I'm new to bonsai. ID and best care.

EmptyLake

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So i bought it today and i kinda know what kind it is (label) but when i googled it said that the specie has many subspecies so i can't really look up any care guides. Thanks in advance!
Bonsai01.jpgBonsai02.jpg
 
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atlarsenal

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Not much need for a care guide on privet. They are pretty much bulletproof. Just set it outside and watch it grow. It would probably grow in nuclear waste although I would get in some better soil next spring.
 

EmptyLake

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Not much need for a care guide on privet. They are pretty much bulletproof. Just set it outside and watch it grow. It would probably grow in nuclear waste although I would get in some better soil next spring.
I see. About watering i read somewhere that you should water it once a week by putting the whole pot underwater for 15 minutes which sounds a bit odd to me so that or just regular watering when the soil gets dry?
 

just.wing.it

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I see. About watering i read somewhere that you should water it once a week by putting the whole pot underwater for 15 minutes which sounds a bit odd to me so that or just regular watering when the soil gets dry?
No need for all that.
Your microclimate, will determine watering needs.

I water my privet twice a day this time of year.
 

Michael P

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Push you finger into the soil a centimeter or two. If it feels dry, water. Even though it is summer, my guess is that Finland is still pretty cool. I doubt you will need to water more than several times a week. Watering by submerging the pot will work, but is unecessary. You can just water from the surface as you would for any potted plant.
 

penumbra

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At first I thought this was Lugustrum lucidum which was a hugely popular landscape plant when I was a boy in Fairfax Virginia. But the wavy leaf indicates Ligustrum japonicum which is very similar. They are only a couple of the plants in the privet group which contains over 50 species. Most privet that we see are deciduous but these are evergreen. They are zone 7, so not as hardy as the deciduous varieties that are often growing wild. You will need some winter protection where you live. Both leaves and berries are poisonous, however a dark strong flavored honey made from its flowers is popular in Germany. They are sweet smelling though not necessarily a pleasant smell and attract bees profusely. During the 1960's a few colder than average winters killed most of them that had been planted as foolproof, tough as nails landscape plants. I remember this very well because I was working my first real job at a landscape nursery. I would cut branches and plunge them into the soil and they would root.
As a bonsai they should be very tough but they are anything but elegant so it will take some work. Keep them on the drier side. The leaves are not small but not huge and I don't know if they reduce as bonsai.
 

EmptyLake

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At first I thought this was Lugustrum lucidum which was a hugely popular landscape plant when I was a boy in Fairfax Virginia. But the wavy leaf indicates Ligustrum japonicum which is very similar. They are only a couple of the plants in the privet group which contains over 50 species. Most privet that we see are deciduous but these are evergreen. They are zone 7, so not as hardy as the deciduous varieties that are often growing wild. You will need some winter protection where you live. Both leaves and berries are poisonous, however a dark strong flavored honey made from its flowers is popular in Germany. They are sweet smelling though not necessarily a pleasant smell and attract bees profusely. During the 1960's a few colder than average winters killed most of them that had been planted as foolproof, tough as nails landscape plants. I remember this very well because I was working my first real job at a landscape nursery. I would cut branches and plunge them into the soil and they would root.
As a bonsai they should be very tough but they are anything but elegant so it will take some work. Keep them on the drier side. The leaves are not small but not huge and I don't know if they reduce as bonsai.
What time of the year would be a good time to cut a branch or branches and plunge them into the soil? Also any tips on using for example iron wire to guide the growing?
 

TN_Jim

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I have collected 3 or four of these -seems there is nothing I can do to kill them & I’ve been pushing the boundaries of seemingly reality with them.
That said this is the most vicious plant in my region. It’s invasiveness literally decimates native habitat everywhere. Hating it as I do I will continue to try to beat the enemy into shape, & NEVER let it flower. Gremlins yo
 

penumbra

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What time of the year would be a good time to cut a branch or branches and plunge them into the soil? Also any tips on using for example iron wire to guide the growing?
You could try cuttings now or very early spring. That was 56 years ago and I think it was end of winter / early spring. As to styling, there is much to do and right now is probably not the best time.
 
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