Is this tree dead?

robert.m

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Hey I was wondering what type of bonsai this is and if it is dead.

thanks :)
 

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Zach Smith

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It's a juniper, and it's almost certainly dead. Junipers die slowly, which is why they are one of if not the top commercial "mallsai" sold worldwide. By the time you've had it for a week, month or longer and see the browning foliage, it has been dead for some time but retained green foliage long enough for the sale to be completed. Sad. Consider trying again, but only if you have an outdoor space you can site your tree. Bonsai, for the most part, are not to be kept indoors.
 

robert.m

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It's a juniper, and it's almost certainly dead. Junipers die slowly, which is why they are one of if not the top commercial "mallsai" sold worldwide. By the time you've had it for a week, month or longer and see the browning foliage, it has been dead for some time but retained green foliage long enough for the sale to be completed. Sad. Consider trying again, but only if you have an outdoor space you can site your tree. Bonsai, for the most part, are not to be kept indoors.
Thank you for your response. I have only had it for a week so I guess I bought it when it was dead. Is it possible to grow a bonsai outside in the winter? Are there any bonsais that can be grown indoors? I am new to this and don’t really know how to take care of a bonsai. Do you think I should try returning it?
 
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Thank you for your response. I have only had it for a week so I guess I bought it when it was dead. Is it possible to grow a bonsai outside in the winter? Are there any bonsais that can be grown indoors? I am new to this and don’t really know how to take care of a bonsai. Do you think I should try returning it?
As far as indoor you'll want to look at tropical trees but even then they'll do better outside in the summer.
The outdoors during winter question depends on your climate and what species tree. Unfortunately all of us find out the hard way this is way more complicated than we thought. If you add your location to your profile though it would be easier to give advice.
 

robert.m

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As far as indoor you'll want to look at tropical trees but even then they'll do better outside in the summer.
The outdoors during winter question depends on your climate and what species tree. Unfortunately all of us find out the hard way this is way more complicated than we thought. If you add your location to your profile though it would be easier to give advice.
I live in Ontario and it snows here in the winter. Are there any other types of cool plants I can grow inside?
 
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Most pines will take cold pretty well and are still alot of fun. Otherwise it's tough to generalize. I'm pretty far south of you but there are definitely some people further north that could give you some more specific successes. A good place to start is to find out what is native to your area and see if it is bonsaiable. Generally big leaves are an instant no for bonsai though.
Edit : sorry I thought you said outdoor at first. @amcoffeegirl has a good portion of them, indoor bonsai wise that I know of.
 
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I live in Ontario and it snows here in the winter. Are there any other types of cool plants I can grow inside?
Yes for starters try Jade, here are two examples both young. On the left is Crassula Ovata and on the right Crassula Gollum.88A2FDE0-2C66-48B3-8754-BB72B5C5B9D8.jpeg
They will grow well in morning to mid day light and there is much to learn visually about the biology of this tree for a beginner specifically regarding plant transpiration.

Once you know you can grow those well do some homework and find a thornless Brazilian rain tree. FBDF6E63-D523-49AE-B090-4902CCDB5446.jpeg
This is a small cutting, in my experience they like obscured light all day or hidden in a corner or between two shading objects, only getting full sun from 1:00-2:30pm. They burn in morning and mid day window light.

Once you are comfortable with them try a Ficus tree and a Carmona retusa. They are often recommended as starters, but in my experience they will test your indoor green thumb. Good Luck!
 

amcoffeegirl

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Wow! That unreal! And those are full spectrum lights?
6500 t5ho bulbs x4
I prefer the white bulbs while others do pink or other colors. I use 6500k on my aquariums too. Although some of those are LED.
 

Zach Smith

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Thank you for your response. I have only had it for a week so I guess I bought it when it was dead. Is it possible to grow a bonsai outside in the winter? Are there any bonsais that can be grown indoors? I am new to this and don’t really know how to take care of a bonsai. Do you think I should try returning it?
Temperate zone trees stay out all winter in areas that don't get as cold as yours. So yes, if you plan to grow local deciduous trees they will definitely need to be outside but protected in the root zone in winter. As for indoor growing, there are many species that do well including most of the ficuses, portulacaria afra and others. As a beginner, you may encounter some difficulty at first with indoor growing as it is not where beginners should start. Good advice above.

To answer your other question, we can't bring dead trees back to life. Way above our pay grade.
 

Bonsai Nut

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Is it possible to grow a bonsai outside in the winter?


Let me simply add... you live in Ontario. Look out the window, and if you see a tree species that is healthy and thriving (whether native or an import), that species can be grown outside in winter. However because we are keeping the trees in pots, we have to be a little cautious about the roots. Make sure that the soil never dries out, and make sure that the roots are not subjected to swings in temperature (like when the day is above freezing and the sun is warm, but the night gets brutally cold). The ground is a great insulator, so simply placing your trees on the ground (instead of on a shelf) will help significantly. Some people mulch their trees on the ground as further protection. Snow is also a great insulator - as long as it sticks around.
 
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Mapleminx

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If you have any doubts as to whether a tree is truly dead, scratch the trunk/a branch with your fingernail. If it’s still green beneath then it’s alive.
 

Clicio

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If you have any doubts as to whether a tree is truly dead, scratch the trunk/a branch with your fingernail. If it’s still green beneath then it’s alive.

It's not a sure way, it depends upon the species. I do not hurt a tree that is either very weak or dead, as it will have to deal with the wound. If it's alive of course!
 

Mapleminx

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It's not a sure way, it depends upon the species. I do not hurt a tree that is either very weak or dead, as it will have to deal with the wound. If it's alive of course!
A fingernail scratch is not a deep wound, it‘s just a small shallow knick to get below the surface and will heal quickly by itself. True it probably depends on species and age but on a younger tree it’s quick and simple and was the way I was taught by another bonsai person.
 

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