ID needed please!

raydomz

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Last night was our local club auction and since the price was right, I picked up this elm.
No one at the meeting could ID the tree for certain so I thought I'd ask here.
It is about 12" tall with a base about 4-5" in diameter.




Thanks!
 

rockm

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It's an elm...:eek::D Without knowing the history of the tree, it could be a number of things....However, given that it looks collected and your location, I'd bet on Siberian Elm (ulmus pumila)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulmus_pumila

Can be unstable as bonsai, as this species drops branches with little notice or reason...
 

raydomz

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Oh no, I was thinking the same.
That might help explain the dead section at the top(not noticable in the photo).
Looks like I might just have to hope for the best with this one.
 

tanlu

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Very awesome trunk!!!! Although I've heard negative reports on using them for bonsai, there are some beautiful specimens.
 

edprocoat

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To me that looks like a Sawtooth Zelkova, its a Japanese tropical elm. I am almost sure that is what it is. They need lots of sun and warmth and can be grown indoors too with good lighting.

ed
 
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Its not Zelkova serrata(Japanese Grey Bark elm). By the way not tropical as it is fully deciduous and in fact almost the last to come into leaf. Leaf and bark is wrong.

Do you mean Zelkova sinensis?

I think it is an elm but which one? Ulmus procera; English elm which does look like the Siberian elm but with larger leaves.

Grant
 

edprocoat

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Grant the reason I think its a Sawtooth zelkova is the size of that trunk looks like its pretty old. The Sawtooth or serrata is grey bark when young and then it sloughs or sheds off with age and exhibits an orange brown look. I seen both those colors in the pictures and the leaves look very similiar to the sawtooth zelkova. Also the sawtooth is deciduous but is also a tropical zone tree requiring bright sun and warmth, they will keep leaves through winter indoors with proper light, they also tend to get the yellow leaves and brown spots on the leaves as in his picture when lighting is not enough to sustain the leaves. But I have been wrong once or twice in my life, or maybe I was just mistaken. :D

ed
 
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Hm,

It is a tough one. Zelkova serrata.We have a full grown one in our neighbourhood dating from 1964 and it is still fairly smooth and grey.

One in our bonsai collection date from 1951 but also is still smoothish and grey.

Someone will know for sure in the flesh; the pictures are very good but it is still difficult sometimes.

Grant
 

rockm

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"To me that looks like a Sawtooth Zelkova, its a Japanese tropical elm. I am almost sure that is what it is. They need lots of sun and warmth and can be grown indoors too with good lighting."

There are no "tropical elms." Elms are temperate zone trees and do best outdoors. Zelkova is definitely an outdoor species. Zelkova serrata (Japanese grey bark elm) is hardy to zone 5 to 8. It will die if kept inside. I keep my Zelkova in full sun all summer and mulch it into the garden in the winter. Some elms, notably Chinese elms, may limp along inside by and large, but the vast majority eventually die if kept there.

I don't think this is a Zelkova. Leaves aren't right and the bark isn't either. http://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/plant.asp?code=A927
 
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Brian Van Fleet

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Agreed Rockm & Grant...that's not a zelkova.

Siberian Elm most likely, based on location, bark, and leaves. I've worked on a bunch of these in Iowa, and have had no problems with them as bonsai, but if it starts dropping branches, cut bait!
 

raydomz

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Thanks for all of the input guys. I'm onboard with it being a siberian elm at this point. I have a zelkova and while similar I would not call it the same.
I'll get some better pictures tonight.
 
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Hi all,

What is the problem with the Siberian elm?

Is it related to all elms; elms suscetptible to Dutch elm disease or just specific to the Siberian elm?

Grant
 

Brian Van Fleet

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I haven't had a problem with Siberian Elms, and I've worked plenty, but haven't owned one in 12 years or so. They seem to have a reputation for losing branches, but that hasn't been my experience. If anything, they seem to be forgiving, easy-to-train, bud back not quite as well as Chinese elms, and pout after repotting just like all the other elms. Less susceptible to Dutch Elm. If they were common in my area and I found an interesting one, it would come home with me. :p
 

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