Hornbeam No.11 progression

Maros

Shohin
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Hi,

I would like to share with you few pictures of one of my hornbeams (Carpinus betulus). Tree is collected from wild since 2010. It has interesting nebari, even if after repotting one of major roots is above ground level. This is bit problematic, and need to be solved in the future. Tree was repotted from plastic bowl into temporary ceramic pot in 2012. Now, last week I did complete wiring of the tree. Took a bit longer but fun to do. I will appreciate your comments to design or any other remarks.
Full story with more pictures you can fined on my blog here;)

3-2010.jpg3-2010e.jpg3-2013c.jpg4-2014a.jpg1-2015o.jpg
 

CWTurner

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Hi Maros,

I really like this tree.

The "shelf-like" branch on the left with its sharp angle, and the thickness, but femininity, of the large branch on the right are attractive to my eyes. Not traditional (?) but a really nice tree.

I also like the way that the stub on root finished up.

Congrats!

CW
 

JudyB

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Really good job Maros. I like the large secondary trunk, I see lots of beautiful examples of this in nature. Have you thought of tilting the tree back to the left a bit, to bury the root stub a tiny bit more?
What pot are you thinking of for this tree? I bet it's going to be gorgeous with the right pot.
 

Maros

Shohin
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Thanks for all comments. I'm glad you like the tree.

Hi Maros,

I really like this tree.

The "shelf-like" branch on the left with its sharp angle, and the thickness, but femininity, of the large branch on the right are attractive to my eyes. Not traditional (?) but a really nice tree.

I also like the way that the stub on root finished up.

Congrats!

CW
CW - funny you write this that it is not traditional. Actually, I was afraid that I "japonised" it too much during last wiring. :)
My aim is to let the tree look as natural as possible. Not easy task according my experience, though.

Have you thought of tilting the tree back to the left a bit, to bury the root stub a tiny bit more?
What pot are you thinking of for this tree? I bet it's going to be gorgeous with the right pot.
Judy,
this is good question :) I think about tilting the tree every time I look on it. Its current position is result of repotting process from 2012. When tree was out of original pot and prepared for new ceramic one I did find out there are 3 possible solutions -
1.cut too much of the root so all will fit the pot, I was afraid to go down this road - did killed too much trees by wrong repotting
2.tilt the tree to one side and keep one big root out or
3. keep out another one. :)
I had few minutes to make decision. I did position tree on one side, checked appearance, looked...doubt...you know and than back, another position...so made decision and potted like you can see now. And, I'm not 100% happy with its position. Simply I cannot say, this is only position good for the tree and it will remain like this. I will see how it will develop, and may be, on next reppoting position will change. Obviously, there can emerge another problems than - with position of branches and so on. Like Buddhist monk in one famous story said "We will see."
About final pot. Also good question, you caught with my pants down. ;) I'm not really good in "choose right pot for tree" game. Maybe I will wait for recommendations from more experienced artist. I'm opened for any recommendations here, even if I do not intend to change pot soon.
Present pot is big, and good from horticultural point of view for the time being.

And I'm adding few more pictures:




 

edprocoat

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Maros I like the pot and the root looks great IMO. It may need the canopy thinned out a bit, it looked to be real crowded in the pics when it was flush with leaves. I assume that is also why the green is forming on the trunk, it would seem that the green moss on the trunk may eventually hurt that bark which would be a shame. In any case its a beautifully unique tree, great job.

ed
 

James H

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Maros your tree is very impressive. I really like seeing the progression photos you posted up. How long have you been working on this tree? I really like the look of the hornbeams. Please keep us posted on this tree.
 

Bonsai Nut

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Hi Maros - I wish I lived somewhere where I could just go "dig up a hornbeam" :)

I think you have two challenges with this tree. First, the secondary trunk is too thick, and second, you have an awkward section of the primary trunk where it is too long and there is little taper.

hornbeam2.jpg

I think you will really want to address these two areas, because as you develop the branches the trunk flaws will just become more noticeable.

I really like this tree!
 

Maros

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It may need the canopy thinned out a bit, it looked to be real crowded in the pics when it was flush with leaves. I assume that is also why the green is forming on the trunk, it would seem that the green moss on the trunk may eventually hurt that bark which would be a shame.
ed
Ed, thanks for your compliments. Regarding canopy, it is fair point, in summer really dense now. On one hand I would like to have good ramification but issue must be solved. Few branches, in top section of the crown will be removed at some point.

Maros your tree is very impressive. I really like seeing the progression photos you posted up. How long have you been working on this tree? I really like the look of the hornbeams. Please keep us posted on this tree.
Thanks James. Tree is in my care since March 2010. So it will be 5 years soon. Still young boy.

Hi Maros - I wish I lived somewhere where I could just go "dig up a hornbeam"

I think you have two challenges with this tree. First, the secondary trunk is too thick, and second, you have an awkward section of the primary trunk where it is too long and there is little taper.

I think you will really want to address these two areas, because as you develop the branches the trunk flaws will just become more noticeable.
BNut, I do not want to go too deep into digging discussion. :) Your and my country have different culture, and different firearms regulation(BTW we have 8.3 registered guns per 100 inhabitants), and free passage through almost entire country and so on :)
But, irony aside, this tree is from quarry which was closed and not used for about 15 years. During this period conditions formed some interesting trees there. All better hornbeams I have, are from this one place (not bigger than 1 km2) collected in 2009-2010. Point is, quarry was re-opened in 2012, and all growth in and around was cleaned. So I basically saved those trees, in case they are not in my pots they could have been turned to firewood.
Regarding your challenges. First one - could be done like you draw it. But it would create even bigger scar on the trunk. I'm not sure it would be beneficial for the tree, but it is possible, and it can improve tree a bit, I agree. Second challenge is real challenge since I do not think it is possible to solve it easily. Of course I can chop the trunk and start all over but my heart will be bleeding if I will do it. :) But, I think in few years when branches will thicken overall appearance of the tree could change and may be it will look more natural and those disturbing elements will not be so obvious. We will see.;)

Adding winter picture after snow hit our area few days ago.

 

Bonsai Nut

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BNut, I do not want to go too deep into digging discussion. :) Your and my country have different culture, and different firearms regulation(BTW we have 8.3 registered guns per 100 inhabitants), and free passage through almost entire country and so on :)
But, irony aside, this tree is from quarry which was closed and not used for about 15 years. During this period conditions formed some interesting trees there. All better hornbeams I have, are from this one place (not bigger than 1 km2) collected in 2009-2010. Point is, quarry was re-opened in 2012, and all growth in and around was cleaned. So I basically saved those trees, in case they are not in my pots they could have been turned to firewood.
Regarding your challenges. First one - could be done like you draw it. But it would create even bigger scar on the trunk. I'm not sure it would be beneficial for the tree, but it is possible, and it can improve tree a bit, I agree. Second challenge is real challenge since I do not think it is possible to solve it easily. Of course I can chop the trunk and start all over but my heart will be bleeding if I will do it. :) But, I think in few years when branches will thicken overall appearance of the tree could change and may be it will look more natural and those disturbing elements will not be so obvious. We will see.;)
Do not take my comments about digging up hornbeam as negative! I truly DO wish I could live somewhere I could dig up hornbeam - they just don't grow around here. I just bought a tiny hornbeam that isn't 1/10th as nice as your tree, and it cost me $90, so I am ENVIOUS!

Yes - it is very easy to create a virt in photoshop that shows a "better" design without taking into consideration what it would do to the tree :) But one thing I have learned with bonsai... tackle the big problems first. You could keep this tree for years - develop AMAZING ramification - and still have that gnarly trunk. You will be happier... long term... if you address it now.
 

Maros

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Do not take my comments about digging up hornbeam as negative! I truly DO wish I could live somewhere I could dig up hornbeam - they just don't grow around here. I just bought a tiny hornbeam that isn't 1/10th as nice as your tree, and it cost me $90, so I am ENVIOUS!

Yes - it is very easy to create a virt in photoshop that shows a "better" design without taking into consideration what it would do to the tree :) But one thing I have learned with bonsai... tackle the big problems first. You could keep this tree for years - develop AMAZING ramification - and still have that gnarly trunk. You will be happier... long term... if you address it now.
BNut, no negativity in sight. :) I wanted to make few comments on collecting and I'm aware this is one of the WMD in forums. There are only few topics which can start flame-war so effectively - collecting, substrates, tradition in bonsai... :) You know what I mean.
Regarding Hornbeam/Carpinus betulus, it is growing in our area like weed, very abundant, most common species after Picea abies and Fagus sylvatica I guess. Usually creates good nebari, and nice muscle trunks. But if you want really nice piece you have to take a lot of walks in forest and have luck. And sometimes dig deep...:)
 

akhater

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Love the hornbeam leaves specially in spring

great looking tree. Wish some day I will have something similar
 

Maros

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It was time to remove wires, so "The Yossarian" tree has been partially defoliated, wires removed and shoots shortened. Few more pictures in blog post could be found here. Here are few recent pictures.





 

sikadelic

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Very nice work!! If you already answered this, I apologize, but how long did it take you from collection to this point? This is inspiring work...beautiful!
 

sorce

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Sux I missed this one!

Nice!

Sorce
 

Maros

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Very nice work!! If you already answered this, I apologize, but how long did it take you from collection to this point? This is inspiring work...beautiful!
Hi Sikadelic,

tree was collected in March 2010. So it is trained as bonsai for 5 years. Still a lot of work ahead, but it is tree which is fun to work with.

Sux I missed this one!

Nice!

Sorce
Thanks Sorce :)
 

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