Identification Help

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I have the opportunity to collect a few of these shrubs, they have decent trunks and great looking foliage, but I have been unable to ID them as of yet. A little help?


Thanks,


Will
 

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It seems to have a compound leaf arrangement. I wonder how the ramify?
 
I have the opportunity to collect a few of these shrubs, they have decent trunks and great looking foliage, but I have been unable to ID them as of yet. A little help?

Hi Will,
This is what I believe to be a Trumpet Vine (Campsis radicans), also known as "Cow itch vine. I have been cultivating one for a couple of years and can proudly say I have the largest one in bonsai cultivation. That is because no one else wants to mess with these. :) They are really fast growers and there branches can not be trained (extremely brittle) with wire once they start to turn woody. So get them going in the right direction while the shoot is green. That or clip and grow. A feature to this plant/tree is that its wood is fairly hard and dense. Unlike other vines such as wisteria. This wood does not punk when exposed.

I'll post pictures next....having technical difficulties
 
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Now for the pictures
 

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Will , I've had trumpet vine in four different houses and found it to be somewhat like rosemary on steroids. I couldn't kill the stuff and it was hard as hell to train ( even though it was only being trained onto a wall or over an arbour ). The leaves you posted and those Tom posted are very similar but they don't look identical to me. Is the plant a vining monster ?
 
I thought it looked like an oak too...but I think it is Fagus sylvatica 'Laciniata'...Cutleaf Beech. Try it on Google Images and see what you think...I included one image below. The typical beech buds have probably not formed yet as it is still early in the season.
 

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Hi Will,
This is what I believe to be a Trumpet Vine (Campsis radicans).....

I originally thought this too Tom, but the alternative leaves threw me off...although this species has a opposite first set of leaves, the rest are alternative.


Nice examples you have there, and I do like those flowers, ever get humming birds visiting?


Will
 
I thought it looked like an oak too...but I think it is Fagus sylvatica 'Laciniata'...Cutleaf Beech. Try it on Google Images and see what you think...I included one image below. The typical beech buds have probably not formed yet as it is still early in the season.


By George, I think you nailed it! Thanks, I'll take a closer look today at the shrub and do some research on this species, thank you.


Will
 
Hi Will,
This is what I believe to be a Trumpet Vine (Campsis radicans), also known as "Cow itch vine. I have been cultivating one for a couple of years and can proudly say I have the largest one in bonsai cultivation. That is because no one else wants to mess with these. :) They are really fast growers and there branches can not be trained (extremely brittle) with wire once they start to turn woody. So get them going in the right direction while the shoot is green. That or clip and grow. A feature to this plant/tree is that its wood is fairly hard and dense. Unlike other vines such as wisteria. This wood does not punk when exposed.

I'll post pictures next....having technical difficulties


Tom, I have a couple as Bonsai as well.:p
Irene
 
After some study based on the information BonsaiRic gave, I am certain these trees are European Cut Leaf Beech, Fagus sylvatica 'Laciniata'.

Thanks for all your help!



Will
 
yep......... looks like you have a tree on your hands ;)
 
It's nice when I guess right sometimes. ;)
I haven't seen many Cutleaf Beech bonsai. They should be an interesting and unique addition to the world of bonsai! Keep us posted!
 
Wow, there's no fooling you, huh? :rolleyes:
You know Will, as it has been explained before, sometimes it is better to avoid an incident, than creating one.

I'm glad you were able to identify the appropraite species, now you have a good foundation to make a sound decision.
 
I wish Beech were more common in the Bonsai nurseries in my area. It seems like most of the ones I've seen on the net, are people in Europe.
 
A lot of bonsai growers avoid Beech, they are fussy and do not respond the same way many of the more common bonsai species do. For one you cannot defoliate them and they have only one growth spurt a season. Because of this they are slow to ramify and produce smaller leaves.
 
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