Japanese Black Pine Farm

Bonsai Nut

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I thought I had more photos of this place, but I could only find two more of black pines. This is the same farm of which I recently posted all the white pine photos. Here are a couple of black pine shots. Very impressive; look at all the trimmings on the ground :)



 

Tachigi

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I knew I recognized that blue house. How not only a lot of clippings. Thats also a lot of bar branches. Plating is awesome on this tree. Thanks Greg
 

Graydon

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Oh my... look at that trunk!

Thanks for the posting Mr. Nut!
 

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Ashbarns

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Awesome pine and because of the bar branches this could be destined as a landscape tree. Thanks for the views Greg.

Ash
 

Bonsai Nut

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I was a little mystified by this tree. Supposedly this tree has been under development for "3 generations" (60 yrs?). Why would you look at all those bar branches for 60 years?
 
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jbp farm

bonsainut
you have any more pics ?
especially the sumo tree graydon pointed out.
art rodriguez
 
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That's the problem with photos like that. That could be anything in the background blending in with the trunk of the tree.
 
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Okay, I spoke too soon. Upon enlarging the photo, it does look like the trunk.
 

Attila Soos

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Regarding the bar-branches, here is what I suspect it happened:

When the tree was younger, those branches were not bar-branches. They may have been about 1-1.5 inches apart. You can see a lot of Kukufu-ten winning, formal upright pines, where the branches are not bar, but still very close to each-other.

But as the tree got so big, the trunk and branches increased in size (may be tripled), so now the difference in level, between the opposing branches became hardly distinguishable. It could be that the previous generations were planning for a big tree, but not THIS big. When growing in the ground, it is much harder to control the increase in girth, of a tree. Eventually, these trees will lose their correct proportions, designed for being a bonsai.
 

Graydon

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Regarding the bar-branches, here is what I suspect it happened:

When the tree was younger, those branches were not bar-branches. They may have been about 1-1.5 inches apart. You can see a lot of Kukufu-ten winning, formal upright pines, where the branches are not bar, but still very close to each-other.

But as the tree got so big, the trunk and branches increased in size (may be tripled), so now the difference in level, between the opposing branches became hardly distinguishable. It could be that the previous generations were planning for a big tree, but not THIS big. When growing in the ground, it is much harder to control the increase in girth, of a tree. Eventually, these trees will lose their correct proportions, designed for being a bonsai.
Sure, that and the fact that last time I looked there are bar branches on trees in nature.

We could also assume that the grower is a grower (not the final artist) and they are leaving as many branches so that the final lucky owner has the options to select from and then remove the unwanted ones. I can assume the purpose of some of these branches is to continue to add girth and taper to these trees.
 
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