Help with identification

stu929

Mame
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Hoping maybe the group can help ID these. Temped to leave them and dig them up in spring.

My first guess would be mulberry (there are so many leaves that look like this) and red maple or Amur maple but not sure.
 

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Leo in N E Illinois

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Mulberry tend to have "mitten leaves", lobed leaves. See attached PDF.

Your first photo looks like Carpinus, hornbeam. Though it could also be an elm, Ulmus pumila = Siberian elm, is one possibility. Where this first seedling is growing will help with ID. If in full sun, it could be Ulmus pumila. If it is growing in part shade, it definitely is NOT Ulmus pumila. Siberian elms only grow in full sun. Carpinus, the hornbeams tend to grow in part shade.

The maple I have no strong feelings about. Yes, it is a maple of some sort. It is NOT a Japanese maple, It is not a sugar maple, it is not a Norway maple. But that still leaves a dozen possible different maples.

It is sometimes difficult to identify young seedling plants.
 

stu929

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I would say the first one is growing in midday to afternoon sun. Surprised it still has it's leaves.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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For some reason my pdf won't upload to BNut, go to Wikipedia

and to the Wikimedia page for mulberry to see more photos of leaves.


Mulberry leaves have more width, compared to length, than the first photo. The mulberry typically have some leaves that are lobed in addition to leaves that are not lobed. The serration (teeth) on the margin of the leaves for mulberry are more coarse than the serration of leaves in your first photo.

You "maple leaf" could be maple, probably is maple, but could also be Viburnum triloba. or one of the other Viburnum species.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Well given only a half day of sun, it is probably not Siberian elm. So hornbeam, and or one of the other elm species is possible. You might have to allow the seedling to get some more size to be certain what it is.
 

stu929

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I know there's a ton or serrated leaves I guess mulberry because there are what I believe three others in the yard but they have all lost their leaves. I know It could be a lot of other things.
 

stu929

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Well given only a half day of sun, it is probably not Siberian elm. So hornbeam, and or one of the other elm species is possible. You might have to allow the seedling to get some more size to be certain what it is.
I'm okay with that. I was just debating if I wanted to dig it up. Unfortunately if I leave it longer than spring it will get mowed. It's already survived a mower more than once but I will likely dig it up in spring andove it. Would be excited for an elm or Hornbeam as I have a Hornbeam that may not live and no elms yet.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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The good news is, regardless of species, you know it tolerates a half day of shade. Soil and watering for hornbeams and elms is more or less similar, as is the basic bonsai training. Once in a pot, it will be possible to get better image of the trunk, and the texture of the bark. You should be able to figure out what species it is once it is in a pot.

Note: the dormant winter buds, the arrangement of the bud scales that cover the bud are actually a botanically significant diagnostic. Get a good picture of the dormant buds just as the begin to swell in spring, which is a good time to collect them. Then compare with twig & bud images on the web. You might be able to nail down genus, if not species.
 

Graft

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I thought maples had opposite budding?? Could someone correct me if I'm wrong.🤔
 

eryk2kartman

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The 2nd photo looks a bit like some sort of Chinese Sweet Gum Tree - Liquidambar, i might be wrong :)
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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@Graft
Maples do have opposite budding. If the budding is alternate, it is not a maple, Acer. Did I miss that in a photo?

Liquidamber - the sweetgums - both the chinese and the north american sweetgums have alternate leaf budding.

Viburnums - genus Viburnum - almost all have opposite leaf budding, except one or two species that have alternate leaf budding. Go figure.
 

Graft

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@Graft
Maples do have opposite budding. If the budding is alternate, it is not a maple, Acer. Did I miss that in a photo?

Liquidamber - the sweetgums - both the chinese and the north american sweetgums have alternate leaf budding.

Viburnums - genus Viburnum - almost all have opposite leaf budding, except one or two species that have alternate leaf budding. Go figure.
Hi Leo,

Yes it's in the third photo. 👍
 

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