Interesting idea I had for a planter, fair warning I’m a little crazy so may be a terrible idea

Trenthany

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I was straightening up a pile of cypress logs I pulled off the river at work and found this log. I think I could use it as a pot. I’m thinking a linear cypress forest similar to a raft but done with my recently acquired seedlings. I’ll go over them in a separate post but as a rough idea I’m thinking a dome shaped silhouette with some trees leaning forward some back etc. If that’s a no go what about a single tree? I thought it would be interesting to use this cypress trunk I have as a pot. For cypress trees, kind of phoenix from the ashes effect. I’d only be using about half the area of the log and was contemplating rocks or chunks of other cypress logs to block ends of planting area (the area that will obviously hold soil, I’m not ready to do a slab at all!) or possibly leaving them open (which makes me think slab effect and I’m scared! Lmao).

As I am writing this, these are what I think I need help on:
1. Will it look remotely attractive?
2. 1 tree or forest idea?
3. Is the concept viable?
4. close the ends of planting area, or leave open?
5. What to use to close planting area if I do.

Any feedback will be appreciated hopefully I’m onto something interesting. 🤞🏻🤞🏻🤞🏻F7129D79-6BB9-4075-9608-91FED650E944.jpegED7C325E-514D-4C83-86D1-BD2A1159829C.jpegE6753908-B0D9-442C-A3C1-757BA3619CA6.jpeg0452AD96-87DE-4947-ABF9-AA4336DB1AF9.jpeg4BF3B825-CA9F-4F3A-B5D7-3463870BAEB5.jpeg0E3863B0-21D0-4C8F-8807-E766C63DCF04.jpeg
 

NOZZLE HEAD

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Big fan of the idea, and the bulldog.

I’d leave the ends open and contain the media with moss and maybe some other natural materials (rocks, bark)

I think these non traditional containers look better with more a “wild” style of tree.

Any thoughts on this?

 

Trenthany

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Big fan of the idea, and the bulldog.

I’d leave the ends open and contain the media with moss and maybe some other natural materials (rocks, bark)

I think these non traditional containers look better with more a “wild” style of tree.

Any thoughts on this?

I’m too new to know what would work good. I’m thinking slow slow grower or perhaps keep it trained in a pot insert that would be removable. You could cover the edges with moss to hide them. Thin wall pvc with holes drilled all over perhaps?
 

NOZZLE HEAD

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I’m too new to know what would work good. I’m thinking slow slow grower or perhaps keep it trained in a pot insert that would be removable. You could cover the edges with moss to hide them. Thin wall pvc with holes drilled all over perhaps?
It is a common practice to grow out a tree in a shallow training pot and when the root mass is enough to hold the soil remove from the pot and put it on a stone slab, blend the edges of the root mass, add a little soil and cover the whole mess in moss to hold things in place.
It would work for the log. Using a log shaped training pot.
 

Bonsai Nut

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I think the only potential downside is how quickly the log would rot in an environment of constant moisture. At the bare minimum I would consider drilling drain holes so the log doesn't become a swamp. You might consider coating it with a penetrating epoxy first, which would provide some protection from rot.
 

Crawforde

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I work in swamps with cypress logs and stumps that are sitting in the water, and have been for at least 15 years, and they are still intact. Mind, these are nutrient poor systems with wild diel pH fluctuations so woody decomp is slowed, but You should be good for at least a little fun for a few years with that.
 

Trenthany

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I think the only potential downside is how quickly the log would rot in an environment of constant moisture. At the bare minimum I would consider drilling drain holes so the log doesn't become a swamp. You might consider coating it with a penetrating epoxy first, which would provide some protection from rot.
It was just coated!
 

Trenthany

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I work in swamps with cypress logs and stumps that are sitting in the water, and have been for at least 15 years, and they are still intact. Mind, these are nutrient poor systems with wild diel pH fluctuations so woody decomp is slowed, but You should be good for at least a little fun for a few years with that.
Mine are all collected from the river and last 20-30 years with no preservation so far without having plants. The soil moisture will speed it up but hopefully my coating will save the wood and get me to that 10-15 year range.
 

rollwithak

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I’m too new to know what would work good. I’m thinking slow slow grower or perhaps keep it trained in a pot insert that would be removable. You could cover the edges with moss to hide them. Thin wall pvc with holes drilled all over perhaps?
Would make a rad “forest” type of grouping.
 

Trenthany

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Here’s my concept. The trees will be cut in the spring to give the visual appearance of a cypress dome. TBH I’ll probably air layer a lot of those tops because they’ve got the beginnings of decent movement on some of them.
 

Trenthany

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Oops photos failed again. Here they are and planted. Makes me think of cypress on a river bank so I’m very happy!25CF09BF-FA00-473F-9336-2AA51DC71C44.jpegC52E921F-0644-48FE-BCB6-DC64D649ECB5.jpeg
 

Michael P

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I love this piece of wood, and think a forest is perfect for it. And I love the idea of a bonsai cypress dome. But I'm not sure the wood and the dome go together.

Cypress domes are usually surrounded by a very flat landscape, and it is is the contrast between that flatness and the dome shape that gives aesthetic interest. This would call for a very shallow pot or a slab. Your wood suggests a landscape of undulating hills, with a lot of negative space on the right side--not exactly cypress dome territory.

Whatever you decide to do, I'm eager to see it!
 

Trenthany

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No major root work just scraped a little dirt off and dropped in with fresh soil. Big prune and roots this spring then let it grow for a couple years with maybe wiring some branches
 

Trenthany

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I love this piece of wood, and think a forest is perfect for it. And I love the idea of a bonsai cypress dome. But I'm not sure the wood and the dome go together.

Cypress domes are usually surrounded by a very flat landscape, and it is is the contrast between that flatness and the dome shape that gives aesthetic interest. This would call for a very shallow pot or a slab. Your wood suggests a landscape of undulating hills, with a lot of negative space on the right side--not exactly cypress dome territory.

Whatever you decide to do, I'm eager to see it!
This is a good point. But it’s kind of mixed. Maybe when I do spring work I’ll reconsider my proposed cuts.
 

Joe Dupre'

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Big fan of the idea, and the bulldog.

I’d leave the ends open and contain the media with moss and maybe some other natural materials (rocks, bark)

I think these non traditional containers look better with more a “wild” style of tree.

Any thoughts on this?



Pretty much what I thought , too. I've thought about doing that myself. Just a heads-up. Bald cypress is rot resistant.......not rot proof, so the log will come apart at the seams in a few years.
 

Trenthany

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Pretty much what I thought , too. I've thought about doing that myself. Just a heads-up. Bald cypress is rot resistant.......not rot proof, so the log will come apart at the seams in a few years.
Definitely. I soaked it in a “safe” sealer from my local paint shop. They really got into the idea of finding the right sealant that would be plant friendly, soak in, and look natural. I’ll have to take pics of some of the cypress I’ve pulled out of the river. Some lasts a long time some doesn’t. This piece has the density to be a long lived piece and when I do repots I’ll reseal it just to help it last. If I get 10 years I’ll be extremely happy and I have other logs I could move my little forest/raft to when it does start to break down if I want to keep it that way. It may move to something different.

Bill’s Bayou did a giant slab planting that this could transfer to quite nicely. Flex a curve into it and use it as an edge as it wraps around to the other side. Another long term 20+ year idea I had was a water garden with bonsai scattered in it either on the ground, root over rock, or on stands or all three. My thought was with enough rock glued together, I could make a water feature that flowed through a planting. And for cypress or swamp maples which I’m already starting to tag that moisture would be a huge bonus.
 
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