ID on What Might Be Going on with Crepe Myrtle

Apex37

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I've had this guy for probably a little over a month now. Repotted him as soon as I got him into a 1:1:1 mix of pine bark, akadama, and pumice. He's showing signs of some sort of bacterial or fungal issue I'm guessing. I REALLY hope this isn't bacterial leaf scorch, but from what I've been reading, it kind of matches.

Any idea what might be going on?
 

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Apex37

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If the soil is that coarse throughout I'd guess too little water.

Sorce
What kind of soil should I have planted it in? I tried to use some organic.

It's been sitting out in a 2 day rainstorm and I try to water daily.
 
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Too much water and too little water can give the same look on some trees. Not sure about crepe myrtle, though I’ve three of these. Are the pale tips progressing?

From what you are saying and the symptoms, I’d go with too much water at this time of the year.

One thing you as a quick fix can do is to chock up one side of the pot to lower the internal water table, it’s something we do most of the spring out here.

cheers
DSD sends
 

sorce

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What kind of soil should I have planted it in?

Lol!

Nah, I don't think it's a case of wrong soil so much as wrong watering.

Though this mix may prove too coarse for future use.

I have a theory about boxwood's yellowing leaf edges, that they turn yellow due to too much work(transpiration). Not too much water, or too much sun, but basically too much of both.

This mix may be doing the same to your edges.

Sorce
 

bwaynef

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Too much water and too little water can give the same look on some trees. Not sure about crepe myrtle, though I’ve three of these.
Too little water on a CM will have the leaves wilting. Watering once you see wilt will have them sprung back up how they're supposed to be pretty quickly. I don't recommend it (letting them wilt) as a course of action though.
 

Apex37

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Not sure how I never saw these replies!

He's been looking better! I moved him to an area that gets less evening sun. Sun like 9-3. Got some new growth. I'm wondering if I should cut him back or just let him go. He could use some actual branching so figured I'd leave them to grow.
 

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Zach Smith

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It's not uncommon for Crapes to look unhappy right after repotting during the growing season. Usually this corrects itself after two or three weeks. In the meantime, it's not uncommon to look for the most exotic plant disease you can think of when your tree doesn't shrug off the stuff you do to its roots as part of the normal course of bonsai development. Repotting with root-pruning is usually stressful to any tree you might name. Some show you clearly that the stress has occurred; others behave in a more subtle way. Pretty much all trees take some time after root-pruning to get back into a healthy growth pattern. This can take anywhere from a few months to a year or more. Patience is not always easy to practice in these situations. FWIW.
 

Apex37

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It's not uncommon for Crapes to look unhappy right after repotting during the growing season. Usually this corrects itself after two or three weeks. In the meantime, it's not uncommon to look for the most exotic plant disease you can think of when your tree doesn't shrug off the stuff you do to its roots as part of the normal course of bonsai development. Repotting with root-pruning is usually stressful to any tree you might name. Some show you clearly that the stress has occurred; others behave in a more subtle way. Pretty much all trees take some time after root-pruning to get back into a healthy growth pattern. This can take anywhere from a few months to a year or more. Patience is not always easy to practice in these situations. FWIW.
I'm in no hurry. :)
I just have had a couple trees suffer already this year and trying to learn from mistakes and catch them (if there are any) early. I find looking at my trees daily is helpful.
 

Zach Smith

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I'm in no hurry. :)
I just have had a couple trees suffer already this year and trying to learn from mistakes and catch them (if there are any) early. I find looking at my trees daily is helpful.
Yes, it's good to keep an eye on your trees daily. With that said, you should resist the urge to do things to your trees daily. They will not thrive if you love them too much. Benign neglect is a valuable and underappreciated tool for the bonsai enthusiast (I can honestly say I've gotten the best growth on my trees when I've been away from them for a week of vacation). I guess the message is, look but don't touch :cool:
 

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