JBP potensai

tanlu

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This is my Mikawa JBP and I'm having trouble deciding what to do with it. I'm shying away from a typical informal upright with a zigzag trunk, but it seems like the obvious choice so far. What I want is to create a natural-looking trunk line, something that looks wild, Like Walter Pall's work.

Any ideas are welcome.
 

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Brian Van Fleet

Pretty Fly for a Bonsai Guy
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Here is what I see in this tree; the zig-zag upper portion is not part of the final design for 2 reasons:

1. The trunk starts straight, then has abrupt bends in the top. It is aesthetically more pleasing to repeat lines, form, curves, etc...as the tree ascends. This one starts straight, and should stay straight.

2. The zig-zag upper portion is far too thick and coarse to be final design. This section was meant to be used as sacrifice growth and pruned off later.

ID the branches that are sacrifice (twistie-ties work well) and wire branches that are part of the final design. Let the sacrifice branches grow crazy, and start to build ramification through candle-cutting in the branches that are part of the final design.
 

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biglou13

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here's my 2 cents

first of all, all my JPB's are in growing out stage long term projects. larger trunks.....

i have a many with similar characteristics as your tree, and have spent time thinking about their futures.

I.what i saw was chop above first branches, grow out for many years, in larger pot or ground, one of those branches become first bend in trunk. there appears to be subtle movement in trunk below first branches, i'm looking at that for first design direction. you should see how happy trees are that spend time in colander/air pots/smart pots. then go in ground.

II. force some back budding, to try and get some low sacrifice branches for better taper, or more low branches to choose from, re evaluate for design in a few years

brian's advice is sound (as always) and is a quicker end product.

im guessing tree is 5 ish years old, and has spent most time in pots?
 

tanlu

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I think I know what to do now.. It's different from what Brian said, but he pointed me in the right direction. I've never been a fan of the sumo trunk pine.

I've decided I'm going to let the remaining branches serve as sacrifice branches, while the numbered ones will become the actual branches. Though I'm not sure when to cut where the "x" is. I read it's best to leave it until the desired thickness is achieved.

I'm also considering whether to plant it at different angle at the next repotting after 3 years.
 

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treebeard55

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Your plan has some flow to it, and definitely has internal consistency. As for a change of planting angle, I think a bit more tilt to the camera's left -- just a few degrees -- would enhance it.

Maybe best of all, your own vision for the tree has come into focus. Go for it!

I would leave the sacrifice leader until the trunk is as thick as you want, or very close. Also if it were mine, I'd take off all the sub-branches on that sacrifice and leave just the needles in the last 6-8 inches.
 
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tanlu

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Your plan has some flow to it, and definitely has internal consistency. As for a change of planting angle, I think a bit more tilt to the camera's left -- just a few degrees -- would enhance it.

Maybe best of all, your own vision for the tree has come into focus. Go for it!

I would leave the sacrifice leader until the trunk is as thick as you want, or very close. Also if it were mine, I'd take off all the sub-branches on that sacrifice and leave just the needles in the last 6-8 inches.
Thanks Treebeard, I would have to agree on the planting angle as well.

I've been following Brent Waltson's articles on JBP as best I can.

I'll cut off the sub branches on the main sacrifice branch next year. I already cut off some unnecessary foliage that would've caused reverse taper, so it may be best to let the tree get back its vigor.

What I want is to get some more girth to the lower trunk. I'll just grow out the lower branches as much as possible. Hopefully the excellent drainage provided by the colander and inorganic bonsai soil will aid that.
 
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