Hophornbeam or hornbeam?

hinmo24t

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got these from behind where I work w my coworker a few weeks ago in MA. Anyone know the ID? Also after @sorce mentioned it recently I think I found some elm saplings growing in yew hedges nearby...they look kind of similar

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sorce

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Doesn't look @hoppy to me.

I'd rather Beam anyway!

Sorce
 

hinmo24t

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heres another one. i got a few of elm, hornbeam or zelcova (maybe no without 'red' tips or growth) from around where i live and work.
this one went brown on me soon after i got it, but then leafed out again. some cool movement and i wont be afraid to cut these low
next season. chance this is different than ones above...not positive on these elm/ironwood/zelcova etc. yet.

going to love new england foliage though

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M. Frary

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That's no hornbeam.
Or elm.
It looks more like birch or some kind of alder.
And why oh why do people collect trees without knowing what it is?
Contrary to popular belief most trees do not turn out to be good bonsai material.
 

hinmo24t

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That's no hornbeam.
Or elm.
It looks more like birch or some kind of alder.
And why oh why do people collect trees without knowing what it is?
Contrary to popular belief most trees do not turn out to be good bonsai material.
Hophornbeams are a type of birch and I'm pretty sure thats what it is. Thanks though lol
I am clearing some woods to extend my new fence and saved one from over there. The other two from work...I think they have potential actually

The first & second photo's look like my oystrya viginagna they are related to birch

Thanks. Same. This ones my favorite. I think the person who guessed elm on other was correct. Siberian elm

Here's the one I like the lower movement on a lot, fall foliage where I live could be nice

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BobbyLane

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Hophornbeams are a type of birch and I'm pretty sure thats what it is. Thanks though lol
I am clearing some woods to extend my new fence and saved one from over there. The other two from work...I think they have potential actually



Thanks. Same. This ones my favorite. I think the person who guessed elm on other was correct. Siberian elm

Here's the one I like the lower movement on a lot, fall foliage where I live could be nice

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potential for what?
 

hinmo24t

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potential for what?
Potential for one of my best trees because of its current structure and species
Then again a few of my smaller yamadori hemlock, literati beech yamodori and purchased amberglow redwood will compete against it i think
 

Lutonian

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This is my one, hop hornbeams are related to birch but it is a different species though. Hornbeams are related to birch too and are a different species to both birch and hop hornbeams https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornbeam
 

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hinmo24t

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This is my one, hop hornbeams are related to birch but it is a different species though. Hornbeams are related to birch too and are a different species to both birch and hop hornbeams https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornbeam
Very cool. Any full shots? I see the bark reference too. They're cool trees. Good walking stick wood i think.
 

M. Frary

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Hophornbeams are a type of birch and I'm pretty sure thats what it is. Thanks though lol
I am clearing some woods to extend my new fence and saved one from over there. The other two from work...I think they have potential actually
No shit.
And when immature like this is they look similar.
And what potential do you see in this?
It's still a long way from becoming a bonsai.
Years.
And if it really is a hornbeam,. decades.
Why not collect a tree with a trunk already grown and start from there?
Saving it from death is nice and all but they make trees every day.
 

hinmo24t

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Im 4 years at this property and 34 and early in garden and bonsai builds. Stoked on my hop/hornbeams, do you have any? Having a finished tree isn't as important to me as growing a decently cool looking tree, journey is just starting
 

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