Japanese Greybark Elm

paddles

Yamadori
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I have a japanese greybark elm that I've had for a few years, and 18mths ago slipped :eek: when triming it and did some damage:eek: :( I planted it in the garden to recover, and it's growing merrily, now its a very young tree, only 4-5yrs old at most, but I was wondering if I should just let it grow on for a bit, or weather I should consider lifting it next winter? it's young as I said, and time in the ground won't hurt it, however when I put it in the ground, cause I didn't know better, I just planted it, with nothing to restrict root growth, will it be ok to leave it there longer? should I trim the top? I've just ignored it except to feed and water it.
 

Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
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Any photos?
 

Gnome

Mame
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Paddles,

I can't seem to find any Zelkovas on your page.

Norm
 

paddles

Yamadori
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Paddles,

I can't seem to find any Zelkovas on your page.

Norm
:eek: :eek: You're right, its not there. I'll go take a new one tomorrow, old one was pretty old anyway, won't be a good shot tho, its buried in amongst some agapanthas.:)
 

Tachigi

Omono
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Hi Paddles,
Putting it in the ground is OK. It would have been better if you had slipped a piece of tile or flagstone under it. This so the roots grow out from the tree instead of down. I did the same when I first started my growing ground its a common mistake that is made. I would suggest this.....Leave the tree in the ground as long as you like to thicken up the trunk to your liking. Once a year in the spring. Draw a line in the dirt that is your imaginary pot outline. Gently dig down inside your line and root prune those lateral roots. Apply a chopped spagnum moss treatment to the cut ends and recover the roots. While this is not a 100% method for treating the rootball. It is very effective to achieve significant and postive results with out disturbing the tree. I used this technique when I made the same error on some tridents and ended up with a nice nebari on those trees. I also currently use this technique when I collect trees that have long running roots with few fine roots close to the trunk. On the collected trees it just demands a year or two of patienence while those fine roots grow so that it can be lifted out of the ground.

Good luck with your tree!
 

paddles

Yamadori
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Went to take a photo, can't really get one, they just look like blobs of green, I think I'll do as advised, just leave it, although, I might lift it this winter and put a tile under it? its young, so another year or 5 in the ground won't hurt it.
 

zelk

Shohin
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I think you will eventually have a nicer bonsai with a larger trunk if you wait longer. Have you though of spading around the tree to keep the roots cut back?
 

paddles

Yamadori
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I think you will eventually have a nicer bonsai with a larger trunk if you wait longer. Have you though of spading around the tree to keep the roots cut back?
Yes, and in future that's what I'll do, however where it is is not the best space for it to be, I'll move the agapanthas from around it, and because that will invariably disturb its roots, I think I'll take the chance and put a tile under it.
 

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