JBP Cascade Progression - A Tree To Fit the Pot

grouper52

Masterpiece
Messages
2,377
Reaction score
3,725
Location
Port Orchard, WA
USDA Zone
8
I think the last time I posted this (and got slammed by many - :D ), it was on another forum, so I'll post it here now to tart a progression I can add to over time. My apologies if I started a thread on this here before.

My wife wanted this pot I found on eBay, and when it arrived it was my responsibility to put a tree in it. I went to Bonsai Northwest, got three little hunks of black lava rock and a fairly unexciting JBP.

The first photo shows the tree and rocks in the pot three and a half years ago, right after planting. The next few years I tried to put some angularity into that bowed section of trunk, with little luck.

This spring I hollowed out a section of the bow, weakening the heartwood, and bent it down sharply. The photo has been cleaned up a wee bit in photoshop - some changes I plan to make in real life over the next few months. It's starting to compliment the pot well. I'll post again in the spring.

Enjoy.
 

Attachments

  • JBPCascade-406.jpg
    JBPCascade-406.jpg
    46.5 KB · Views: 213
  • JBPCascade-909.jpg
    JBPCascade-909.jpg
    68.6 KB · Views: 263
First of all, I think you're wife deserves thanks. I don't know much about JBP, but the image is coming along. Bark looks like it is developing, and ramification looks good. However, I think I might like another "pool" to "spill" into before reaching the lake at the bottom. Another nice job, especially when the circumstances and quality of material are considered.

-Dave

p.s. I like the wire job, I have found myself using a similar style to what I see here.

-Dave

-
 
First of all, I think you're wife deserves thanks. I don't know much about JBP, but the image is coming along. Bark looks like it is developing, and ramification looks good. However, I think I might like another "pool" to "spill" into before reaching the lake at the bottom. Another nice job, especially when the circumstances and quality of material are considered.

-Dave

p.s. I like the wire job, I have found myself using a similar style to what I see here.

-Dave

-

Thanks, Dave. Yes, this pot was one I liked, but my wife liked it even more, and I think the whole project is one we're both happy with so far. :)

I agree about the need for more foliage development in the middle, and perhaps even a bit less, or more interesting arrangement, down low. That's the main emphasis for next season, perhaps even several seasons. Once the structure gets more where I want it, some needle shortening should refine the image nicely.

Will
 
Major improvements are impressive. But I'm even more impressed with a wife that would encourage you to buy a pot (staggering) and then to get a tree to fill it (ubelievable).
 
Major improvements are impressive. But I'm even more impressed with a wife that would encourage you to buy a pot (staggering) and then to get a tree to fill it (ubelievable).

LOL. It's not ALL hugs and kisses, but she's usually pretty supportive of my obsession. I must say, however, that there are times when a tree gets bought, unloaded perhaps some evening when she's working, put over into a corner of the yard where it is camouflaged with a lot of other pre-bonsai material around it, sits there inconspicuously for months until she asks, "Where'd you get that?", to which I then reply, "Oh, that thing? I've had that for a while now." :)

There are also the trees she commandeers, either to put in the yard, or for me to style the way she wants them. Then are the trees that need hard pruning or some other "radical" treatment, where I learned early on to just wait until she goes to bed or works an evening shift - later she almost invariably likes the results, although she feels obliged to protest for at least a short while. :)

But basically, yes, she's usually very supportive, and often wants to be involved herself.
 
LOL. It's not ALL hugs and kisses, but she's usually pretty supportive of my obsession. I must say, however, that there are times when a tree gets bought, unloaded perhaps some evening when she's working, put over into a corner of the yard where it is camouflaged with a lot of other pre-bonsai material around it, sits there inconspicuously for months until she asks, "Where'd you get that?", to which I then reply, "Oh, that thing? I've had that for a while now." :)

Yes! Yes! Yes! That's me to a tee. My bonsai obession is the only place in our marriage that I avoid full disclosure.
 
Here's an update. And an accidental "inverse" - kinda pretty.

Enjoy
 

Attachments

  • JBPCascade-13.jpg
    JBPCascade-13.jpg
    151.2 KB · Views: 123
  • JBPCascade-13:Inverse.jpg
    JBPCascade-13:Inverse.jpg
    151.5 KB · Views: 97
LOL. It's not ALL hugs and kisses, but she's usually pretty supportive of my obsession. I must say, however, that there are times when a tree gets bought, unloaded perhaps some evening when she's working, put over into a corner of the yard where it is camouflaged with a lot of other pre-bonsai material around it, sits there inconspicuously for months until she asks, "Where'd you get that?", to which I then reply, "Oh, that thing? I've had that for a while now." :)

There are also the trees she commandeers, either to put in the yard, or for me to style the way she wants them. Then are the trees that need hard pruning or some other "radical" treatment, where I learned early on to just wait until she goes to bed or works an evening shift - later she almost invariably likes the results, although she feels obliged to protest for at least a short while. :)

But basically, yes, she's usually very supportive, and often wants to be involved herself.

Lol...I did this when I collected Boyd's bears when my first child went off to kindergarten...they switched from every other day to every day all day...just WEEKS before school started was we notified. I didn't handle it well...lol that being said...he "knows" me well...and has done a head count on bonsai I currently own. So I see some collections of older trees as stumps. And going from there. ;)

As for the pot...it is down right amazing! I always wondered how one filled those tall pots. Now I know...you have done an amazing job so far...impressed all around.

As for my hubby...he commented to a friend of ours as I scavenged his antique shop today...looking for maybe a unique piece one could use as a pot. (No such luck) nothing with drain holes...though...I have a friend who has a drill for making plate glass flowers...and I plan on asking her if she would mind...adding a drain hole if I found something spectacular...and one of a kind. His comment (sorry got off the path there) ,"My wife's now taken with Bonsai." Not in a negative way...so I am hopeful. He will come around...
 
Nice. How big is this tree? Also, the bark has roughed up very nicely in the last 4 years.

Rob
 
This tree looks way better than the last post- great work!

Ditto! Great progression with a not so impressive tree. I'm with Rob too, nicely barked up in just 4 yrs.

I've always wondered about those super deep pots, do you fill the hole pot with bonsai soil, or do you put something like styrofoam at the bottom and have say 5" of soil?

Thanks Will
Chris
 
Thanks, all.

The pot stands 12 1/2" tall.

As I recall, or extrapolate from my usual practices, I probably just filled the whole thing with my usual inorganic mix. I am not someone to re-pot very often, but if I ever want to with this tree it might be quite a challenge.
 
I think more recent updates on this tree might be posted on other threads somewhere, but this where the "Search" led me.

This project is starting - after a number of years of disappointment - to present a bit of hope. A bit less of an eyesore, a bit more of a young lad with promise. Enjoy.
 

Attachments

  • JBPCascade.jpg
    JBPCascade.jpg
    156.7 KB · Views: 65
Nice Grouper.

Bimbling should be practiced by more, excellent results!

Sorce
 
I think more recent updates on this tree might be posted on other threads somewhere, but this where the "Search" led me.

This project is starting - after a number of years of disappointment - to present a bit of hope. A bit less of an eyesore, a bit more of a young lad with promise. Enjoy.

I don't know enough about this "hobby", and I hesitate to trivialize it by calling it a hobby, to offer any kind of critical comments. So, let me put it this way. I like this. I like the way it looks. I'd certainly be proud of it were it mine.
 
Thanks, all. I may do one of two things at this point:

One would be, since the needles are far too long, to let it grow and gain more vigor until the fall, and then trim this year's new growth all the way back in late August - at least on the more vigorous top areas. This forces growth back onto older wood, with increased ramification, and shorter needles are achieved every year it's done. Ultimately it can stress the tree and branches can be lost if it's done too many years in a row, but the branches lost are usually the weaker ones anyway, and the tree looks more natural for having lost them.

The second option would be to wait another year and then do it. :)
 
Back
Top Bottom