Japanese Beech

n8

Shohin
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This is a Japanese white beech (Fagus crenata) that I picked up from a lady in Sacramento over the summer of 2019. She was reducing inventory and I purchased a JBP, a Torulosa and a Sierra juniper before heading out to visit a friend for the day. Not wanting to leave the trees in a hot car, I planned on going back to her house to pick them up on the way back home. When I returned, this beech caught my eye and, while it was a little out of my combined price range for the day, I went for it. Got a great deal on all four plants and when opportunity knocks...

This tree was imported from Japan in the late '90s and had been passed around a bit in the Sacramento area. There are some big scars that I have been working to close up. I have done a little bit of wiring and some basic pruning to keep the branches in check. And I've been trying to keep it alive. The Central Valley is not an ideal location for a beech as it gets way too hot in the summer. So far so good, although shadeageddon certainly tested me this summer and the tree limped through the final heat of 2021 with seriously sun damaged foliage. I should be OK going forward with a shade structure.

December 2019

Dec 2019.jpg


February 2020

Feb 2020.jpg


June 2020

June 2 2020.jpg

January 2021

Jan 2021.jpg

May 2021

May 2021.jpg
 
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n8

Shohin
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Here are pictures from today. Normally bronze leaves would still be hanging on, but as mentioned, late summer was not kind this year. Most of the damaged leaves had already dropped and I plucked the remainder today. As you can see, the big scars have been slowly healing, and while they will never be "perfect," they're on their way to closing. I will fill in some of the big cuts with Kwikwood this spring and the plan is to be more aggressive with shaving the wounds to promote more healing for the next couple of years. Now that I've got a bit of a handle on its growth habits I'm going to work on tightening up the branches as a few are starting to get a little leggy.

Another concern is poor healing on a chop that was done near the top of the tree (third picture below). The top and side of that scar are doing well, but the bottom bulge has rotted and will need carving out. Will work on that in the spring, too.


IMG_8680.jpg IMG_8681.jpg IMG_8683.jpg IMG_8682.jpg
 

Shogun610

Omono
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Nice Beech , that lower left branch looks weaker than second branch(unless it’s just the angle of the shots) , do you plan on bulking that one up?
 
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Brian Van Fleet

Pretty Fly for a Bonsai Guy
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Definitely worth having one in the collection, but they are slow and challenging.

I would be tempted to ignore the lower scar as long as possible. It doesn’t stick out too much yet, but once you start carving, there’s no hiding it ever again.

Best of luck.
 

n8

Shohin
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Nice Beech , that lower left branch looks weaker than second branch(unless it’s just the angle of the shots) , do you plan on bulking that one up?

Correct! It is much weaker. What techniques would I use to encourage it?

Definitely worth having one in the collection, but they are slow and challenging.

I would be tempted to ignore the lower scar as long as possible. It doesn’t stick out too much yet, but once you start carving, there’s no hiding it ever again.

I do enjoy the tree quite a bit. Incremental improvements are fine by me and I'm learning a lot by working on it.

I believe as done as much as I can for the lower scar, shaving just the edge of the wound repeatedly over the past two growing seasons. It's nearly there. The others all still have a ways to go.
 

n8

Shohin
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Buds are opening, so it's time to fix this ugly chop.

IMG-9072.jpg IMG-9071.jpg

Cut the bulk out with a hand tool and then smoothed with the Dremel. Expose cambium to stimulate scarring/healing. Apply cut paste. (Will smooth that out when it dries.)

IMG-9073.jpg IMG-9074.jpg

Profile looks much better from the front without the cut bulge, but it is also seems more obvious. Maybe that's me because it just happened. What are you going to do... Big ol' 1½" scar that will take a decade to heal.

Did I do everything right? (Besides using the wrong color paste.)
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Good luck. Never was able to get mine to close.
 
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n8

Shohin
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Good luck. Never was able to get mine to close.

I know it'll be a long road, but reckon I had to cut out that rot. As you can see, there are multiple scars on this tree. I've been exposing the cambium each spring since I've had the tree and they close up a tiny little bit each growing season. This is a big one, obviously. The big one on the front on the bottom is almost there.

Here are some others on the tree that have closed (prior to my ownership):

IMG-9084.jpgIMG-9083.jpgIMG-9082.jpg
 

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