Japanese Maple Help

jps472

Seed
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Houston, TX
USDA Zone
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I bought a house 3 years ago and found a Japanese maple in my front flower bed under a bunch of overgrown plants. It was not doing well so I dug it out and potted. It took me a couple of years to figure out that in Houston you need to place these trees in a completely shaded area. I have always been interested in bonsai and have given a try and failed at growing some in the past. Mostly because I moved around alot and lived in small apartments. I now have a yard and want to invest some time in growing some japanese maples into bonsai. I know this will take make years.

All that said, I was wondering if I could get some advice on whether this japanese maple is worth trying to grow into a bonsai. If so, what would you do with it next? I am conflicted on whether to just let it grow, plant it in the ground, trunk chop it, or something entirely different. I have no idea what is cultivar is, how old it is, or where it was bought.

It is about 1.5-2" thick at the very base. I had to chop some of the top off since it died so it is about 2 feet tall. It seems to have some early signs of a nebari roots but I am guessing it is too early to think about that. Any and all guidance would be great. Thanks.
 

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BonsaiNaga13

Shohin
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It definitely has potential. I'd decide on a style in mind and go from there, u can always look up Japanese maple bonsai vids on YouTube and learn from those. And maybe repot into some bonsai soil in spring to get a good look at the roots and root prune where needed but that's a good looking maple
 

jps472

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Thanks for the response. I have always admired this bonsai. I am not exactly sure what style you call it but perhaps a informal upright and slanting?
 

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leatherback

Masterpiece
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Hi,
be carefull of the roots. I think you may need to layer this. It looks like the trunk is substrantially thinner just above the roots than a little higher up. This is a problem to fix asap. Besides it being a suitable species, it is assuitable as any other young plant without obvious flaws. When working on this tree, work towards getting taper in the trunk, and look for some movement in the trunkline.
 

j evans

Chumono
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WELCOME and good find. You will find lots of help here.
 

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