Hinoki maddness

M. Frary

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Hmm, sounds like Id be better waiting to repot in Springtime as normal for the best possible outcomes.
Late spring into early summer when its pushing bright green new growth.
You can also bare root them if you have the nerve.
 

bwaynef

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After styling that second one above, **blah blah**

Grabbed it about 8 months later and it had enough interest to give it a rough style. See below
Word of advice: After removing large amounts of foliage on a hinoki, don't move it into bright sun for the rest of the year. I've got burn all over this one now.
 

Japonicus

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This showed up on my Instagram feed today. None other than Boon..WOW

View attachment 257481
Dang! He makes it look so simple. All that foliage so tight in to the trunk. yeh WOW indeed!
Not sure if it's poor resolution or what, but that foliage sure has a golden hinoki resemblance.
I don't like how the background is in focus to the right of the trunk, some on the left and blurred
elsewhere including the foliage on both sides at the extremities. Tree deserves better showmanship.
 

bwaynef

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I don't like how the background is in focus to the right of the trunk, some on the left and blurred
elsewhere including the foliage on both sides at the extremities. Tree deserves better showmanship.
I'd be willing to bet he took that picture using his iphone in portrait mode. It detects the subject and applies a blur mask to what it thinks is the background.
 

BuckeyeOne

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I saw this one at the nursery and hadn't seen Hinoki "Compacta" before.
Has an interesting trunk with some movement and a second large branch to the left of what I see as the front. The branch is hard to see in the pictures through all the foliage close to the trunk.
I was tied to a bamboo stake to promote upright grow which I liberated it from.
Should I restake and let grow to promote trunk development or chop at this time?
Buck.
 

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Maloghurst

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Letting grow bigger is all up to your preference. I personally would not hard prune at this time of year.
I would repot in spring and you could prune then also, if you leave a lot of foliage. When you repot you will find something good or bad beneath the soil. Usually there is flare of some sort.
I would consider a taller more slender tree though. As higher up is where all the best branches are.
Then again late summer repotting is all the rage right now.
 

defra

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I saw this one at the nursery and hadn't seen Hinoki "Compacta" before.
Has an interesting trunk with some movement and a second large branch to the left of what I see as the front. The branch is hard to see in the pictures through all the foliage close to the trunk.
I was tied to a bamboo stake to promote upright grow which I liberated it from.
Should I restake and let grow to promote trunk development or chop at this time?
Buck.
Interesting, but cannot make up anything from this pics since they are all taken from the view giants have on tree's!

Are you willing to take a picture from up front and preferably in front of a background existing from one collor?

I would not chop anything big yet as the design is still unknown and it's hard to prune parts back on ;)

Thinning it a bit is something you can do now I guess clean all the dead twigs on the inside and prune the foliage a little (no more then 30%)so it gets a little les dense to help and get the important inner parts some more light
also thining it Wil give you a better sight on the branching to look for styling options.
You mention a fat branch on the left I always try to look for the smallest tree in something and strong low placed side branches are often usable as the new trunk line but cannot tell if it is from this pics
Goodluck and looking forward to your progress
 

amatbrewer

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I have three questions I would like to bring up:

I noticed this bulge, and the Hinoki I have as well as some in a local nursery have a similar bulge at or just above ground level. Is this the result of a graft, something common to Hinoki, or something else?
258211

I am considering purchasing one of two Hinoki's I saw at a local nursery, both are the same price, and both have potential but for different reasons (sorry I forgot to get pix). #1 has good taper, movement and lots of branches/foliage to work with. #2 does not have quite as good a trunk, but does have the potential to be layered into 3 nice trees. Since they are at the upper end of my price range and there is so little good material near me, the 3 for 1 is an attractive feature but only if if I can successfully layer them off. So my question is how easy/hard is it to air layer Hinoki?

Lastly, I have been looking up all the information and images I can find of Hinoki and noticed few, if any, cascade or semi-cascade. (I did find one youtube video of someone wiring a semi-cascade Hinoki) Any ideas why there seem to be so few cascade style Hinoki's?
 

Vance Wood

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I have three questions I would like to bring up:

I noticed this bulge, and the Hinoki I have as well as some in a local nursery have a similar bulge at or just above ground level. Is this the result of a graft, something common to Hinoki, or something else?
View attachment 258211

I am considering purchasing one of two Hinoki's I saw at a local nursery, both are the same price, and both have potential but for different reasons (sorry I forgot to get pix). #1 has good taper, movement and lots of branches/foliage to work with. #2 does not have quite as good a trunk, but does have the potential to be layered into 3 nice trees. Since they are at the upper end of my price range and there is so little good material near me, the 3 for 1 is an attractive feature but only if if I can successfully layer them off. So my question is how easy/hard is it to air layer Hinoki?

Lastly, I have been looking up all the information and images I can find of Hinoki and noticed few, if any, cascade or semi-cascade. (I did find one youtube video of someone wiring a semi-cascade Hinoki) Any ideas why there seem to be so few cascade style Hinoki's?
I have seen this a lot and I tend to agree that it is a graft. I have one like this, in fact I believe this one is mine I have been working on for three years now.
 

amatbrewer

Shohin
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I have seen this a lot and I tend to agree that it is a graft. I have one like this, in fact I believe this one is mine I have been working on for three years now.
Good to know. I am in the process of ground layering mine to see if I can get it down to the soil level and disguise it as root flare. Not sure what happens when you try to ground layer right at a graft...😟 So far root growth above the tourniquet has been slow but it is looking promising, fingers crossed.
And yes, that is from your tree. ;)
 

amatbrewer

Shohin
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Good to know. I am in the process of ground layering mine to see if I can get it down to the soil level and disguise it as root flare. Not sure what happens when you try to ground layer right at a graft...😟 So far root growth above the tourniquet has been slow but it is looking promising, fingers crossed.
And yes, that is from your tree. ;)
Something interesting I just ran across http://bonsaiwonders-dev.blogspot.com/2008/01/chamaecyparis-obtusa-nana-hinoki-iii-pt.html
This comment is promising:
"I have thought about getting one of these for quite a while, but the huge knobs at the base of most of the ones I've seen have stopped me. I often wondered if they could be ground layered successfully and I guess by this post the answer is a definite yes."
 

Japonicus

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Lately there has been some interest in the Hinoki Cypress expressed in a number of threads. Personally I would like to see how many of us actually have these wonderful trees and what we have learned about them and what we are doing with them. If you all would be so kind as to post pictures and or videos I would be over-joyed to look at them.
Vance I've been reluctant to post any pictures of mine
as it's still in the wrong pot :rolleyes: and nothing as accomplished as yours.
Several flaws anyone could jump on but I love this little tree.
This is today just before I begin thinning again in preparation for some wire.
DSC_3515.JPG DSC_3514.JPG DSC_3519.JPG DSC_3520.JPG DSC_3511.JPG
Normally with my conifers I'm keeping all foliage from September on if I plan to repot in the Spring.
I plan to repot this one, but being how they just don't back bud...I'm going to thin it somewhat.
I'm never happy with how little I seem to thin, but resist going any further.
This was in a 2.5 - 3" pot, a Golden variety, and about the size of my fist when I got it locally.
Unsure if it was a successful cutting or layered, but it was pretty small.
Wore the Summer very well, and we've had more than double the number of 90ºF days this year than last.

I also love the cinnamon coloured bark.
 

Japonicus

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Before and after wiring 😶

1567357650943.png DSC_3526.JPG

Not my best wiring job but hinoki and 12 and 10 ga copper wire is/can be, a difficult combination.
Hinoki is notorious to rip small branches, and one I did whilst wiring. Nothing major.
I intermingled aluminum for the more gentle bends where holding power wasn't so necessary
and refrained from any more thinning anticipating a Spring repot, so some extraneous foliage kept.

I swear I like the before picture better, but keeping all natural, keeps many flaws.
The trunk is a little more exposed by moving branches, and the anchor wire on the bottom left branch is now gone.
It should look much better in a couple years and in its new temporary pot that I already have wired out to anchor in.
DSC_3529.JPG
 

Japonicus

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Stopped at Plant City Bonsai and the Monastery in Georgia this weekend
and picked up a couple of cypress trees. The Seka cypress I absolutely love
the nebari, and was repotted 2 weeks ago by Sandy at PCB.
The Thoweil Hinoki is from the Monastery distributed by Iseli Nursery.
DSC_3654.JPG DSC_3661.JPG DSC_3663.JPG
Seka like hinoki, does not back bud if I am informed properly. It appears to be a very slow grower!
 

Littlejoe919

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Picked up this tree from Matt Smith in November of 2018. Was bare rooted and put in a Vance inspired grow pot in March of 2019, and styled with Bjorn in August. I'll baby this tree through the winter . I'm pretty excited about its future.

266705266706266707
 

LeonardB

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I have seen this a lot and I tend to agree that it is a graft. I have one like this, in fact I believe this one is mine I have been working on for three years now.
Speaking of new purchases I bought these two field grown trees this year. I plan to repot into bonsai soil in the spring of 2020. They look really old to me, what do you think of them?
 

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