How To Get Rid Of The Flies/Nats On My Tree

Z06Bonsai

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Ive done a bit of searching around on google and found the best way is slices of raw potatoes. The flies will lay the larvae on the potatoes.

Will this method work?
Is there a better way?
 

RyanFrye

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Ive done a bit of searching around on google and found the best way is slices of raw potatoes. The flies will lay the larvae on the potatoes.

Will this method work?
Is there a better way?
Are they located indoors?
 

RyanFrye

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You will most likely battle the flies as long as your trees are in doors. I think it may be due to a lack of air flow. I'm not sure of the exact cause, but you will also likely have to deal with a moldy fungus (not sure what it's called).

The best remedy is to put them outside for as long as your climate will allow.
 

Bill S

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Could be fungus gnats, they are often drawn to over watered trees, if the soil isn't drying down you speed up the composting of the organics in your soil.

If so I am guessing you water on a schedule(i.e. every morning) it's not always easy but try to only water when the tree needs it.
 

Z06Bonsai

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Could be fungus gnats, they are often drawn to over watered trees, if the soil isn't drying down you speed up the composting of the organics in your soil.

If so I am guessing you water on a schedule(i.e. every morning) it's not always easy but try to only water when the tree needs it.
I try and water it every other day. The person that I bought it from watered it alot. Ive had the tree about 2 weeks. Im trying to dry it out more then the original owner did so the roots dont rot.

On the bright side the tree has alot of new leaves and they seem to be alot smaller then the other dark green leaves which means its getting sufficient light I would assume.


Does the potato thing work? The flys like the potato and lay their larvie on the sliced potato. Then I just throw away and repeat until they are gone. The heat index is 104 on average lately so I dont think its a good idea to put it outside.
 

RyanFrye

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The heat index is 104 on average lately so I dont think its a good idea to put it outside.
If I recall you mentioned on another thread that it was a ficus. Right? Ficus thrive in heat and humidity. If you've ever been to Miami Florida you'd see what I mean. They are everywhere! And they have huge canopies and lots and lots of ariel roots. So give it a shot and put it outside. Ultimately you'll be glad you did.
Start it out in some shade and then gradually move it into more sun. It will definitely produce smaller leaves and it will be fuller than it would be by keeping it indoors all the time. If you want a serious looking bonsai it really needs to spend most of its time outside.
 

Bill S

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What kind of tree is it and where do you live, important info to help you out.

The heat index thing isn't a big deal if other plants live outside, depending on species it's probably best to be outside, and air circulation is important, it also helps dry dpwn the soil.
Speaking of soil, whats in you pot, this could be the biggest part of the problem.
 

Z06Bonsai

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Im not sure whats in the soil but it looks like soil from the earth/multch type mix.
What kind of dirt should I use? mariacle grow stuff at walmart?

The tree is a yan shen ficus and in live in texas (were having a hotter then normal month this year with actual temps around 100 and heat indexes around 105-110).

The person I got it from claims it has always been an inside tree so I am reluctant to sticking it outside in the heat. Maybe a gradual approach would be better?
 

rockm

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What you have is a ficus. Forget the "yan shen" part. It has no meaning beyond being a marketing name to make it seem more "Asian" to the buyer.

It is probably a benjamina, or more likely a retusa or possibly another kind. Doesn't make that much difference. Ficus species are commonly used for mass-produced bonsai. All ficus species are tropical and can withstand the heat in Texas. Both are commonly grown outdoors in Texas. Both are healthier outdoors in Texas.

I'd ignore what the seller told you to do as far as care. They don't know what they're talking about. Some sellers of mass-marketed bonsai rarely know anything about their actual care, as they don't care for them. They buy from a big mass-producer in Asia or even locally--and SELL them.

Watering on a set schedule is the WORST way to care for a bonsai and one of the most common causes of death for them. Water should be given WHEN IT'S NEEDED. The idea of letting the soil dry down a bit is a good one.

If I were you, I would put the plant outside in a place where it gets direct morning sun for four hours or so and receives afternoon shade. Get a good ficus bonsai book and read
 
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Bill S

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What rockm said, also our club just had Rodney Clemmons in for workshop and lecture( great guy to bring in to your clubs by the way, entertaining, and knows his horticulture, has a great presentation) he said down in HotLanta they will sometimes water with warm/hot water for trop's that LIKE heat, brings the root temps up to what the trop's are used to in thier native habitats. Make me think now that if it's inside it's probably getting the cold shoulder from your AC, most trees don't like that. too cool, and too dry.
 

Z06Bonsai

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What kind of tree is it and where do you live, important info to help you out.

The heat index thing isn't a big deal if other plants live outside, depending on species it's probably best to be outside, and air circulation is important, it also helps dry dpwn the soil.
Speaking of soil, whats in you pot, this could be the biggest part of the problem.
its organic soil. what would you recommend that I use instead of this soil?
Can I get the miraclegrow soil at walmart?
 

Bill S

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Most will have more organics in thier soil for tropicals, I add a bit more in the pine bark area to the basic bonsai soil mix. If you need to ask what that is I would suggest contacting bonsai nurseries closest to you and talk to them about what works well for your area, you are hotter that I am up here in Massachusetts.

I have seen in a couple of places where the mix was less organic, and typical free draining soil, the idea was that the roots would get more finer feeder roots if the soil was kept drier. Any clubs in your area? Info from a local club should be the best info you can get. Worst case get a hold of Dallas Bonsai and pick thier brains.

Going back to soil, I would skip the Walmart stuff, and do a search for soil mix/soil recipies on the bonsai forums, and read read read, bottom line is you have to find out what works well for your specif location.

Where to get it you ask, well you were going to ask weren't you, check bonsai retailers, Dallas Bonsai as mentioned before, Shady Side Bonsai, Bonsai Ideals, all sell a quality soil mix. Check also the link section right here on the Bnut.

A good source would also be to give Irene B a pm and see what she suggests, she is also down in the oven you guys call home.
 
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