JBP Seedlings Going Strong

roberthu

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So I got these seedlings a few months ago from @cmeg1 and it is really vigorous. I didn't do cut candle at all and it is pushing a flush of new growth right now. The candle are really long as you can see from the photos. I want to let it grow freely upright as sacrifice branch. My question is do I only leave the strongest candle in the center and cut the rest off or do I let all of them grow as they are? Thanks.
 

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Nybonsai12

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My suggestion would be to let them grow unrestricted with no pruning of any kind in order for the trunk to thicken. Next spring you may want to consider repotting into a colander and wiring some low movement into the trunk.
 

cmeg1

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So I got these seedlings a few months ago from @cmeg1 and it is really vigorous. I didn't do cut candle at all and it is pushing a flush of new growth right now. The candle are really long as you can see from the photos. I want to let it grow freely upright as sacrifice branch. My question is do I only leave the strongest candle in the center and cut the rest off or do I let all of them grow as they are? Thanks.
This gives pictures too......nothing too early........perhaps though in sone instances........would not touch this season or at earliest in Autumn....if that is priper time.
They want to grow and adjust now.

 

sorce

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Props @cmeg1 . I dig the aura surrounding your operation. Good resource.


let all of them grow as they are?
It depends on what is growing below what we can see.
Weak low needle buds could benefit from an earlier removal, to make them grow.
If you have lower stuff strong as the smallest candles up top, I think they'd do well without removing anything.

Nice.

Sorce
 

roberthu

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This gives pictures too......nothing too early........perhaps though in sone instances........would not touch this season or at earliest in Autumn....if that is priper time.
They want to grow and adjust now.

I have read this article but it was great to read it again and have a deeper level of understanding. Thank you for your awesome seedlings and article!
 

roberthu

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Props @cmeg1 . I dig the aura surrounding your operation. Good resource.




It depends on what is growing below what we can see.
Weak low needle buds could benefit from an earlier removal, to make them grow.
If you have lower stuff strong as the smallest candles up top, I think they'd do well without removing anything.

Nice.

Sorce
That’s a very good way to gauge strength among buds! Thank you!
 

sorce

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Eeeh..
That’s a very good way to gauge strength among buds! Thank you!
Maybe verbally, but there is a "feeling" that should be followed.
I guess there is a numerical order as well.

For me , that long joint is a 100. Where you could remove everything else set to grow next spring and the tree will live.
You have a 75. A 50. And what seems to be a few 25's lower in the mix.

I think as long as what you keep adds up to 100, the tree will live. The more you can leave on, without negatively effecting the design, prevents long, or juvenile needles, long necks, etc., Which at 100 is inevitable.

Needle buds are like a 1, so you'd need one hundred needle buds for it to live. So you basically can't just leave those.

The final tree, or our keeper parts. Is that 100.
The idea is to build the tree using as many points over that as possible, without causing negative design effects.

This is how we can calculate how many years or will take any tree to become something decent.

A tree built with 200 points will take 100 years.
A tree built with 1000 points, will take 10 years.

Every individual design will determine how many points it can be built with.

This is the difference between a "fast" design.
And a "slow" design.

Resorce.

Sorce
 

roberthu

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Eeeh..


Maybe verbally, but there is a "feeling" that should be followed.
I guess there is a numerical order as well.

For me , that long joint is a 100. Where you could remove everything else set to grow next spring and the tree will live.
You have a 75. A 50. And what seems to be a few 25's lower in the mix.

I think as long as what you keep adds up to 100, the tree will live. The more you can leave on, without negatively effecting the design, prevents long, or juvenile needles, long necks, etc., Which at 100 is inevitable.

Needle buds are like a 1, so you'd need one hundred needle buds for it to live. So you basically can't just leave those.

The final tree, or our keeper parts. Is that 100.
The idea is to build the tree using as many points over that as possible, without causing negative design effects.

This is how we can calculate how many years or will take any tree to become something decent.

A tree built with 200 points will take 100 years.
A tree built with 1000 points, will take 10 years.

Every individual design will determine how many points it can be built with.

This is the difference between a "fast" design.
And a "slow" design.

Resorce.

Sorce
It’s an awesome way to put it. Quantified but not really yet intuitive.
 

Shibui

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Groups of candles will quickly thicken that area. That is fine provided you intend to cut that section off at some stage in future but if you intend to keep this section in your final bonsai you should seriously consider removing excess candles. Removing any growth will slow the thickening and growing process but better slow than growing an ultimately crap trunk that does not look good at all.
When removing candles or shoots on pines consider what you want to keep. Try not to keep shoots with long, bare necks because that will limit budding options. Smaller side shoots will usually have shorter bare sections so are better to retain. More vigorous shoots are better for sacrifice branches as they grow faster and larger and you won't ultimately keep those.
 

roberthu

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Groups of candles will quickly thicken that area. That is fine provided you intend to cut that section off at some stage in future but if you intend to keep this section in your final bonsai you should seriously consider removing excess candles. Removing any growth will slow the thickening and growing process but better slow than growing an ultimately crap trunk that does not look good at all.
When removing candles or shoots on pines consider what you want to keep. Try not to keep shoots with long, bare necks because that will limit budding options. Smaller side shoots will usually have shorter bare sections so are better to retain. More vigorous shoots are better for sacrifice branches as they grow faster and larger and you won't ultimately keep those.
Thank you! I am going to cut that section off in the future as I intend to make this one a shohin. The final height should be 8" to 10" from the base of the trunk. Now I think about it, leaving all these buds at the top will also consume a lot of energy which will likely shorten the side buds that I will be keeping for future trunk link and create a more compact structure.
 
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