How often do you Daconil????

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#1
Just wondering what others are doing to get rid of fungal disease.
What do you use, and how often do you spray?
 

just.wing.it

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#2
I've used Daconil twice this year, once before buds opened and once since.
I spray in evening after sun is off the trees.

I've used Neem once or twice, those aphids love my crape myrtle.
 
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Orlando, FL
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#7
I use it as directed on everything here in Florida. Especially, and focus driven, on Trident Maples, Pines, Azaleas, and a few other. But since Daconil hurts none of my trees they all get it in the end. Never had a fungus issue.

Needlecast (pines) and Trident maple fungus are huge problems for us here, as are rotting Azaleas. I spray every two weeks, and I add it in with my Talstar or Avid for bugs and maintain a bi-weekly rotation of those two. Spray twice a month and done. This is how it works in my back yard, ymmv. ;)
 
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#8
PS on the subject of Hydrogen Peroxide, I buy a case on Amazon and then just dump it straight 3% right into a spray bottle. Any "new to my garden" tree gets a healthy spray -- probably 20 sprays -- to aid in cleaning the trunk and all the shit off of it. If it "fizzles" then it's killing bad shit. It will not harm your roots. In fact, it's free oxygen for them in liquid form. Spray, scrub, spray, scrub. Rinse, spray, scrub, etc.... It makes life very easy =) With regards to using it as an anti fungicide, I cant make any statement to that because I just use it to clean trees. Especially lime sulphur ones pre-re-sulphuring. Free cleaning, why not! :)
 

0soyoung

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#9
In what proportion, may I ask?
I put 2 tablespoons 3% hydrogen peroxide in a quart of water, which is about 900 ppm. It is effective as dilute as 300 ppm, so I'm confident solutions should be effective even if I've had an opened bottle of peroxide sitting around for several months.
 
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Nashville TN
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#11
I put 2 tablespoons 3% hydrogen peroxide in a quart of water, which is about 900 ppm. It is effective as dilute as 300 ppm, so I'm confident solutions should be effective even if I've had an opened bottle of peroxide sitting around for several months.
Thanks Oso, I’m interested in trying this approach on a couple of deciduous trees showing some minor black spotting on leaves. Living in such a humid place I have recently opted to only let rain touch leaves of deciduous species, even with regard to foliar feeding...maybe I’ve been in too much greenhouse and not enough bonsai.
I am curious, what time of day you do this treatment, and how often? You drench them at night?...before sun??..get under leaves?
 

0soyoung

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#12
I have two plants (a crabapple and a plant that didn't turn out to be a winter Jasmine as represented) who's leaves brown if water drops stands on them - I spray them right after watering/rain. Spraying also seems to help keep camellia and azalea flowers that are exposed to rain/watering-splash looking nice. Otherwise, I spray every few days during spring. Even though it is fairly rainy here, summer is dry and I only spray if I think I see something.

If I ever see something (say, leaf spots that might be rust or maybe needle cast on pines), I remove and discard the affected leaves, then spray. I think sprays can only nix spores on the leaf surface; hence infected leaves are just spore sources.
 
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Florida Keys
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#14
Will the daconil or Hydrogen Peroxide help with Damp off on seedlings? If so do I spray it in the soil before planting or spray the top?
I lost a bunch of JBP's, almost half of what I planted.

Thanks!
 

Nybonsai12

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#15
I put 2 tablespoons 3% hydrogen peroxide in a quart of water, which is about 900 ppm. It is effective as dilute as 300 ppm, so I'm confident solutions should be effective even if I've had an opened bottle of peroxide sitting around for several months.
Oso,
are you cautious to not allow this to drip into the soil? I'm getting off daconil for deciduous trees as I'm starting to believe it may be the cause of seriously stunted growth. I'd plan on trying a few things and will throw yours into the mix.
 

W3rk

Yamadori
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#16
I've used Hydrogen Peroxide anywhere from 25% up to 100% straight in my soil this spring so far with no problems. I used it initially when I had some Fungus Gnats in a couple of Ficus pots' soil, wintering inside. Over time that + reduced watering really did the trick and had no ill effects. I've also used it for the soil of a Maple that had root rot (I had to slip pot it so as not to disturb what new healthy roots it did have). This is standard 3% Hydrogen Peroxide, no ill effects seen.
 

0soyoung

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#17
Oso,
are you cautious to not allow this to drip into the soil? I'm getting off daconil for deciduous trees as I'm starting to believe it may be the cause of seriously stunted growth. I'd plan on trying a few things and will throw yours into the mix.
Stronger peroxide solutions than I use for foliage can be used safely as an in-situ root drench (@milehigh_7 is one advocate of this use). In concentrations of 300 ppm to as high as 0.1%, like I use for foliar spray, it can be safely and effectively used as a repotting root dip as well as foliar spray. So, no, I am not worried about protecting the soil/roots.

The 'advantage' of daconil is that it leaves a residue that can nix incoming sprores for a week or two, provided it doesn't rain (or get washed off by 'overhead irrigation'). This, IMHO, is why it is so widely used in commercial farming. Even though it has low toxicity to humans, my opinion is that there is a risk of daconil accumulation in the soil (if not one's bonsai pot, the landscape in which it is sited/sprayed). This is an infamous problem of copper based fungicides. I really do not know how realistic this scenario is with daconil, but it does little or nothing to bacteria. Peroxide is also an effective anti-bacterial (it used to be the standard disinfectant in first aid kits).

I became a peroxide-ite when @garywood told me of his commercial nursery experiences with ZeroTol (which is hydrogen peroxide plus a 'preservative' that extends the shelf life of the peroxide). I've been using it ever since and have not found any reason to go back (to daconil and the like). Peroxide is far cheaper and far more eco-friendly, and anti-bacterial unlike the 'chemical' alternatives. The caveat with peroxide is that it attacks only what is sitting on the surfaces at the time it is applied.
 

milehigh_7

Mister 500,000
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#18
PS on the subject of Hydrogen Peroxide, I buy a case on Amazon and then just dump it straight 3% right into a spray bottle. Any "new to my garden" tree gets a healthy spray -- probably 20 sprays -- to aid in cleaning the trunk and all the shit off of it. If it "fizzles" then it's killing bad shit. It will not harm your roots. In fact, it's free oxygen for them in liquid form. Spray, scrub, spray, scrub. Rinse, spray, scrub, etc.... It makes life very easy =) With regards to using it as an anti fungicide, I cant make any statement to that because I just use it to clean trees. Especially lime sulphur ones pre-re-sulphuring. Free cleaning, why not! :)
Actually, at that strength you are fortunate. It is a darn fine herbicide.
 

milehigh_7

Mister 500,000
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#19
Will the daconil or Hydrogen Peroxide help with Damp off on seedlings? If so do I spray it in the soil before planting or spray the top?
I lost a bunch of JBP's, almost half of what I planted.

Thanks!
absolutely. :) Peroxide kills anything. It is used as one of the sanitizing agents in tissue culture for which the explants must be 100% free from pathogens.
 
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#20
absolutely. :) Peroxide kills anything. It is used as one of the sanitizing agents in tissue culture for which the explants must be 100% free from pathogens.
Awesome, but when do I spray it? I want to prevent damp off on my JBP Do I spray it into the seed hole? Or just spray the soil on top? Or do I just spray the actual seedling?
 
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