Jins/Shari on deciduous bonsai: opinions or examples?

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#1
i wanted to start some discussion on this topic, other than to say it simply isn't done. Some broadleaved trees are often shown with deadwood features, but these are usually evergreen species like olives or boxwood. When deadwood is seen on deciduous material it is usually in the form of Uris and other hollows. It seems to me the prohibition against jins and Shari on deciduous trees comes from two basic ideas, one biological, and one artistic.
Firstly, as Japan and most other temperate climates tend to rot wood on deciduous trees quickly, whereas the wood on conifers resists rot a great deal longer. Here on the Canadian prairies however, the cold and drought slow rot on even deciduous trees to the point where deadwood can last for years or even decades.
 
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#2
The second reason I see has to do with traditional Japanese characterization of different tree genera. Rugged, twisting deadwood features suit the rugged, masculine character of a shimpaku juniper, but not the delicate, feminine character of a maple, zelkova or azalea. However, outside of the Japanese cultural context and using different species, could jins and sharis be appropriate at times? What do you all think?
 

my nellie

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#4
... ...However, outside of the Japanese cultural context and using different species, could jins and sharis be appropriate at times? What do you all think?
I think they can be appropriate on the condition they are created with subtlety, naturally discoloring without use of any chemicals. Exactly as they appear in nature!
This is my personal opinion and I follow this on my trees.... But what do I know?
 
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#5
I think if one wants to replicate whats seen in nature, then deadwood of all types is more than appropriate on deciduous trees. just a matter of blending it in and making it appear as if it was done by nature, convincingly and thats not always easy.

I see many oak trees with jinned/stripped/dead branches...although i think this looks great on oaks, as its one of the more rugged deciduous trees, it might not work on a beech

Oak
IMG_4519
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr
IMG_4520
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr
IMG_8328
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

My own Oak
IMG_4552
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr
2016-12-09_05-28-30
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

Beech with hollow/shari
IMG_4420
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr
IMG_4415
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

beech
IMG_4409
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

sometimes the dead wood on deciduous wood even appears to be weather and bleach, although bleached wood on deciduous bonsai doesnt seem to fit most of the time, but in nature it works, guess it also comes down to understanding where and when to apply deadwood techniques

this is a Beech
IMG_4414
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

My own Beech with deadwood
partial defoliation
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

Oak shari
IMG_8338
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

dead branch on oak with hollows
IMG_9610
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

Hawthorn deadwood
IMG_9844
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

IMG_9846
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

Oak
IMG_4324
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

stripped bark/shari on Beech
IMG_4354
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

Oak deadwood
IMG_4459
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr
IMG_4466
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr
IMG_4495
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

plenty more examples
https://www.flickr.com/photos/138823275@N03/albums/72157683583966405/with/34427652731/

Arthur joura jins a part of a branch on this hornbeam....and for me it works
 
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