How do I help my new Chinese Elm heal this scar?

Syltis

Seedling
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Hi!

I just aquired a Chinese Elm from Norways only Bonsai Nursery, Taki Bonsai. I liked the trunk and the slight nebari. I have repotted it and plan to let it grow outside and settle this spring before I start working on the branches when it's leaves drop. The branches has been growing wild, so I am very excited to start cutting away crossing branches and begin forming a broom shape. All in due time.

As happy as I am with the trunk, it has some scarring and there seems to have been some rot as well, due to the tree having been grown in crap soil. Here are photos of the tree and it's scar.

20200416_130732.jpg
20200404_151835.jpg20200404_151807.jpg20200404_151825.jpg

I would love to be able to help the tree heal from this. After reading up a bit, I think an idea would be to scrape away the parts where there is some rot, as well as cut around and inside the scar and apply cut paste.
I am a noob though, so any thoughts and advice is very much appreciated. Also any advice on the tree in general is always fun.
 

Zach Smith

Omono
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Patience. With the tree in good soil, let it grow for the next couple of years and you'll likely be surprised at how good Chinese elms are at healing themselves. Sometimes we want to "help" our trees too much, and they don't reward us the way we think they should.
 

Syltis

Seedling
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Clean and cover with cut paste does help to heal scars.
This cut is only tiny. It will probably heal over in a year without any treatment if you feed and water well this summer.

Patience. With the tree in good soil, let it grow for the next couple of years and you'll likely be surprised at how good Chinese elms are at healing themselves. Sometimes we want to "help" our trees too much, and they don't reward us the way we think they should.

Thank you both for the responses. I think I will give the tree time to heal it self, as I agree that the cut is tiny. I also would not want to damage it any more by trying to help it, due to me being inexpericenced. I will let the tree heal and observe.
I will post an update when the tree has progressed. Again thanks a lot.
 

Davidlpf

Shohin
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Hi.

Simply let it grow.
Chinese elms peel the bark when they grow, so that tiny scar will disappear in a year or two

ulmus-parvifolia-allee-bark.jpg


Cheers!
 

Syltis

Seedling
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Hi.

Simply let it grow.
Chinese elms peel the bark when they grow, so that tiny scar will disappear in a year or two

ulmus-parvifolia-allee-bark.jpg


Cheers!

Thank you for the response. Sure hope my tree's bark looks like that one day.
Have a good one!
 

Shibui

Masterpiece
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Seedlings show a wide range of bark type from the lace bark through to part rough bark and on to true corky bark.
The one posted here does appear have characteristics of the smooth peeling type but it can take years for mature bark type to show so only time will tell.
 

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