Hibiscus Syriacus (Common Hibiscus) #27

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What do you mean by "die off"? I simply pruned it back a bit this year to get some further branch division. They backbud readily.
 

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I don't see any dead branches on yours, it looks good.
The cultivars I just got have dry branches that is why I asked the question. In your experience, did all the branches come back the next year?
Good to hear they back bud readily, thank you for this bit of information
 
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There are two types of Hibiscus, the hardy type, and the tropical type. I dont know what type you have, where you are located, how you overwintered your tree.... can you give some additional detail?

None of my branches died off. I overwintered in ground with pot buried since these are hardy to my area. I would never attempt this with a tropical variety in my zone 7b. Hibiscus Syriacus is hardy to at least zone 5.

Hibiscus Syriacus are often used as or end up in hedges in this area, and I've personally cut these to three inch stumps and have seen them backbud everywhere.
 

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Thank you for your question and taking the time to respond.
The ones I have are also a syriacus, rose of sharon, much like the name of this thread and the one you have. I am in zone 5a so these are hardy to be grown outdoors here and survive winter fine.

The tree saplings are rescues, they were growing in the hedges. I actually planted them some 7-8 years ago as seedlings. They "died" in the planting location and then few years later (this year) I found them in a different area of the garden, intertwined with the hedges. I dug them up and moved them into the ground and some to large growing pots in a different location where they will have more chances to develop- room and access to the sun. The plan is to let the trees thicken up their trunks. Even though they are some 8 years old, their trunks aren't much thicker then a finger due to lack of nutrients they were receiving in the hedge.

When I egzamined them, they don't really show many branches and many smaller branches died off completely, thus my question. They do seem to have formed buds everywhere on the trunk and on the first branches. It has been rather cold this spring, so they haven't actually opened their buds yet. I'd like to study them over the next few years and observe how they respond to changes, branch wiring and clip and grow to ramify the branches well. It is a new species to me and I'm not at all familiar with how it behaves, so I find this thread helpful
 

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This thread appeared right on que.

Just bought a small bush for my wife for mother's day, and was thinking about getting another for me. No clue what variety (WalMart, so go figure they wouldn't say) though I'm assuming they're a cold hardy type since the last few days of highs in the 40s F didn't kill it. When I read up on them one article said that in the landscape they often die back to the roots in winter, and sprout back in the spring. They aren't common hear, so I have no clue what to expect if I did get another one.
 

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When I read up on them one article said that in the landscape they often die back to the roots in winter, and sprout back in the spring.
Are you sure you have a Rose of Sharon, or a hardy Hibiscus (hibiscus muscheutos/swamp rose mallow)? My hardy hibiscus die back to the roots every year, they are just coming up now. They have huge dinner plate size flowers and are more shrub than tree.
 

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love hibiscus, in fact its prob top 3 favorite of anything for me.
bring me to the north shore of hawaii for a day at pipeline, from my backyard in taxachusetts.
the dream.

the rose of sharon are the purple ones im pretty sure and are common hedge and landscape tree where im from. they are common hibiscus. hardy hibiscus are variety of rose of sharon i think. then theres the tropical variety, as seen in this photo:


goo20200622_165825_resized.jpgd luck!
 

Carol 83

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love hibiscus, in fact its prob top 3 favorite of anything for me.
bring me to the north shore of hawaii for a day at pipeline, from my backyard in taxachusetts.
the dream.

the rose of sharon are the purple ones im pretty sure and are common hedge and landscape tree where im from. they are common hibiscus. hardy hibiscus are variety of rose of sharon i think. then theres the tropical variety, as seen in this photo:


gooView attachment 374105d luck!
I love the tropical ones also, I have a bunch. Yours looks like "Fiesta", one of my favs. This is a hardy one in my garden. hardy hibiscus 2.jpg
 

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I love the tropical ones also, I have a bunch. Yours looks like "Fiesta", one of my favs. This is a hardy one in my garden.
very nice. reminds me of my luna white hardy (somewhat new to me) but yours has additional pink.
1620830681181.png

good call on the fiesta, thanks for the info



@Orion_metalhead do you know what color yours is?
 

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This thread appeared right on que.

Just bought a small bush for my wife for mother's day, and was thinking about getting another for me. No clue what variety (WalMart, so go figure they wouldn't say) though I'm assuming they're a cold hardy type since the last few days of highs in the 40s F didn't kill it. When I read up on them one article said that in the landscape they often die back to the roots in winter, and sprout back in the spring. They aren't common hear, so I have no clue what to expect if I did get another one.
if it dies back it is likely not rose of sharon, I had the hardy one that dies back too, huge, beautiful flowers. Perhaps it wouldn't die off if you took indoors for the winter?
 

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Last year, the other one I have flowered the typical rose of sharon pink with some white inner petals. This one is from same batch of seeds so I assume the same.

Here it is this morning:
View attachment 374112
looking great! What fun process to grow from the seed. The most exciting part is to see the leaves open up.

I'll take some photos of mine soon, warmer weather is coming so it will hopefully open up.
The dead branches were there before the move, so it was not a result of the move, but the root balls were tiny compared to what you shared here in photos. Hopefully with more room for the roots the branches will stay and not die
 

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If they were just collected recently and put in pots, the die back could be because of lack of new roots or from the collection process. Post some pics!
Here are photos of the 3 rose of sharon rescued from the hedge jungle. Not sure how they took the transplant yet bc nothing has opened up, but the one in the ground looks most promising.

Hopefully you can see what I meant by died off branches- there's very few branches that are sturdy and alive, there are marks where dried off branches were. Mostly they look like trunk that forks out and no ramification- which after 8 years seems weird, but perhaps that's the characteristic of these species?20210512_162510.jpg20210512_162534.jpg20210512_162752.jpg
 

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Are you sure you have a Rose of Sharon, or a hardy Hibiscus (hibiscus muscheutos/swamp rose mallow)? My hardy hibiscus die back to the roots every year, they are just coming up now. They have huge dinner plate size flowers and are more shrub than tree.
Well, the sticker on the pot says Hibiscus. Doesn't say anything else about variety, but the flowers that were already on it match what I'm seeing in the pics here, though not the dinner plate size. Pink flowers, here and there little vine type things reaching out from the outer foliage, bark looks the same as these pics. Recognized them from pics, and gardens passed while traveling, though didn't realize what they were. I've not seen them offered by stores in the area before, and probably for a reason. Still, thought it was worth a shot.
 

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