further develop initial top branching also. Any initial development work (trunk, primary branching) is always faster when done in the ground.

In the case of seedlings like yours, this initial work could take at least five years. Avoid the tempetation to plant them out and dig them up too soon. In ground planting doesn't really do any good unless the tree is left in the ground for at least three years. It takes that long for the tree to become well-established and grow a decent root mass.
 

Brian Van Fleet

Pretty Fly for a Bonsai Guy
Messages
11,670
Reaction score
31,241
Location
B’ham, AL
USDA Zone
8A
I agree with lupe. put them in the ground, do a trunk chop in five to ten years depending on your final design ideas. dig em up put them in a pot and work on nebari and branch development.

Good Luck!
This is a little out of order...First, arrange the roots radially when you put them into the ground so they develop properly to begin with (a spring task). Field-grown trees MUST be developed from the roots up. Get the nebari right in the first few years, then you can really let them grow like rockm described and you won't have to back-track. That way, when the stock gets to a training pot, you don't have to make big root cuts that slow down development of branches.
 

Acerofspades

Seedling
Messages
19
Reaction score
0
Location
Ohio
Thank you Brian will do and I must look up the meaning of Nebari. I did have all of them in the ground.Should I put them back now or wait till fall? I had planned on trying to build a cold storage bin and keep them in the pots and cover them for winter.
 

Acerofspades

Seedling
Messages
19
Reaction score
0
Location
Ohio
And thanks to you Rockm. I will put them back in the ground,well most of them.The little forest is for my wife.and two others.By the way If some are kept in pots in winter in cold storage do you still need to water?I had planed to cover them with some mulch and let the snow fall on them.
 

rockm

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
9,680
Reaction score
12,350
Location
Fairfax Va.
USDA Zone
7
I mulch my maples into garden beds at the end of November. Before I cover the pots with mulch, I make sure the pots are set level on paving bricks. This ensures rain and snow melt drains through the pots. I've water the pots well before throwing the mulch on. I've never had to water them while they are in storage. They have no overhead covering, so they get rain and snow on the mulch, which retains enough moisture to get them through the winter.

If you keep the trees in a more sheltered location, like under the eaves of your house, or in a cold garage, you will have to monitor their watering more closely to make sure they don't dry out.
 

Acerofspades

Seedling
Messages
19
Reaction score
0
Location
Ohio
rockm you are a Blessing.If i understand you right I have trees that I must get busy on.I will take some pics.to send to you if I can and if you are willing for you to evaluate.
 
Top Bottom