JBP contest question

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#1
I didn't realize until after I joined the contest that JBP probably won't do well here, its a bit too cold. I'm still going to try and hope for the best but I was wondering if I might be able to try a different species too? I was thinking about a ponderosa pine, I think they are similar and since they are native I can go collect seeds to start.
I wouldn't expect the ponderosa to be eligible for any prize if by some chance I actually managed to get something decent but I really do want to stay in the contest for the entire time and I'm expecting the JBP to die off next winter.
 
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#2
It all depends on the frost protection you can afford i guess? Ponderosa for small trees from seed doesn't seem like the best choice. I started with some scots pines but they are much slower than JBP the first years, so i discarded them.
 

M. Frary

Bonsai Godzilla
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#3
I would go with Scots pine.
They grow fast.
They have short needles.
They back bud real well.
They like cold.
Way,way better than a ponderosa pine in every way. Ponderosa pines get cool bark. At like 100 years old. Whoopee.
 

Bonsai Nut

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#4
I'm still going to try and hope for the best but I was wondering if I might be able to try a different species too?
I don't want to discourage you from trying other species, but we have to stick with JBP for this specific contest because we are trying to push the boundaries of what is possible with one specific species.

Let's just say you got amazing results with ponderosa from seed - and they looked better than anyone else's black pines. We would be left wondering - how much of the difference is due to your process, versus how much is due to your species?
 
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#5
You would just need to step up your winter protection. I would either build a deep cold frame or an insulated room within an unheated garage or out building. In either case supplemental heat would be helpful to keep the temperature from getting too cold for extended periods of time. I would try for a consistent temp 20° to 35°.

Consider growing JRP. They are more cold tolerant and can be treated like JBP. You would still need to provide winter protection.
 
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#6
I don't want to discourage you from trying other species, but we have to stick with JBP for this specific contest because we are trying to push the boundaries of what is possible with one specific species.

Let's just say you got amazing results with ponderosa from seed - and they looked better than anyone else's black pines. We would be left wondering - how much of the difference is due to your process, versus how much is due to your species?
Makes sense but I think I'll still try some ponderosa, just to compare with the jbp.
Winter protection will be a issue but I do have access to a root cellar, at least for a few.
 

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