Japanese white pine color question

thecarlos808

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Hi I have a Japanese white pine and had some questions regarding the needle color, I know that non grafted white pines times to be a lighter color but I was hoping to get some opinions on the current color of my pine. Also I have a wound on my tree and was hoping to see what the best approach to healing and sealing it would be. Should I clean out the wound and just put some cut past or wood sealant? Thank you in advance
 

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Adair M

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The color of JWP can vary between cultivars, climates, the local water quality, and fertilizer you use. They tend to yellow a bit during the winter. Some are more blue than others. I have noticed that trees that were blue when I bought them in California have turned green once they have been at my home in NorthEast Georgia a couple months.

Does the fact they’re grafted matter? I have about a dozen JWP, some grafted, some not. Each one seems to behave a bit differently. But the cultivar seems to the primary characteristic that determines their color. Well, maybe not! Since I have experienced the change from blue to green on several trees that moved from California to Georgia.
 

Adair M

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About the wound... I’d just leave it alone, and apply lime sulfur. JWP are high mountain trees, and deadwood and Shari are common features.
 

Paradox

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I was hoping to get some opinions on the current color of my pine.

How long have you had this pine and has it changed color to make you ask this?

I have 3 JWP and 2 of them have always been fairly bluish. Last year (2019) one of them started to get pretty yellow in the middle of the summer but it was otherwise healthy.
I fed it some iron supplement thinking it was iron deficiency. This year (2020) it went back to its usual bluish green tinge so I assume I guessed correctly.
 

Yamabudoudanshi

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Hi I have a Japanese white pine and had some questions regarding the needle color, I know that non grafted white pines times to be a lighter color but I was hoping to get some opinions on the current color of my pine. Also I have a wound on my tree and was hoping to see what the best approach to healing and sealing it would be. Should I clean out the wound and just put some cut past or wood sealant? Thank you in advance
I have 2 JWP. One Nasu, and one Ishidzuchi. Your pine looks very similar in color.
Mine tend to go a bit more yellow over the winter and deeper green into summer. Just be 2 cent contribution.
 

thecarlos808

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The color of JWP can vary between cultivars, climates, the local water quality, and fertilizer you use. They tend to yellow a bit during the winter. Some are more blue than others. I have noticed that trees that were blue when I bought them in California have turned green once they have been at my home in NorthEast Georgia a couple months.

Does the fact they’re grafted matter? I have about a dozen JWP, some grafted, some not. Each one seems to behave a bit differently. But the cultivar seems to the primary characteristic that determines their color. Well, maybe not! Since I have experienced the change from blue to green on several trees that moved from California to Georgia.
Thank you for your insight, I remember reading somewhere that grafted tend to be a dark green but that could be wrong. I imagined it would get lighter during the winter, but just wanted to be safe, as this is the first white pine I've owned. Thank you much
 

thecarlos808

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How long have you had this pine and has it changed color to make you ask this?

I have 3 JWP and 2 of them have always been fairly bluish. Last year (2019) one of them started to get pretty yellow in the middle of the summer but it was otherwise healthy.
I fed it some iron supplement thinking it was iron deficiency. This year (2020) it went back to its usual bluish green tinge so I assume I guessed correctly.
I have owned this pine for about 8 months, so it's my first winter with it, the only reason I became alarmed was because I was used to seeing darker shades of white pines, now that I think about it, it has maintained the same shade of green throughout the months that's I've owned it. I will plan to feed next year when time permits thank you
 
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I have one grafted shohin JWP. Compared to My JBP’s it’s very blue. Hasn’t changed in the 8 months or so I’ve had it aside from old needles dropping in the fall.

Edit: now residing in St. Louis, came to me from Rhode Island.
 

sorce

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This time of year, I'd be more concerned with the look of the buds.

Not much environmentally to change Needle Health this time of year.

Welcome to Crazy!

Sorce
 

Paradox

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This time of year, I'd be more concerned with the look of the buds.

Not much environmentally to change Needle Health this time of year.

Welcome to Crazy!

Sorce

I agree if the buds look ok as in its formed new buds for next year and they dont look like they are dehydrating, then the tree is not in dire straights.
However the needle color can indicate a problem that will need to be addressed in the spring. Its something to be aware of for sure.
Either way there isnt much that can be done until late spring anyway as the tree is most likely dormant.

This was the case with my tree. The buds looked ok, the tree was otherwise healthy except for the color of some of the branches.
I had the advantage of the fact that I have had the tree for several years so I know what its seasonal responses are and it had never turned that yellow before.
It returned to its normal dark blue green by the middle of the summer this year so I think giving it the chelated iron early enough before it went dormant helped.
 

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