Hinoki maddness

defra

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Unwired pruned a little and now rewired the future trunk and delicate primary branches to set the angles.

Had to warp the trunk a little while still so young to get 3d going (left right back etc) since the new trunk line was a former shoot/branch witch grows left - right only apex is left unwired to let it grow some more cus I don't want to break it.

Im aware this way might take years and years and from 10 years from now the tree might already outgrew its outline I have in mind now but it's a fun project to get known with this species!

Also from this point I got the branches where I want them and now I'll try to manage the foliage to stay as close as I can and see where we end up with in a couple years!

1: front?
IMG_20190731_173915.jpg

2: from above
IMG_20190731_173932.jpg

3: detail of the wires and primary's (yeah not the nicest wiring but had to be carefull not to break the delicate twigs)
IMG_20190731_173940.jpg

4: with beer can for size refference
IMG_20190731_174214.jpg


You might notice that the trunk section after the second branch is straight I'll try to correct that over the coming seasons and take my time with this little fellow!
 

AlainK

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I don't have one, but this one................... from a friend off mine. Hope you like it.
View attachment 250582
Wow, didn't know Junipers could have elephantisasis :D

Kidding aside, it's a beautiful tree that I don't like that much because to me it looks very artificial.

It"s a great bonsai, but it doesn't look like a Juniper. More like a "sumo" trident maple which is already very un-natural.

But OK, it's a beautiful bonsai of its kind.
 
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Wow, didn't know Junipers could have elephantisasis :D

Kidding aside, it's a beautiful tree that I don't like that much because to me it looks very artificial.

It"s a great bonsai, but it doesn't look like a Juniper. More like a "sumo" trident maple which is already very un-natural.

But OK, it's a beautiful bonsai of its kind.
Yup Bonsai.
Live is all about taste. I like all styles off "bonsai".
But sssssst don't tell anyone that it is a Chamaecyparis.;)
 

amatbrewer

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Since the title includes madness I will share this embarrassment.
I picked this up at a local nursery years ago, and in my ignorance cut away some really important material leaving it with lots of open trunk that will never backbud. I keep it around as a reminder and because my wife likes it.
I need to re pot it so I can try to rid myself of my irish moss infestation. Oh, and that flare at the base of the trunk...is really a nasty reverse taper that I am trying to ground layer out.
One thing I will say about it is that it cooperated nicely the few times I have played with developing pads, so it is good for practicing that at least.
One day I may cut it all the way back down to those bottom branches and start over.
20190802_072123.jpg
 

Japonicus

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Since the title includes madness I will share this embarrassment.
I picked this up at a local nursery years ago, and in my ignorance cut away some really important material leaving it with lots of open trunk that will never backbud. I keep it around as a reminder and because my wife likes it.
I need to re pot it so I can try to rid myself of my irish moss infestation. Oh, and that flare at the base of the trunk...is really a nasty reverse taper that I am trying to ground layer out.
One thing I will say about it is that it cooperated nicely the few times I have played with developing pads, so it is good for practicing that at least.
One day I may cut it all the way back down to those bottom branches and start over.
View attachment 255624
No worries on the hinoki, it's the Irish "moss" that hurts most. That's the ugliness in that pic.
Utilise lower branches +1 :)
 

wlambeth

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would the hinoki survive down in the dfw area?
 

Gsquared

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I’m not too sure if hinoki would do well in Texas. I had one in NorCal that I moved to San Diego (much cooler than DFW) and it didn’t make it. Took a couple of years but it finally petered out. I suspect it was the drier climate and just a little too warm. Might have been the rock hard water, but no matter, it wasn’t the right place for it. They like cool and moist from my experience.
 

Vance Wood

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You're right about one thing: They like cool and moist. Most people who fail with Hinokis when they try to treat them like other connifers. Hinokis like a lot of water but don't like being wet, so a very well draining soil mix is crucial, with frequent waterings to keep both the roots and foliage cool.
 

amatbrewer

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I’m not too sure if hinoki would do well in Texas. I had one in NorCal that I moved to San Diego (much cooler than DFW) and it didn’t make it. Took a couple of years but it finally petered out. I suspect it was the drier climate and just a little too warm. Might have been the rock hard water, but no matter, it wasn’t the right place for it. They like cool and moist from my experience.
Mine gets full sun all summer with >100F temps (it is going to be 103 today) and single digit humidity, and my styling mistakes not withstanding, it has remained quite healthy for the 8 years or so I have had it. I would note that it has always been in a large training pot which probably makes a big difference.
 
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With all the talk about summer repotting in other threads - would late summer repotting be a viable option for a healthy Hinoki in zone 7a? Next two weeks will be alternating between partial sun and rain with daytime temps below 90 and nighttime temps around 70 with nice, cool fog every morning.
 

Vance Wood

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With all the talk about summer repotting in other threads - would late summer repotting be a viable option for a healthy Hinoki in zone 7a? Next two weeks will be alternating between partial sun and rain with daytime temps below 90 and nighttime temps around 70 with nice, cool fog every morning.
In my experience; Yes. Just don't let the roots get too hot.
 

amatbrewer

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With all the talk about summer repotting in other threads - would late summer repotting be a viable option for a healthy Hinoki in zone 7a? Next two weeks will be alternating between partial sun and rain with daytime temps below 90 and nighttime temps around 70 with nice, cool fog every morning.
This may be one of those 'can' vs 'should' things.
I did repot mine (knowing it is probably very risky) because I really wanted to to finally rid myself of the Irish moss infestation. This was the last and worst pot I had, I have been putting it off for far too long, and I am sick of going around with a pair of tweezers plucking the little bastards out of my other pots.

It is probably important to mention that it is in a large grow pot, and after repotting I moved it to a place where it is shaded from the midday sun, the tree was healthy and had not been 'messed with' for over about two years. Of course immediately after the repot temperatures spiked (it is supposed to be 103F today) so it may end badly for this tree (or I could get lucky). So over the next couple of weeks/months I may be able to say if one "CAN", but as for if one "should"...that may be another matter entirely.

I would mention this is one advantage of having some of the garbage material that some may suggest not wasting time on...I can afford to take risks experimenting, and regardless of the outcome I gain valuable experience/knowledge.
"Everyone has value, even if only as a bad example."
 

LeonardB

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In my experience; Yes. Just don't let the roots get too hot.
Does that include root pruning to fit into a pot? Also transitioning from nursery soil to bonsai soil?
 

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