House Move

AndyJ

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Hey folks.

I had surgery on my back in June in an attempt to fix the long-standing degenerative disk disease issue that I have. It’s not certain to have been resolved and I’ve certainly had no guarantees from the surgeon that it has been but I have been told that the surgery is a stop gap not a cure so it will come back again in the future. My wife and I have decided to downsize our home to something that will be easier for her to manage in the future so I’ve got to start thinking about my trees in the ground.

I’ve got some Japanese Maples, an English Yew, a Scots Pine, a Chamaecyparis Boulevard, a small Hinoki Cypress and an English Oak. We anticipate moving later this year (November / December) and I’d like to take as many of my trees with me as possible. I’ve moved garden shrubs around in autumn many times - it’s often suggested to be the best time isn’t it because of the warm soil - but what about moving ground planted trees into pots? Is it ok to lift everything later in September / October and plant in pots? What compost would you recommend? I’ve seen some folks talk about repotting pines and yews in late summer - does this work or should I just do everything in autumn? Or should I do some of them now?

Many thanks,

Andy
 

AndyJ

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Hey Peace. I’m not sure I’ll be able to time it so that I can lift everything and transplant it within the window between moving out and moving in. I’ve had some of these “trunks” growing now for a few years and really don’t want to lose any
 

HorseloverFat

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Sorry for your plight man. It is hard on us when we find out we can't do what we have always done.
Backs, lungs, hearts etc. , we all get there.
Some of us fry out organs EARLY.
;)

I also feel for OP’s situation..

What kind of “support system” are you working with, Andy?
 

HorseloverFat

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I MOSTLY meant about “grunt-work”!

You appear to be mentally sound enough that I wouldn’t need to inquire about the other.

But if needed, I am always here to talk... this goes for ANY ONE.... seriously.

🤓
 

AndyJ

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Ha ha!! 🤣😂 I am lucky to have three strong sons, Horse, who are all going to be roped in to the grafting! Just don’t know what to lift and when
 

HorseloverFat

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Ha ha!! 🤣😂 I am lucky to have three strong sons, Horse, who are all going to be roped in to the grafting! Just don’t know what to lift and when
I, also, have three sons... 10, 5, and 7 months...🤣 Already, the 10 and 5 year-olds take a portion of my “grunt work”.. they LOVE it.

If your new property has a garage/shed... would it be wise to pull ALL trees after leaf drop, bag them, and stick em in “coldframe”?
 

AndyJ

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I could do that - maybe put them with my eldest son at his house. Will it be OK lifting pines and yews in autumn?
 

Paradox

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I could do that - maybe put them with my eldest son at his house. Will it be OK lifting pines and yews in autumn?

Should be ok yes but you are going to want to either get them back in the ground ASAP or give them winter protection. If you put them in a shed, you're going to have to make sure they don't dry out over the winter. You may not want to wet the floor of the shed.

You could also mulch them against the north (preferably) side of the house, or just place them against the house and bury the root balls
 

AndyJ

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Should be ok yes but you are going to want to either get them back in the ground ASAP or give them winter protection. If you put them in a shed, you're going to have to make sure they don't dry out over the winter. You may not want to wet the floor of the shed.

You could also mulch them against the north (preferably) side of the house, or just place them against the house and bury the root balls

That sounds like solid advice and might be my best bet. The Scots pine and English yew are about 6-7 years old and have started to develop nice trunks and I really don't want to lose them.

Thanks for your thoughts gents
 

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