Is Peter Adams JM book still up to date?

Clicio

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After reading many posts here endorsing Adams book on Japanese Maples, I will buy the paperback version book for sure.
But...
There are some purchase options in Amazon concerning the 2006 edition, being sold for U$ 100 plus, while newer editions are being sold for U$ 30.
Is the 2006 edition so special? Is it still up to date (regarding soils, mostly)?
And...
There are two different book covers (see below), do they have the same content, or are they two different books?

Screen Shot 2018-04-20 at 10.49.02.jpg

Screen Shot 2018-04-20 at 10.48.45.jpg
 

Bonsai Nut

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I have the 2006 edition... and I can't honestly say why it is more expensive except that it is hard cover and out of print - therefore people ask for more money for their copies.

I can't really comment on any newer editions because I don't know what has been changed...
 

rockm

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I have both. I haven't looked at them in quite a while, but I wasn't struck by any big differences when I bought the second one. I think its a case of the publisher putting a new suit on the old book...
 

yenling83

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The books great, but IMO certain advice is outdated. Soils are definitely outdated. Check out Mirai live stream for better info.
 

GrimLore

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Is it still up to date (regarding soils, mostly)?
For the record his book on Flowering Bonsai is spot on except substrate WHEN compared to modern substrate.

Having said that his soil recommendations in that 1999 publication work just fine here - flip a coin!

I will however point out I have extensively tried both here and found after a few years that organics work best for growing, modern substrate for final development and rooting cuttings... Just my experience and don't mean to start a soils war for certain. The important thing with organics is proper drainage...

Grimmy
 

Clicio

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...found after a few years that organics work best for growing, modern substrate for final development and rooting cuttings... The important thing with organics is proper drainage...
I believe that.
It's more work having to check the watering more often, there is always the possibility of overwatering, but..
When people say that organics are used for growing tropicals around here, and they thrive, the war is declared.
 

theone420

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You could always curl up with a electronic notepad or phone under that tree and watch videos and take notes with your pencil. its just the medium for today's society. Why let great information pass you by because it uses a new method of getting the information to you. We all know there is bad information out there, but it is easy to find instructional videos by people that are respected by the bonsai community(like https://live.bonsaimirai.com/). You often wont see a book by these people because the information can be shared much easier and faster with visual videos to follow online. Just the way the world is turning and if you want the most up to date information that is where it will be. I understand the charm of a book, and a lot of things dont change on how to grow a plant, but you may catch something in the video (visually) that you may not get from the book.
I'm not saying dont use the book (I have several too) just saying dont forget about the videos
 

rockm

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You could always curl up with a electronic notepad or phone under that tree and watch videos and take notes with your pencil. its just the medium for today's society. Why let great information pass you by because it uses a new method of getting the information to you. We all know there is bad information out there, but it is easy to find instructional videos by people that are respected by the bonsai community(like https://live.bonsaimirai.com/). You often wont see a book by these people because the information can be shared much easier and faster with visual videos to follow online. Just the way the world is turning and if you want the most up to date information that is where it will be. I understand the charm of a book, and a lot of things dont change on how to grow a plant, but you may catch something in the video (visually) that you may not get from the book.
I'm not saying dont use the book (I have several too) just saying dont forget about the videos
The problem for a lot of people looking for information online is that "respected" sources CAN be dimwits--Not talking about Neil or the big names, but just take a look at the post on dumb bonsai videos. All of those people LOOK like they know what they're doing (with a few exceptions), but they haven't really got a clue. They just have a camera, some spare time and mostly inflated sense of their abilities.

Beginners and even those with enough experience to be dangerous haven't been doing bonsai for all that long and can't make an accurate assessment of the thousands of "instructional" videos, websites etc. that have sprung up online . Additionally, many of the "masters" such as Ryan Neil deal primarily with old collected conifers and not many deciduous trees (because those trees are in style at the moment), leaving a gap for those interested in deciduous trees.

Books (although some are pretty outdated on stuff like soil and technical stuff) don't really have a big problem with that. A publisher has to invest money in a book and generally don't pay for things that are complete horsehockey. Peter Adams books are primarily about the artistic end of things, which is more timeless than shifting understanding of soils and techniques. He had one of the best "eyes" for bonsai design to come along for deciduous trees and especially maples.
 

theone420

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@rockm - That is why I made sure to say "respected by the bonsai community" and then posted an example. it is a good idea to ask for names of those that are respected before you go believing YouTube bonsai tutorials. and checking the comments can help a lot to thin out the idiots.
and like I said I still use the books too but often these books are written over a span of 20 years and what worked 20 years ago may have been improved(sure it still works but it could be better) and the only way to know that is to follow online or wait 10-20 years to read in a book what people are doing today.

But you are right I should not ASS-U-ME others know to be cautious about online tutorials and they should be careful who they listen to. Thank you for making that clear

With all this being said is there a thread somewhere that points out good instructors/blogs to follow for online tutorials to be sure we are getting the best info available by instructors that can be trusted?
 
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