parhamr

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IMG_9789.JPG
IMG_9788.JPG

It's 8 feet long, 12 inches deep, and 18 inches tall. The total material cost was about $75 for this bench, and I have materials for five more benches. Some of the coming benches will be taller and twice as deep. I've intentionally put money into the lumber—select tight knot grade Western redcedar—so they're durable and don't require weatherproofing. I want these benches to develop a weathered color and texture.

I was variously going for a fundamental, natural, elegant, and balanced design. I'm not wild about the feet.

The top is attached with five, six-inch carriage bolts. The frame is attached with four, six-inch lag screws.
 
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ghues

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Looks good, nice wind break too. The feet would appear more balanced if you had placed them parallel with the bench?
 

ysrgrathe

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Nice work. The feet might be less visually imposing if you used 2x6 instead of 2x12.
 

Jarath

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Awesome wood working. I agree with the feet being parallel with the bench.
 

CWTurner

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The height of the feet are important only to allow for attachment to the upright posts. I would redo them, ripping the 5/4" x 6" in half (5/4" x 3") and make them a little longer as the bench seems a bit tippy to me. Definitely do not align the feet with the bench top.
Nice simple, clean design otherwise. Good fence too.
CW
 

wireme

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View attachment 121069
View attachment 121070

It's 8 feet long, 12 inches deep, and 18 inches tall. The total material cost was about $75 for this bench, and I have materials for five more benches. Some of the coming benches will be taller and twice as deep. I've intentionally put money into the lumber—select tight knot grade Western redcedar—so they're durable and don't require weatherproofing. I want these benches to develop a weathered color and texture.

I was variously going for a fundamental, natural, elegant, and balanced design. I'm not wild about the feet.

The top is attached with five, six-inch carriage bolts. The frame is attached with four, six-inch lag screws.
Nice wood. You may find that the top board will cup on you in dry weather. You could include some horizontal 2x4s across the bottom of the board for future benches if it's a problem. That one will want to curl down at the edges and up in the middle, trees might get rocky. The end grain of a board tells you which way it will cup, curved grain wants to straighten.
 

parhamr

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Nice wood. You may find that the top board will cup on you in dry weather. You could include some horizontal 2x4s across the bottom of the board for future benches if it's a problem. That one will want to curl down at the edges and up in the middle, trees might get rocky. The end grain of a board tells you which way it will cup, curved grain wants to straighten.
That's helpful and makes sense. Thanks!

I'll correct that in the next generations.
 

GrimLore

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I would put some spacers under your colanders. It will allow them to drain better and make your bench last longer.
true...

I was variously going for a fundamental, natural, elegant, and balanced design.
I have those 3 1/4 x 12 barn timbers and I put bamboo chopsticks under most all of the pots. It adds function allowing air flow underneath and eliminates a lot of critters from parking under them. The stream function on the Dram also makes it easy to blast anything under the pots away.

IMG_0767.JPG

Grimmy
 

parhamr

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:confused: WTF!?:p

Looks good!

Will you remake the feet?

Sorce
The 5/4" boards are sized such that they can be finished with a joiner, plane, or mill and come out as a true, 1" dimension.

I will likely just treat this bench as a one-off and make improvements to future generations. If the feet bug me enough then I'll fix em up ;)
 

parhamr

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Bench #2 is done:
IMG_9992.JPG

Approximate costs: $120 in wood and $30 in fasteners. I am still using "select tight knot" redcedar, lag bolts, and carriage bolts. This bench took about five hours in total construction time.

Dimensions: 8' long, 3' tall, and 2' deep.
IMG_9984.JPG

I think I've corrected for some of the oversights in my first bench—this version should be more resistant to cupping and warping. I'm still planning to skip treatment and coatings to let natural weathering take its course.

IMG_9980.JPG IMG_9981.JPG
IMG_9991.JPG

I've left enough space for a lower shelf, which I expect to add in this upcoming week.
 
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petegreg

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Very nice, clean, but a little expensive. Have you considered a railway wood to use?
 

abqjoe

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Bench #2 is done:
View attachment 123728

Approximate costs: $120 in wood and $30 in fasteners. I am still using "select tight knot" redcedar, lag bolts, and carriage bolts. This bench took about five hours in total construction time.

Dimensions: 8' long, 3' tall, and 2' deep.
View attachment 123729

I think I've corrected for some of the oversights in my first bench—this version should be more resistant to cupping and warping. I'm still planning to skip treatment and coatings to let natural weathering take its course.

View attachment 123730 View attachment 123732
View attachment 123731
Overkill, I like your style:)
 

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