Is it possible?

just.wing.it

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Is it possible to strike cuttings of Juniper indoors over winter?
I have a small area with lights for my tropical trees and I have a few Juniper cuttings from a landscape plant that I wanted to try and grow.
Is it worth a shot?
I was gonna plant them in Turface since it holds water forever, and sit them inside with the tropicals over winter.
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penumbra

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I understand that junipers root best outside in a cold frame over winter, preferably with gentle bottom heat.
But I really do hope you are successful.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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I've done it. But not with great success, maybe 1 in 5.
Haven't been able to root them outdoors over winter.

Do treat against spider mites though! They love the good ole indoor.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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Do try to get them as close to the lights as possible. They love bright white LED's.

But slow to root and even harder to establish well after that. I think they get accustomed to indoor high humidity and superior care compared to outdoors. Bleaching is a problem too, that's how I lost my own cuttings: they went outdoors in the full sun too fast.
 

just.wing.it

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Do try to get them as close to the lights as possible. They love bright white LED's.

But slow to root and even harder to establish well after that. I think they get accustomed to indoor high humidity and superior care compared to outdoors. Bleaching is a problem too, that's how I lost my own cuttings: they went outdoors in the full sun too fast.
I just did a quick paper test for mites....found one. I'll use the Bayer stuff when I get them home today.
 

Colorado

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Yes. Did this last winter successfully with a couple itoigawa cuttings. I put a glass mason jar over top to preserve the humidity, like a tiny little greenhouse.

Fun horticulture project, pain in the ass and not worth it for large scale IMO. I’ll be waiting for the growing system to do bigger batches of juniper cuttings.
 

just.wing.it

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Yes. Did this last winter successfully with a couple itoigawa cuttings. I put a glass mason jar over top to preserve the humidity, like a tiny little greenhouse.

Fun horticulture project, pain in the ass and not worth it for large scale IMO. I’ll be waiting for the growing system to do bigger batches of juniper cuttings.
I hear ya... thanks.
Yeah, I just happened to see this one today, I like how the foliage looks....no idea what type of juniper it is, but figured I'd try.
 

just.wing.it

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I make them inside plastic water bottles they make perfect mini-greenhouses, put them in a warm very luminous place, pomice and perlite mix works fine
Sound like a good plan.
I will be sure to either bag them, or utilize bottles like that.
Thanks!
 

penumbra

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I just did a quick paper test for mites....found one. I'll use the Bayer stuff when I get them home today.
That Bayer stuff is not a mitacide. They might claim some success but I wouldn't count on it.
 

sorce

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Just soak em for a day then plant em!

Water over Chem!

It'll work.

Sorce
 

Dav4

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According to Michael Dirr, the best time to take and attempt to strike Juniper cuttings is after the donor plant has received at least a few frosts and freezes. He breaks down his success rate timing wise in his Manual on Woody Plants but I believe January and February were good months to try. I've had loads of cuttings strike taking them at that time and just sticking in a container of potting soil and putting it under the benches with no winter protection here in N GA.
 

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