If you had to choose

milehigh_7

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Ok you all, let's try again to get a discussion going.


If you were forced to choose just one species to work with, what would you pick?

Why?
 

Bob

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I'd go with a Dawn Redwood.

They survive well in my climate, easy to deal with for someone of my experience level, and they remind me of the greatest trees that I have ever seen in person. Sequoia.
 

Mojosan

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That's a tough one. Pines can be used in probably the most varied ways to produce trees of vastly different character. But because of where I live, they are also very, very common. (They are literally everywhere!)

I would go with Maples. Easy to grow, grow fast, beautiful trees.
 

Attila Soos

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Trident maple.
The reason is that it has great roots for bonsai culture. They fuse together easily, creating the best nebari and root-over-rock.
 

JasonG

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My favorite species is Mt Hemlock...the foliage is second to none and one of the most amazing trees I have seen.

But for bonsai, I would have to say that the Mt Hemlock is a close second to the Ponderosa Pine. I would choose collected ponderosa pine because of the contorted nature, excellent deadwood, great bark and the power these trees contain. They are also easy to bend or move very thick branches and are extremly tough species. About the only way to kill one is to burn it!!!!

So for me it would be pine.

Jason
 

AlainK

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Japanese larch : it's both a conifer and a deciduous tree, and I like trees that change throughout the seasons.
 

king kong

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Jabotacaba because they can be grown from seed, their fruit is to die for, and their bark (skin) peels leaving a persimmon and tan trunk that will blow you away.
 

emk

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The first bonsai I ever tried my hand at was a shimpaku, so I have a nostalgic fondness for them as well.
 

king kong

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Well, this thread only proves that you can lead a horse to the water but you can't make him discuss.
 

onlyrey

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Something appropriate to your climate (humidity, yearly temperatures). In your case something that would resist dryness and the type of summer/winter you have. In my case, here in Florida a tropical tree, most likely Black Olive.
 

Bonsai Nut

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(1) Japanese maple. So many varieties to chose from, relatively forgiving, and stunningly beautiful throughout each season.
(2) Shimpaku juniper. Easy. Fun. Quick results.
(3) Japanese Black Pine. Difficult. Slow. East to mess up - forever :)
 

king kong

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How could I forget Bucida spinosa. One of the best bonsai I ever saw was a Bs. Tiny leaves, massive trunk, twisted branches, perfect structure and now..............it's dead.
 

TheSteve

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Hi all. I'm new here but for what it's worth my choice is definately pine. Lodgepole or JWP but definately pine.
 

milehigh_7

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Well, this thread only proves that you can lead a horse to the water but you can't make him discuss.
LOL Kong! Tis the season for craving anything bonsai and the boards are completely dead. So I have been trying to get some discussions going.

I don't know enough to make any provocative statements or bring a strong opinion on things so I was hoping to hear everyone extol the virtues of their favorite material.


Helps me learn. ;-)
 

subnet_rx

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Since you said species and not a particular type, I guess I'd have to go with a juniperus chinensis. Second would be japanese black pine because there are a lot of varieties there to work with as well.
 

M.B.

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I can't just pick one. I'd have to say elms, maples, and olives are my favorites at the moment. Why? They do well in my climate with minimal fuss.
Mary B.
 
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