Hinoki maddness

Vance Wood

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Does that include root pruning to fit into a pot? Also transitioning from nursery soil to bonsai soil?
Yes I have done that as well but don't cut off more than 50% and be prepared to put the tree in shade for a week or so.
 
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Hmm, sounds like Id be better waiting to repot in Springtime as normal for the best possible outcomes.
 

Sansui

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This is a young Vokel's Hinoki Cypress. It was grown at the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society Growing Center in Meadowbrook, PA. I wired and potted it last spring. It is about 12-14" tall.
 

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LeonardB

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This is a young Vokel's Hinoki Cypress. It was grown at the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society Growing Center in Meadowbrook, PA. I wired and potted it last spring. It is about 12-14" tall.
Very nice!
 

Sansui

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I bought this one this past spring from NEBG. I was told it was a Mark Comstock tree. It fell off the bench the third week I owned it and I am just watching how it grows for now to make sure it is healthy before I do too much. Hope to use it for workshop next spring.
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Hi!, Just want to know how your tree fell over? If you want a simple, unobtrusive way to attach trees to benches so they don't get blown or knocked over I can share my method with you.
 

coltranem

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Hi!, Just want to know how your tree fell over? If you want a simple, unobtrusive way to attach trees to benches so they don't get blown or knocked over I can share my method with you.
Wind and a plastic pot...I am all ears.
 

Sansui

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A recent post from my website (graciebonsai.com)

High Stakes Bonsai

Inevitably, my smaller bonsai, and even some of my larger bonsai in lightweight pots get knocked over on the benches from high winds, squirrels, birds and inquisitive deer. When this occurs the best case is finding the bonsai intact and remaining on the bench (I never cry over spilled soil). The worst case is finding broken branches and broken pots on the ground!
Here is my stealth solution:
I am now attaching my vulnerable bonsai to my benches using homemade 3 mm aluminum wire stakes and 1/4″ x 1″ stainless steel fender washers. I start by stretching a length 3 mm wire to straighten it and add extra rigidity. Copper wire is certainly an acceptable alternative. I use the Bonsai Wire Bending Grip mounted to my outdoor bonsai workbench and pliers to do this, however, you can certainly use a vise in your basement or garage workshop.
Next wrap two turns of one end of the wire around the Bonsai Wire Bending Grip’s smaller 1/4″ post and then bend the completed looped end at a 90 degree angle. Trim any excess wire as needed. Then slide the fender washer over the wire toward the looped end. Almost finished!

Now, using the wire stake like an acupuncture needle carefully drill through the soil from the top of the soil and through the drainage screen at the bottom of the pot.

If the soil is too compacted or the roots are very dense use a chopstick to tunnel most of the way through. If you still have difficulty getting through the soil and roots try using an offset angle or a different drainage hole. The fender washer should be buried below the soil or moss surface. Guide the tail end of the wire stake through an existing slot between the boards of the bench or drill a small hole. Finally, bend the wire against the bottom of the bench. Finished!
You can rotate your pots and easily remove them when needed. If you want to deter impromptu theft attach a screw and washer under the bench to tightly wrap the wire around. I hope you find this helpful!
 

Sansui

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So while I/we wait for moderator approval on my lenghtly reply... Take a look at the Adachi Museum of Art website for some inspiring trees (Niwaki) and garden. Look for the word' Live" under the Garden tab. The staff is currently performing garden maintenance.
 

Palmer67

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I bought one online from Brussels nursery. It was on sale cheap. I'm really new at this and I'm afraid this cypress is out of my league. I'll give it a go eventually, but I've been reading up on them before I try anything. Any thoughts for this one?
 

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My low impact approach would be to carefully bring the middle and lower branches down to a more horizontal position to assess the foliage, branch and trunk structure potential. Use string or guy wire to do this temporarily. Then step back and visually decide which is the front of the tree followed by which branches should be removed or repositioned based on the trunk's natural movement and foliage distribution. Generally, I try to follow the natural movement of the trunk line and then choose the alternating branch positions. The trunk can be reshaped (wired) to exaggerate its natural movement if desired. I recommend not doing any significant work until spring. This gives you lots of time to contemplate the initial design.
 

Palmer67

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My low impact approach would be to carefully bring the middle and lower branches down to a more horizontal position to assess the foliage, branch and trunk structure potential. Use string or guy wire to do this temporarily. Then step back and visually decide which is the front of the tree followed by which branches should be removed or repositioned based on the trunk's natural movement and foliage distribution. Generally, I try to follow the natural movement of the trunk line and then choose the alternating branch positions. The trunk can be reshaped (wired) to exaggerate its natural movement if desired. I recommend not doing any significant work until spring. This gives you lots of time to contemplate the initial design.
My thinking too, keep it alive and get as much growth as possible. Then next spring see what I have. :) I see what you're saying trying to figure out the front and appreciate the advice!
 

Vance Wood

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I have found that my relationship with Hinokis seem to be based on a slow and steady introduction. Understanding that in general they are not too forgiving of beginner mistakes and enthusiasm, I usually find it necessary to wait and study the tree. Avoid the temptation of choosing, arbitrarily, some sort of style with the dogmatic conviction of a dog with a bone. Instead just look at the tree from all angles even from below looking up into the tree, you never know what thing this kind of observations can yield. Put the tree on a trun table and give it a slow spin and just watch it. Eventually you will start seeing angles and features that look nice to you. Try to avoid anything that seems to indicate wind swept, cascade or formal upright, just think Tree Daniel San.
Hinokis are feminine, even sensual trees and should be treated so as to produce graceful movement. They are their own design for the most part, what you want to do is to discover the heart of the tree bring it out and accentuate its natural design and avoid anything arbitrary and coarse.
 
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bwaynef

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The first one I have had little responsibility for its styling. The latter, came from raw stock (I believe from Mark Comstock) and at the time I was overrun with trees so I had to start pruning things back. Once I got started it started making more sense, so I bothered wiring it out. I like how it turned out but it needs to develop a bit. (It could use a repot too. I don’t know what I was thinking.)
 

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Vance Wood

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Anything with a Hinoki has my approval, it's a wonderful tree.
 

bwaynef

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After styling that second one above, I thought I had hinoki figured out so I went and bought another one. I contemplated it and quickly realized the one I’d styled had been cared for a lot better than what you’d get at a big box store. I got frustrated after pruning that there just wasn’t much there.

Grabbed it about 8 months later and it had enough interest to give it a rough style. See below.

I’ve quickly come to really enjoy hinoki. I’ve got the three in this and my previous post and had to have a sawara (Chamaecyparis pisifera something) and tsukumo (I’ll check the tag to see if Julian Adams had the species listed) when I found them. (The former I’ve got 40-ish cuttings going from as it was severely overgrown. The latter is tiny.)
 

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Palmer67

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The first one I have had little responsibility for its styling. The latter, came from raw stock (I believe from Mark Comstock) and at the time I was overrun with trees so I had to start pruning things back. Once I got started it started making more sense, so I bothered wiring it out. I like how it turned out but it needs to develop a bit. (It could use a repot too. I don’t know what I was thinking.)
The taller one kinda looks like mine and I was thinking of styling in the same manner. Thanks for the pics and inspiration, I have some work to do.
 

Vance Wood

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I think you can start working on this tree, it looks healthy, vigorous and ready to go.
 

bwaynef

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Looking good after the early season fall off the bench. I am think maybe I can do some light trimming to open it up.
With Hinoki, you work your way in, not out. Keep the growth on the interior. You're not going to get anymore. You don't really want to "open it up". Remove branches growing from obviously wrong places. Use copper wire to put the remaining branches where you want them. Shorten the branches as needed.
 

coltranem

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With Hinoki, you work your way in, not out. Keep the growth on the interior. You're not going to get anymore. You don't really want to "open it up". Remove branches growing from obviously wrong places. Use copper wire to put the remaining branches where you want them. Shorten the branches as needed.
That was my plan. Remove foliage from the outside in. I meant I was opening it up to let light into that inner growth. I might save the styling until later this year. I just want to get light to those inner pieces of growth and be able to see more to plan the design.
 

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