Indian Hawthorn Styling Options

CapeFear盆景

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I collected this Indian hawthorn from a business changing their landscaping. I have 4 that I have collected and all are in different stages of budding. This tree has the most buds and the most interesting trunk.

I’m considering splitting the twin trunk into two making a bunjin and informal upright from this tree.

I’ve had it in this basket since collection and I’m waiting until the new branches elongate but I’m not sure how to proceed with styling.

Any feed back would be much appreciated.
 

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sorce

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Welcome to Crazy!

I wouldn't split it...cuz then you have 2 trees with lopsided roots.

I would let it grow out for a while and consider layering off the 2 parts with good radial root systems.

These are so pretty.

Sorce
 

CapeFear盆景

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Welcome to Crazy!

I wouldn't split it...cuz then you have 2 trees with lopsided roots.

I would let it grow out for a while and consider layering off the 2 parts with good radial root systems.

These are so pretty.

Sorce

Thanks for your feedback. Since I have a few of these trees doing well I’ll experiment with that.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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I have a few thoughts.
1. - I would rotate the pot 180 degrees. Lets get a good photo from the back. Reason is, normally you want the trunk(s) leaning slightly toward the viewer. It is a design technique that creates the illusion of a taller tree, gives one the sense that they are looking up into a tall tree. Viewed as "more friendly" rather than "shying away". Japanese might say the tree "bows to the viewer". Now it is not an absolute rule, but when in doubt, I have found following design conventions usually leads to more attractive tree. If you really like seeing the tree from this side, experiment by propping the pot up at different angles, see if propped up so the right hand trunk leans toward the viewer looks better.

2 - Similarly - experiment with tilting the pair to the right maybe another 15 degrees. Photo attached is tilted to right exactly 15 degrees. I might go a little more, but when tilted to 30 degrees, that was too far, made the 'V' symmetrical, which should be avoided for other visual design rules.

When you repot, bury the nebari deeper, at least as deep as the red line. This way new surface roots will form on the tops of the ugly roots and eventually yield an interesting, not completely radial nebari.

The "classical ideal" bonsai has a perfectly symmetrical, radial nebari, where the roots come off the tree like spokes of a bicycle wheel. Some really like it, some find it too stylized. Actually, it is quite difficult to achieve such a nebari. But a consistent beginner mistake is to expose the root system, expose the nebari too early in a tree's development. The nebari is something you look at while repotting, but then bury at least 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep until the tree is in late stages of development. Only when a tree is near exhibition ready do you expose the nebari. Even though every time you repot you look at it, cut off crossing roots and otherwise train the roots every time you repot, then bury it until the tree is really ready for exhibition. Exposing a nebari will result in a tree that sits on a "volcano" shaped cone of roots with gaps and spaces where there should be roots to fill in. Once the "volcano of roots" forms, it takes many years to correct. Bury the roots now, and the problem won't form, or won't get worse, in the case of this tree.
 

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Leo in N E Illinois

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But seriously, I would consider making the back of the tree the front. Post a photo of the back if you like.

Indian hawthorn - Rhaphiolepis indica - is a nice species for sub-tropical bonsai. I do love using flowering trees for bonsai. I posted the botanical name because many of our members might not be familiar with the common name. If you know the botanical name for a species, it is helpful to use it at least once in a thread, that helps to avoid confusion. For example the common name Hawthorn usually refers to the genus Crataegus. If you don't know the botanical name of a tree, usually someone, like myself will volunteer the name just to keep it clear which species we are talking about.
 

CapeFear盆景

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But seriously, I would consider making the back of the tree the front. Post a photo of the back if you like.

Indian hawthorn - Rhaphiolepis indica - is a nice species for sub-tropical bonsai. I do love using flowering trees for bonsai. I posted the botanical name because many of our members might not be familiar with the common name. If you know the botanical name for a species, it is helpful to use it at least once in a thread, that helps to avoid confusion. For example the common name Hawthorn usually refers to the genus Crataegus. If you don't know the botanical name of a tree, usually someone, like myself will volunteer the name just to keep it clear which species we are talking about.
Thank you for all the feedback I’ll bury the roots and see if it pushes new roots. I have it growing in a basket with lava rock in the bottom and pine park compost. I’ve attached a picture from the time I collected until now. I’ll post a photo from the back soon.
 

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CapeFear盆景

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Here are some more picture from the back and the sides. I think you are right, the back might make a nicer front. The taller part of the tree also has an interesting trunk curve.
 

CapeFear盆景

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Pics
 

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CapeFear盆景

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Still pushing new buds all over.
 

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CapeFear盆景

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Finished this years styling. If anyone has any suggestions for future styling I would appreciate it. This thing back buds like crazy so it’s not hard to regrow any branch. 3F9D9BEB-5358-42DC-9C59-7D53018BFD71.jpeg
 

CapeFear盆景

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I decided to chop the lower trunk and fill the gaps in the roots with some rocks. Currently regrowing branches.
 

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