Japanese maple from seed

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what variety of maple?
 

0soyoung

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At some point, @BonsaiNaga13, you might want to sacrifice a few seeds to see if they really are viable. Maples will make seeds even if the flowers don't get pollinated. Non-viable seeds are hollow - just cut across the axis of the seed. I haven't found the 'floating test' to be reliable (the idea being that if they are hollow, they float; otherwise sink).
 
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They usually aren't true to parent so I didn't bother finding out. but some are red maples some are green

i'm very aware, but you said local trees. Did you mean local japanese maples, or did you collect Acer Saccharum and Rubrum?

I am asking because i live in the land of maples (the leaf is on our flag, not the flag of japan :p) and i have been giving thought to testing out some 'native' maples species, even if just for fun. There is seemingly infinite opportunity to air layer suitable material in unvisited public forests.

I was just curious as to which species you decided to have a swing at.
 

BonsaiNaga13

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i'm very aware, but you said local trees. Did you mean local japanese maples, or did you collect Acer Saccharum and Rubrum?

I am asking because i live in the land of maples (the leaf is on our flag, not the flag of japan :p) and i have been giving thought to testing out some 'native' maples species, even if just for fun. There is seemingly infinite opportunity to air layer suitable material in unvisited public forests.

I was just curious as to which species you decided to have a swing at.
Japanese maple from trees in my area. I thought about trying other maples but I'm gunna start with what I know works first. I also have a few trident seedlings
 
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When did you collect and how did you stratify? I grabbed a number of Acer seeds over this autumn but they got moldy while storing them. Did you let them dry out then soak and stratify or did you cold store them?
 

eryk2kartman

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Nice,

I planted a lot of maple trees this year, JM is already started to germinate.
With the fresh seeds, you dont need to do much, it would be enough if you put them into pot/tray and leave them outside, if you want to put them into the fridge - thats fine that will work also but you need to check them more often.

BTW - i did a test this year and i have to say - the seeds that were planted in last November - they are already germinating, they are about 3-4 weeks ahead of the once in the fridge.
 

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I grabbed a number of Acer seeds over this autumn but they got moldy while storing them.
This is what I found out too. The idea that you chuck seeds in a bagggie in a fridage.. Does not work. Plant them when you collect them Put outside, protect from overly wet conditions and rodents and wait for spring. Nature knows.
 

BonsaiNaga13

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When did you collect and how did you stratify? I grabbed a number of Acer seeds over this autumn but they got moldy while storing them. Did you let them dry out then soak and stratify or did you cold store them?
I'm just experimenting to see what works best, got a few hundred outside in pots, put one seed in some soil in a clear plastic takeout container and put him in the fridge/freezer for 2 months and that's the one that sprouted. The other seeds I just put in plastic bags in the fridge and I'm gunna plant closer to spring
 
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I'm just experimenting to see what works best, got a few hundred outside in pots, put one seed in some soil in a clear plastic takeout container and put him in the fridge/freezer for 2 months and that's the one that sprouted. The other seeds I just put in plastic bags in the fridge and I'm gunna plant closer to spring

Those plastic takeout containers is what im using in fridge. I just ask for an extra lid to put underneath to catch drainage, drill holes in bottom and lay the top on with some holes in that for air flow. Seems to be working... no mold on these, maintaining moisture, and extra water running off no problem.
 

eryk2kartman

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I use cosmetic pads (taken from my wife :) ) and it works as a treat, really easy to control the moisture and you can check seeds really well.
I did some in the soil mix as well just to see if there is any differences

I guess once they are fresh and moist (or soaked) you could just put them in plastic bag with a bit of air and that would work too, the key is to keep them moist not wet.

I think i planted around 2k JM seeds this year (didnt plan it that way:) had a spare bag for friend but he didnt want them at the end, so they not going to be waist - in the trays now....
 
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I've been trying to sprout japanese maples 3 winters in a row. I've tried collecting seeds in August-December. I've tried directly sewing them, I've tried stratification, I've tried soaking them, but not one seed has sprouted. I've cut them in half to make sure they are viable, and they do have embryos. my latest batch came from a tree at a Wendys lol, and is currently in some really fine grit sand. nothing yet, but I'll keep an eye on them as usual.
 

BonsaiNaga13

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This is what I found out too. The idea that you chuck seeds in a bagggie in a fridage.. Does not work. Plant them when you collect them Put outside, protect from overly wet conditions and rodents and wait for spring. Nature knows.
Some of mine got moldy but I dont think too moldy that they wont grow. I've raked leaves in spring and seen maple seeds kinda moldy in the leaves with roots sprouting so I'm going to sow them soon
 

BonsaiNaga13

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I've been trying to sprout japanese maples 3 winters in a row. I've tried collecting seeds in August-December. I've tried directly sewing them, I've tried stratification, I've tried soaking them, but not one seed has sprouted. I've cut them in half to make sure they are viable, and they do have embryos. my latest batch came from a tree at a Wendys lol, and is currently in some really fine grit sand. nothing yet, but I'll keep an eye on them as usual.
They say August is too early and not to collect until the leaves change colors and start to fall off. I dont think sand is a good idea for seed starting. Potting soil or seed starter mix would be best but there's too much salt in sand for seedlings.
 

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They usually aren't true to parent

Right, but this can interesting, leadind to specimens that are original. Many cultivars were originally "chance seedlings".

Might try a fusion depending how many seedlings I end up with.

The pb is that even if they look alike when very young, as you said they don't always come true to the paret trees, and may develop slightly different characteristics.

Those you showed in your last picture seem to be red dissectums, which are cultivars, so there's a risk that they will have different strength or features when they age. That can be a problem if you fuse the trunks.

Plus, I've found out that dissectums are not as vigorous as plain A. p., and more die after a couple of years than the plain species.
 

BonsaiNaga13

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Right, but this can interesting, leadind to specimens that are original. Many cultivars were originally "chance seedlings".



The pb is that even if they look alike when very young, as you said they don't always come true to the paret trees, and may develop slightly different characteristics.

Those you showed in your last picture seem to be red dissectums, which are cultivars, so there's a risk that they will have different strength or features when they age. That can be a problem if you fuse the trunks.

Plus, I've found out that dissectums are not as vigorous as plain A. p., and more die after a couple of years than the plain species.
Yea they look like disectum but I don't remember collecting from any red disectum. Only one disectum that was like 15 feet tall which leads back to genetic diversity. Seedlings from regular acer palmatum might come out disectum. Im happy with whatever sprouts. All my acer palmatum are growing faster than my trident at the moment so I'll see how vitreous they are
 

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