How Do You Ground Layer?

just.wing.it

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#1
I am curious as to the specific technique, as far as cutting the bark and cambium....

I've read and seen videos of people doing it different ways, for example....

Stripping off all the bark and cambium all the way around the trunk, similar to an air layer.

Cutting small strips of bark and cambium out.

Only small incisions all the way around.

No cutting, just burying.....?

What is the technical difference between a ground layer and an air layer?....just the fact that it is in contact with the soil surface??....or is there more?

I think I will have some layering candidates this year...or next.

Thanks!
 
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#2
Wing, layering, generically, is the interruption of phloem movement of fluids. It doesn't make any difference where it's placed but specie ability to issue roots at the layer is one of the reasons for differing techniques.
 

sorce

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#3
Ground layer is For a tree in the ground IMO.

The intricate cuts like Smoke makes around the odd shaped base of a potted tree....is an airlayer.

But like KRS says...

You must be aware...
That if your hands are by your sides ...
They're still in the air.

Sorce
 

just.wing.it

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#4
Wing, layering, generically, is the interruption of phloem movement of fluids. It doesn't make any difference where it's placed but specie ability to issue roots at the layer is one of the reasons for differing techniques.
OK, that makes sense...

With that said, has anyone ever successfully ground layered a Taxus?
 
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#6
OK, that makes sense...

With that said, has anyone ever successfully ground layered a Taxus?
While I haven't specifically "ground" layered Yew. I have layered, propagated even with large cuttings and found that they easily produce roots. Ease of "rooting" is one of the indicators of success in layering.
 
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#7
I tried an air layer one, it diddnt take the first year so I left it on thru the winter. It turned lighter green by spring time so I was excited since id read some times the foliage above the layer will lighten up or change color. It then turned brown and died mid summer. So I am definetly of no help to your question. But it was my only try at yew. So I'm still no help. But air and ground are the same technique. Exept one is in contact with the ground
 
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Dav4

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#8
I am curious as to the specific technique, as far as cutting the bark and cambium....

I've read and seen videos of people doing it different ways, for example....

Stripping off all the bark and cambium all the way around the trunk, similar to an air layer.

Cutting small strips of bark and cambium out.

Only small incisions all the way around.

No cutting, just burying.....?

What is the technical difference between a ground layer and an air layer?....just the fact that it is in contact with the soil surface??....or is there more?

I think I will have some layering candidates this year...or next.

Thanks!
One's in the air and the other is close to the ground... identical otherwise.
 

Bonsai Nut

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#9
The biggest mistake I think most people make with layers is that they tend to cut their girdle perfectly perpendicular to the trunk or branch they are layering. This is good practice if you are trying to create a formal upright, but bad practice for most other bonsai styles. It is far better to have an angled girdle, so that you start with a new tree that has movement right at the nebari.
 
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#10
The biggest mistake I think most people make with layers is that they tend to cut their girdle perfectly perpendicular to the trunk or branch they are layering. This is good practice if you are trying to create a formal upright, but bad practice for most other bonsai styles. It is far better to have an angled girdle, so that you start with a new tree that has movement right at the nebari.
Good point...in a few years...I intend to do such a ground layer on the american wisteria. I keep looking to see what angle to do it as. So when potted it has character and the best movement. I have not overly read up on it...since I have a few years. But I hear ones failure is from drying out...so it makes me ponder is there a watering regiment one stands by...to prevent that.
 
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#18
Ground layering for me is close to the ground or pot. No branches or foliage below the layer. Some trees take their time for creating roots and starvation of the rootmass below the layer is possible when no foliage is between layer and original roots. Only layer good growing trees. Weak trees will provide one-sided roots. I layer as the first work on healthy stock. When unhealthy I repot in good mix, wait a few years and then layer. The time you invest early will pay off since you will have better results. You can always style the layer before. I use a pot with akadama and around the ring some sphagnum but not too much. Not succesful with the wire method. One-sided mostly.
 

just.wing.it

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#19
Ground layering for me is close to the ground or pot. No branches or foliage below the layer. Some trees take their time for creating roots and starvation of the rootmass below the layer is possible when no foliage is between layer and original roots. Only layer good growing trees. Weak trees will provide one-sided roots. I layer as the first work on healthy stock. When unhealthy I repot in good mix, wait a few years and then layer. The time you invest early will pay off since you will have better results. You can always style the layer before. I use a pot with akadama and around the ring some sphagnum but not too much. Not succesful with the wire method. One-sided mostly.
So, when you ground layer, you completely strip the bark and cambium layer off, all the way around the tree?

My main reason for posting this question was to see if anyone didn't cut the full girdle, if anyone cuts lines or slits instead....
 
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#20
I've done a few partial (window) removals with less succes in a far past. I came to the conclusion that all or nothing works best for me. You win a good tree, or you lose a bad one, i try to do airlayers as soon as possible in the development because it's not a 100% succesformule. Species that responded well for ground layer are: tilia cordata, zelkova serrata, ulmus parvifolia, carpinus betulus, acer palmatum, acer buergerianum and zelkova nire. Airlayers (with foliage below the layer) : taxus (i don't know if ground layering is an option, never tried it. I had less succes with ground layering fagus sylvatica for some reason. Not a uniform rootbase, so i tossed all of them. I'll have a go at it this year to see if i have better succes now. Tips on layering fagus...? i would like to hear them.