If you've removed wire that was just starting to cut in....

Mike Corazzi

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............and the wired branches seem very solidly moved, will they still try to lift with growth?
Or...I guess the real question is should wire be removed or replaced?
 

Melospiza

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I usually remove the wires if there are bite marks and I need them to heal. Replacing is useful if i need further bending but want to avoid deep bite marks.
 

River's Edge

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............and the wired branches seem very solidly moved, will they still try to lift with growth?
Or...I guess the real question is should wire be removed or replaced?
It Depends!
On the goals for wiring! Do you wish change of direction and movement but wish to avoid scarring?
Are you looking for a rugged ancient look and some scarring will add to that effect in time?
What species are you working with and how does it respond to wiring!
Did the branch move when you removed the wire?

For example Hemlock often require wire in position for several years to get branches to hold in position and the sweeping style does not lend itself to bite marks and disfiguration so retiring is the order of the day.
Yes new growth tends to grow up and that either creates the effect you want or it requires further work. Wiring or Pruning as desired!
The answer lies in the goals of the practitioner and the response of the tree. Variables!
 

Adair M

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It Depends!
On the goals for wiring! Do you wish change of direction and movement but wish to avoid scarring?
Are you looking for a rugged ancient look and some scarring will add to that effect in time?
What species are you working with and how does it respond to wiring!
Did the branch move when you removed the wire?

For example Hemlock often require wire in position for several years to get branches to hold in position and the sweeping style does not lend itself to bite marks and disfiguration so retiring is the order of the day.
Yes new growth tends to grow up and that either creates the effect you want or it requires further work. Wiring or Pruning as desired!
The answer lies in the goals of the practitioner and the response of the tree. Variables!
And, for many species, wiring is a continual thing. New growth happens. And new growth usually grows upwards towards the sun. So, after wiring, the wired growth may be in the correct (or desired position) but new growth needs training. So, on comes the wire!

Now, some of the old growth gets wired again, just to provide an anchor for wiring the new growth. Some parts of the tree that are positioned well might not need any wire. Only wire where necessary to shape whatever needs to be positioned securely.

Over its lifetime, a JBP might always have wire on it, but the trunk might get wire early in its life, where as after a few years, the trunk mo longer needs it, but the fine twigs do.
 

Mike Corazzi

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Shoulda been more explicit. It's a Sylvestris and the ones I unwired are fairly thick branches.
They did NOT move when I clipped the wire. That was my yardstick. I was gonna rewire if any of them sprung up even a little bit.
I know I'll have to continue to wire the skinny ones as they develop.
I was just wondering about thicker (1/2" and up) branches that I have positioned over the years with HEAVY wire. Those guys didn't even twitch when freed.
I did ...initial....wire on a branch I wasn't pleased with this morning. Just a minor redirection but it made a big difference from the front of the tree.
:)scots1.JPG
 

sorce

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What really depends is the amount of hardwood built inside the branch that was wired and if subsequent growth of outer more layers will be stronger than it.

A baby shoot that built a toothpick worth of hardwood inside will be easily lifted by next year's growth which will be much stronger.

An Old branch with already thick interior wood will spring back until the new growth is stronger than the old woods spring back.

The shoots in between those extremes will set the fastest.

So.

The Hemlock then, must have highly springy old wood and weak exterior tissue?

Whereas something that sets "easy" has weak or non springy Heartwood and strong external tissues.

There must be a real optimal time to wire then.

I believe 2-3 year old growth should set the best, since these extremes will be balanced.

Resorce.

Sorce
 

River's Edge

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What really depends is the amount of hardwood built inside the branch that was wired and if subsequent growth of outer more layers will be stronger than it.

A baby shoot that built a toothpick worth of hardwood inside will be easily lifted by next year's growth which will be much stronger.

An Old branch with already thick interior wood will spring back until the new growth is stronger than the old woods spring back.

The shoots in between those extremes will set the fastest.

So.

The Hemlock then, must have highly springy old wood and weak exterior tissue?

Whereas something that sets "easy" has weak or non springy Heartwood and strong external tissues.

There must be a real optimal time to wire then.

I believe 2-3 year old growth should set the best, since these extremes will be balanced.

Resorce.

Sorce
The timing suggested is consistent with the pattern i prefer for developing trees from scratch generally! Some species must be wired on the new growth such as Chojubai. Good explanation as to the mechanics of why wiring a branch can change the direction or movement.
 
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