Tedescojmt

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Hello.. I feel absolutely awful for having to write this but want to try to ask for help before it’s possibly too late.

I bought a Bald Cypress on Facebook marketplace around 5 months ago. Here is a picture on the first day I got it.

C8970E7B-93A3-4208-B4A1-81E857A0C704.png

A beautiful tree, originally from Florida. I live in an apartment in Denver, CO plant zone 5b.

After speaking with the owner and numerous Reddit posts, I kept the tree in my garage (storage unit) from Feb-April. It was kept in 40-55 degree F temperatures and was pretty much in complete darkness for 3 months for dormant season. I’ve been told this was my mistake and I should’ve exposed it to more sun. I couldn’t plant it in the ground due to not having a yard. I watered the tree every 2 weeks or so to keep the soil damp.

After 1 weeks of being out of the garage and on my balcony, 8 hours of south facing sun, I’m seeing minimal budding on the very tips of a few branches but that’s it.

Here it is today.. only 1 week in the sun so far (during that 1 weeks we only had 2 sunny, hot days) but not looking happy.. :(

A3B4D44B-59C1-4FF1-A501-598ED96823B1.jpeg


When doing the bark test, I’m seeing green on the budding branches DD648C86-654D-4354-9DEB-09672010376A.jpegbut not on the trunk or roots..

21A49B04-1F96-4370-9059-B01499D2AB5A.jpeg
DEDB123D-4916-42D6-9ACA-8B02D8A46DB7.jpeg

Any help/recommendations/advice would be greatly appreciated as again, I hate to be posting this and feel absolutely awful that my tree isn’t happy.
 
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sorce

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You shouldn't feel as bad as the seller.

Welcome to Crazy!

If they had any care about that tree, they wouldn't have allowed it to go to that impossible environment. There is not much difference on earth, thick swamp air, thin mountain air.

I would only buy trees from people with more reverence for the trees. Otherwise, how is it nothing but a scam?

Sorce
 

sorce

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That said....

I reckon since your satisfaction with this tree will end after it "comes back to life", cuz next winter....dead...

You might should go ahead and take advantage of dropping that shit off the balcony and watching the pot smash!

Sorce
 

Forsoothe!

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Too many (new) people consider winter just an inconvenient interlude between summers. Unfortunately, not so. There is still a lot of stuff going on in autumn, which is the preparatory period of getting ready for the next growing season AND for the winter ahead. There is root growth still occurring anytime the root zone conditions are suitable and lots of changes in chemistry evolving into autumn and winter, thence to spring. They are all part of the system that allows trees (et al) to protect themselves from non-growing weather and explode into growth at the right time in the following spring. No rest period, no nada.
 

Cadillactaste

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This tree didn't have time to acclimate. Bringing in a southern tree that late and in winter.

I winter my bald cypress in a cold greenhouse with blinds to prevent light from coming in. But I keep it 32-35F... your tree was in temps that didn't permit full dormancy. So would of needed light.

How often did you water it while in there? Even my dormant trees are watered once a week.

I have a feeling it was more than one major hiccup that set this tree into this mode. What was wintering temps when mailed? All sorts of factors.
 

PA_Penjing

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I'd bet a good amount of dough this thing leafs out as temps rise. It's shocked and weakened right now but give it time to come back. Maybe someone here would disagree with me but using a scratch test on BC can be deceiving, in past winters scratching has shown me brown wood on my cypress' that woke up just fine in the spring. IMO these trees look straight up dead when they're dormant. The fact that yours is scratching green is really good. Like sorce said...sort of... moving forward this tree might not be the best fit for Denver. I gave up on BC after many attempts because they always seemed to be over coming something in my climate. They grow here, and they're hardy beyond, but I have to think there's a reason they grow so specifically where they do.
 

Cadillactaste

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I'd bet a good amount of dough this thing leafs out as temps rise. It's shocked and weakened right now but give it time to come back. Maybe someone here would disagree with me but using a scratch test on BC can be deceiving, in past winters scratching has shown me brown wood on my cypress' that woke up just fine in the spring. IMO these trees look straight up dead when they're dormant. The fact that yours is scratching green is really good. Like sorce said...sort of... moving forward this tree might not be the best fit for Denver. I gave up on BC after many attempts because they always seemed to be over coming something in my climate. They grow here, and they're hardy beyond, but I have to think there's a reason they grow so specifically where they do.
I say it's 50/50. It was shipped in winter. No time to acclimate. I've always been told the BC from Florida isn't as cold hardy as Louisiana. (I have one from Florida.) But that it wasn't watered well...and they love water...and no acclimating period.

That said...I agree I no longer do the scratch test.
 

Zach Smith

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If the tree is budding at the branch tips then you've got a shot at saving it. You won't see trunk buds for a while, so that's no indicator; small branches always bud first.

BC's are pretty tough. Make sure it gets plenty of sunshine and water. Once the buds open, watch for shoots (rather than simply leaves/fronds). If those shoots start extending, the tree is making its recovery. If they push some and then stall out, then that's bad news. In the top of the tree will be the strongest shoots; apical dominance is always the rule.
 

Sekibonsai

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I'd bet a good amount of dough this thing leafs out as temps rise. It's shocked and weakened right now but give it time to come back. Maybe someone here would disagree with me but using a scratch test on BC can be deceiving, in past winters scratching has shown me brown wood on my cypress' that woke up just fine in the spring. IMO these trees look straight up dead when they're dormant. The fact that yours is scratching green is really good. Like sorce said...sort of... moving forward this tree might not be the best fit for Denver. I gave up on BC after many attempts because they always seemed to be over coming something in my climate. They grow here, and they're hardy beyond, but I have to think there's a reason they grow so specifically where they do.
Yes, they can be tricky to scratch test. Don't pick the thing to death now though. Its either going to pop or its not.

There does seem to be some regional variety in BC. I adamantly refuse to sell the better specimens to anyone up North because I have seen too many Southern collected trees just ultimately fail up North. And vice versa I imagine. That said there are specimens in the National Collection and elsewhere that show that it IS possible with the right expertise.

Keep it evenly moist and wait for the pop and in full sun. If you can get some Rhizotonic or similar from one of the grow shops that might help. Or even a hit with some liquid kelp.
 

Colorado

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Hello.. I feel absolutely awful for having to write this but want to try to ask for help before it’s possibly too late.

I bought a Bald Cypress on Facebook marketplace around 5 months ago. Here is a picture on the first day I got it.

View attachment 373826

A beautiful tree, originally from Florida. I live in an apartment in Denver, CO plant zone 5b.

After speaking with the owner and numerous Reddit posts, I kept the tree in my garage (storage unit) from Feb-April. It was kept in 40-55 degree F temperatures and was pretty much in complete darkness for 3 months for dormant season. I’ve been told this was my mistake and I should’ve exposed it to more sun. I couldn’t plant it in the ground due to not having a yard. I watered the tree every 2 weeks or so to keep the soil damp.

After 1 weeks of being out of the garage and on my balcony, 8 hours of south facing sun, I’m seeing minimal budding on the very tips of a few branches but that’s it.

Here it is today.. only 1 week in the sun so far (during that 1 weeks we only had 2 sunny, hot days) but not looking happy.. :(

View attachment 373828


When doing the bark test, I’m seeing green on the budding branches View attachment 373829but not on the trunk or roots..

View attachment 373830
View attachment 373831

Any help/recommendations/advice would be greatly appreciated as again, I hate to be posting this and feel absolutely awful that my tree isn’t happy.

You need to be patient - my bald cypress in the ground has not leafed out yet either. There’s still a chance for this one and if it comes back, there’s no reason you can’t grow Bald Cypress in Denver, with appropriate winter protection.

There are some old ones planted on the plaza up in Boulder and there are some scattered about as park trees in Denver. Although, I must admit, not the easiest species to grow here.

Good luck!
 

PA_Penjing

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There does seem to be some regional variety in BC
When I trained them I did my best to source ONLY the "Northern ecotype" but so few people care to keep records it's hard to find. Another reason on my pile of complaints with the species haha.
But I do recommend (to the OP, in the future) taking the time to look for trees with a Northern origin. extra points if you find some from America's interior as opposed to the shores MD,DE and VA
 

Cadillactaste

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Yes, they can be tricky to scratch test. Don't pick the thing to death now though. Its either going to pop or its not.

There does seem to be some regional variety in BC. I adamantly refuse to sell the better specimens to anyone up North because I have seen too many Southern collected trees just ultimately fail up North. And vice versa I imagine. That said there are specimens in the National Collection and elsewhere that show that it IS possible with the right expertise.

Keep it evenly moist and wait for the pop and in full sun. If you can get some Rhizotonic or similar from one of the grow shops that might help. Or even a hit with some liquid kelp.
Interesting...I've always heard yours locally are more hardy for northerners. I now slip into zone 4...for winters. But I've a controlled cold greenhouse and my BC does well for me. Mine is from Florida...where everyone says they need protection if brought up north. So yours from Louisiana you would suggest protection as well then to a degree for winters up this way.
 

PA_Penjing

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Seems like BC is the winner of the most bonsai myths haha. It seems like there is a lot we have left to learn or at least agree on with this species, despite being widely used. Maybe it's just a personal bias because I couldn't crack the code 😪
 

just.wing.it

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There does seem to be some regional variety in BC.
Yeah, I have 2 BCs, from 2 separate nurseries, bought in different years....and the foliage on one is purple colored as it emerges while the other is a much lighter green. They're definitely a little different, but not according to their tags....both just regular BCs.
 

Cadillactaste

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Yeah, I have 2 BCs, from 2 separate nurseries, bought in different years....and the foliage on one is purple colored as it emerges while the other is a much lighter green. They're definitely a little different, but not according to their tags....both just regular BCs.
Purple tinted foliage...interesting.
 

Forsoothe!

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I think it's safe to say that the conditions during introduction from hither to yon make more than a little difference. Bringing a southern tree north in autumn is probably asking for problems because it would not have the complete slowing down cycle of the north in preparation of winter. One brought north in spring as a nursery plant in a pot for some time prior to sale should have the whole summer to settle in and not have a problem. Introducing a northern tree to the south in autumn might have similar outcomes because of a shorter winter followed by a hotter summer. Of course, differing levels of resistance to diseases and pests matter, making it impossible to generalize.
 

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