Japanese Maple in Zone 10

pettiger15

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First of, glad I found this bonsai forum, others I have been on have shut down.

I have read many articles that said japanese maples cannot grow in zones higher than 9, although on my recent trip to N.C. I couldn't resist and had to buy some japanese maple's so I bought 2 to give it a shot. I have one of the Blood good variety and another, I think is a lace leaf type. I brought them to south florida and since last week and so far they are still alive with some new growth and it is currently in the mid 80's F. I have also read some things about dormancy periods. In south florida, we get some days in the 30's and 40's for some short time then it would go back into the 60's throughout winter and occasionally it would get into the high 70's. Is this good enough for winter dormancy or do I need to take any extra steps?

BTW I do have another maple that I have been growing here for years and it does have it's dormancy period naturally.
 

Pine Barron

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What type of maple is the other maple? All maples are not created equal.

I grew the regular green variety in Zone 9 (Southeast Texas) with no problems. I kept it shaded during the summer.

Good luck.
 

pettiger15

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Thanks for the reply. The other is a Crimson Queen. Here are some photos:



 
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milehigh_7

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First put your location in your profile, not all heat is created equal.
 

jk_lewis

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The bloodgood has the best chance of surviving where you live. I hold little hope for the fancy maple.

You won't know how well they'll do until a couple of growing seasons go by. They don't die immediately when moved into a zone that is too warm and that has no winter for proper dormancy -- they just tend to languish and waste away.

Getting your trees from North Carolina may add to the problem; they're undoubtedly acclimatized to a good, sharp, cold season.
 

noissee

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Miramar beach Fl? Okaloosa/Walton County area? Plenty of people grow maples there. Just keep them in the shade for most of the day from now till around November.
 

RyanFrye

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Getting your trees from North Carolina may add to the problem; they're undoubtedly acclimatized to a good, sharp, cold season.

With this in mind I know a nurseryman who has been growing J. Maples here In Central FL Zone 9 since the 50's or 60's. He started from seed and the ones still living to this day have more of a natural tolerance for this growing zone than the others did which eventually died. He propagates them from this stock. He has one that is growing in the ground and has been there since he first opened his nursery. It's huge, easily 20 ft. tall and grows strong year after year. Your best bet would be to find some like this (or I can find his contact info if you want to make the trip...I doubt he ships. He's pretty old school and his nursery is more of a hobby than a business now that he is retiring)
 

pettiger15

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Miramar beach Fl? Okaloosa/Walton County area? Plenty of people grow maples there. Just keep them in the shade for most of the day from now till around November.

No, just Miramar, FL which is on the opposite end. I was talking to a bonsai specialist in Orlando and said that it is possible to grow them in South florida. For some reason he told me to put it immediately in bonsai soil, but am probably not going to yet since they need to thicken their trunk a little more.
 

jferrier

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The heat/sun there will be no problem if given some shade during the hottest part of the day. The real issue will be if you have enough of the 30 and 40 degree days. Mine have always done best after a nice cold winter. Also I've found that the laceleaf, at least for me, seem to ride out the warmer days better than the more broadleaved varieties.
 
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I have just purchased 2 varieties of Japanese Maples for Vero Beach zone 9b / 10a. 1- Coral Bark Japanese maple, and 1 Bloodgood Japanese maple. I have tried before once and learned that there are 3 things that affect these in south florida, 2 of which I can control. 1) sunlight which causes leaf scorch, I can control this by placing this on my covered porch allowing only morning sun. 2) Japanese maples do not do well in our rainy season, this I also will control by having them on the porch. The third area that affects their life here is chill hours. This is what I will experiment with and find a way to get these hours to keep this plant alive here. Any ideas? I was thinking of keeping them trimmed to a reasonable height and then finding cold storage for them for a couple of months to get enough hours to replenish them.
 

Anthony

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Needs at least 6 weeks of cold.
You can use an old fridge.
Ask for minimum temperature needed.

Hackberrys from Lafayette, Louisiana, in the firdge down
here from last week of January, until April first.
Weekly check for water and temperature set at 8 deg,C.
Doing yearly, since 1980

It is said that the maples can live for 4 years with no
winter, but they will eventually die.
Check with Florida Bonsai clubs.
Good Day
Anthony
 

MrWunderful

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I have 10 diff. Varieties of JM in 10b, that are nice and healthy. But I do live in a foggy costal area.
 
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thanks for the info and feedback, there are so many variables to consider when experimenting with plants outside of their comfort zone. I have been able to keep healthy a Jane Magnolia now going on its 4th year and starting to flower now, also Chinese and Japanese wisteria down here as well. This year in addition to the Japanese maples I am experimenting with a River Birch tree, red Bud, and White Dogwood. If these do not do well I will bring them up north to my families house. The reason I do this is to see tropical palms and plants mixed with trees and flowers that would never occur naturally in nature. This year we kept 100s of tulips and hyacinths in a separate fridge for 4 months and they turned out perfect this year! I also am experimenting with a Ceiling Wax Palm! If anyone has been successful in growing some deciduous trees in zone 9b or higher let me know. I will be attaching pictures as the season goes on to show how the trees are adapting to their new environment.
 
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Also, has anyone been successful in keeping a Japanese maple indoors for the extreme part of summer in Florida where the night temps for a few months stay near 75-80?
 

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