How to cut off branches to get a nice heal over?

Saddler

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I am looking for a resource that describes in detail how each species should have a branch cut off to get a nice smooth heal over. It seems that each species has different needs on how to make a fast smooth heal on major cuts and then the particular situation warrants a variation such as a trunk chop verses taking a 90º branch off the trunk of a maple. Which species do you leave a branch stub on for a year? I really want to improve my sacrificial branch removal methods and a resource to look at before I start cutting would go a long way to a nicer looking tree that is quicker to develop into something. I am tired of putting reverse taper into a tree because I trunk chopped and the bark swelled so quickly around the cut.

I can't seem to find anything that delves into the details of the problem any more then a crude picture for a species or two. If anyone knows of a corner of the internet I can go to cut my error rate down, I would be very grateful.
 

Saddler

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Thanks, that is a nice advanced technique, but what I am looking for is more basic knowledge for different species.
 

ConorDash

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Thanks, that is a nice advanced technique, but what I am looking for is more basic knowledge for different species.

To be honest, I'm not sure there are specifics of how to prune in terms of scarring, for each species. There are of course some but not specific to every.
For example maples, most would say don't prune in spring or summer as they bleed a lot.
Elms on other hand, prune very frequently for directional pruning.

What species did you have in mind? Or did you just want a 1 stop shop for all pruning, all species, all the time? Cos if you find that.. let me know!!
 

Dav4

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As a general rule, with conifers, cut branches back and leave a stub as Jin. With deciduous trees, I cut branches flush and seal with duct seal. I've done the above successfully for years with multiple pine species, multiple juniper species, yew, multiple maple species, ume, hawthorn, quince, cherry, and crab apple.
 

sorce

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I know what you mean...
And I understand your frustration.

Gotta start with a sharp saw and a clean cut.
The work has to be done...
I been dremeling and hand sanding edges.

Unfortunately....

I believe it is lack of excellent growth that makes it a Bitch.

Add North.

Sorce
 

Saddler

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[QUOTE="ConorDash, post: 459973, member: 20000"

What species did you have in mind? Or did you just want a 1 stop shop for all pruning, all species, all the time? Cos if you find that.. let me know!![/QUOTE]

A one stop shop is what I am hoping for. If I find it, I will let everyone know.
 

Saddler

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As a general rule, with conifers, cut branches back and leave a stub as Jin. With deciduous trees, I cut branches flush and seal with duct seal. I've done the above successfully for years with multiple pine species, multiple juniper species, yew, multiple maple species, ume, hawthorn, quince, cherry, and crab apple.
thanks, I have wondered about using duct tape. Is it to give the swelling something to press against and keep flat or just for protection to help heal faster? What about branches on the outside of a bend? Leave a"bump" that matches the radius of the curve? Cut it flat and no duct tape?

What are the advantages/disadvantages of cutting at different times of the year? What causes swelling and how do I know I can cut before/after what causes it?
 

Spdyracer

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thanks, I have wondered about using duct tape. Is it to give the swelling something to press against and keep flat or just for protection to help heal faster? What about branches on the outside of a bend? Leave a"bump" that matches the radius of the curve? Cut it flat and no duct tape?

What are the advantages/disadvantages of cutting at different times of the year? What causes swelling and how do I know I can cut before/after what causes it?
Pretty sure he's not talking about duct tape but rather a duct putty. It comes in a bar shape and is a thick grey putty.
 

Dav4

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Pretty sure he's not talking about duct tape but rather a duct putty. It comes in a bar shape and is a thick grey putty.
aahhhh, I see! Thank you for the clarification. I had no idea such a thing existed.
 

M. Frary

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Yeah, that'll work too:).
I should start using something to seal cuts.
Working with mainly elms though I don't really see the need since they heal over fast.
To th he o.p.
The quickest way to heal over a scar is to leave the branch collar. The problem with that is it leaves a bump. So in bonsai we use concave type cutters to actually leave a cut that goes deeper than flush. It lets the bark fill the indentation made from scooping out the wood while cutting.
I also don't mind scarring on a tree. It shows struggles of survival.
Kind of like all of the scars I've accrued in my fight for survival.
 

Dav4

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Drying/non drying, hard/elastic, paint on, water/oil based, latex/synthetic, or just cheap lol
The comparison to silly putty wasn't far off. The duct seal product looks and feels just like the imported putty sold in the little tubs. It works just like the silly putty, is easy to apply and remove, and stays pretty pliable though it does dry a bit after a few months. I'm sure there's something similar in your neck of the woods.
 

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