How to collect this red oak?

harvdawg

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Beavers have turned this into a pretty interesting thing! Pics are a little blurry, but u just noticed tonight that this stump isn't dead. What can I do with it? Since the leaves are open, seems I should wait til they garden off to undercut it, then collect next spring before bud break? Keep the beavers off of it too....
 

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Wires_Guy_wires

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In English Oaks I've read that it's advised to collect them when the leaves have hardened off.
That sounded weird and wrong until I did a pre-spring collect and all leaves dropped right after forming. Now I have 6 stumps with 0 growth, some buds here and there that might make it and might not.

I don't know about other oaks, but since the growth pattern is comparable, it might be a good idea to follow the path I refused to take.
 

peh3

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http://www.bonsai4me.com/AdvTech/ATquercus rootpruning and repotting.htm

Here is some more info about collecting / root pruning and to confirm what was said above.

"Along with early June, I believe mid-August to the end of September maybe optimum times to collect English Oak in the UK. During this period, the tree still has plenty of time to recover from collection before the onset of cooler days and nights in October, and of course, dormancy."
"... I now firmly believe that it is advantageous to rootprune and collect Quercus robur during the growing season, when the ground is wet (after rain) and temperatures generally cool (day temps below 25C)."
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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It was exactly there where I found that information. But I'm about to do more digging now they're all in full leaf, if anyone's interested, I'll report back here.
 

Josh88

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This article is changing my upcoming plans. Last week I came across a wonderful spot for collecting some Oregon White Oak that have recently leafed out. I was planning on waiting until next Spring but now I'm thinking I will collect a few in the upcoming weeks as well and see how they respond.
 

daygan

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I'll confirm the information on Bonsai4me does also seem to apply to other oaks. I have collected oaks in both China and the northeast here in the states successfully by following Harry Harrington's recommendations. It's still a bit of an experiment with oaks here in the U.S. because I don't think enough people have attempted to collect the various species for there to be sufficient data to reach a strong conclusion.
 

Josh88

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I’m very curious to see how it goes as we have very wet springs here in the northwest, but summer is very dry, so conditions don’t quite match with the UK’s late summer rains. I’m guessing I will have more luck before our dry months set in but we will see...
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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I gave my collection page an update. The oaks are there.
I forgot to mention that they're in home-blend free draining 'seedling' soil. I'm in luck with the weather; today is a chilly day with lots of rain. Good for keeping them from drying out.
They're placed in the shade (2 hours of setting sun every day) and will have a year to recover in peace.
 

M. Frary

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I'll confirm the information on Bonsai4me does also seem to apply to other oaks
Because red oak and white oak don't make the best bonsai subjects.
Hard to reduce large leaves.
Long petioles.
Neither of them like to have their roots messed with.
 

Solaris

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Neither of them like to have their roots messed with.
And how. One of mine threw a hissy fit over a rough slip-potting. It was out of season, but none of my other trees are that testy.

By comparison, I've had maples, apples, cherries, and burning bush that I pretty much just ripped out of the ground and stuck in a pot. The maples and cherries sulked a little bit if I did it in the wrong season, the apples didn't notice at all.
 

augustine

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Long taproot which will need to be cut in the ground for a few years while you cut around the root ball and I'd bet it could never be collected. However more importantly in Mike Frary's comment - no good for bonsai.
 

rockm

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not worth the effort. Too large, too coarse and even if you do get it out, you will spend another 15 years growing out trunks. This stump is poor material regardless of species.
 
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