Juniperus Procumbens Nana Help Identifying an issue

P41NB0W

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Hello all,

I am having a slight issue with my juniper that I was hoping you kind people could help me get to the bottom of. The tree overall looks pretty healthy, nice color, new shoots, all good there. My problem is with the tips of some shoots and even some old growth. I'm aware of the various blights, but I haven't found any pictures that look similar to mine and I'm pretty new to this so I figured I would reach out to the seasoned vets for some advice. Thanks in advance. I have attached pics, hopefully they are of adequate quality.

- P41NB0W
 

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Japonicus

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Your pictures are fine. I would use both approaches, insecticide and fungicide, can't hurt,
but I think it is insect damage on the most tender succulent shoots. Easier to chew on.
Have you done the white paper test? I've seen a couple June bugs, but they can eat any part
a couple years old that's green. Space out the fungicide a couple weeks.
For insects I rotate Malathion with Concern Insecticidal Soap, and for disease control
Daconil with Phyton27 copper spray. Good idea to have separate pump sprayers for either control.
Phyton27 is rather concentrate and should wear gloves, sleeves and eye protection.
 

P41NB0W

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Hello Japonicus,

Thank you so much for your reply. I suspected a minor mite problem just recently. I did the white paper test with no results, however I kept seeing the characteristic webbing which I knocked down, and everyday it would return. I sprayed it with strong streams of water 3 days apart at first to try and control them and that worked for a few days then the webbing would return. I then purchased a product on amazon called grow safe which is an oil based solution that has really great reviews for it's effectiveness on mites. I have done 2 applications of that and have yet to see any webs return. Perhaps this is just old mite damage then? I'm still going to take your advice and cover all the bases with the products you recommended, after all it can't hurt right?

Thanks again,

P41NB0W
 

Japonicus

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Hello Japonicus,

Thank you so much for your reply. I suspected a minor mite problem just recently. I did the white paper test with no results, however I kept seeing the characteristic webbing which I knocked down, and everyday it would return. I sprayed it with strong streams of water 3 days apart at first to try and control them and that worked for a few days then the webbing would return. I then purchased a product on amazon called grow safe which is an oil based solution that has really great reviews for it's effectiveness on mites. I have done 2 applications of that and have yet to see any webs return. Perhaps this is just old mite damage then? I'm still going to take your advice and cover all the bases with the products you recommended, after all it can't hurt right?

Thanks again,

P41NB0W
Be careful of the oils and do not place in direct Sunlight while undergoing treatment with oils.
Some oils linger longer than others, but the foliage should not be discoloured from the oil when
taking out of Sun protected area. It's been years since I used horticultural oil.
If I did again, it would be during dormancy. Neem oil. Spider mites do not create webs I don't think.
You've may've already addressed the issue. Feed it well, and try a premixed bottle of Daconil at a big box store.
Insecticidal soap also comes in a premixed form, or concentrate to save money. If you have more than a few pieces
then concentrate would be best.
 

P41NB0W

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Japonicus,

Ahh, so maybe that was my problem. I sprayed it out of the sun and kept it in the shade for about 24 hrs after application until it dried and then put it back in the sun, the foliage still looked like it did directly after application, and it still smelled strongly of oil. I had some spots that were browning before the oil but after applying it, it seemed to accelerate what was happening.
Thank you for all of your advice! You have been a great help!

- P41NB0W
 

Japonicus

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1 day is not long enough to shade with oil dressing. It magnifies the Sun.
So as a juniper can be dead for all practical purposes and still be green
(not referring to yours) and takes time to “tucker out” it takes time for
damage to show up. Just saying insect damage that has dried out and got
you to the point of reaching out to research, or whatever, just know things
often take time to show up. Yes, could be Sun damage, but I’ve never seen a juniper
with Sun damage. I would’ve expected to see more widespread more even coverage of damaged areas.
Maybe there are and cannot tell from the 2D pics.
Best of luck. Shade it in indirect Sun, a bright area if you can and feed it well.
You hear do not feed a sick plant, but I wouldn’t hesitate to at least use Fish fertilizer.
Water in well with fish emulsion aka Alaska Fish Fertilizer if you have it.
 

bonsaichile

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That is not a mite problem. In a juniper, not all shoots will have a growing tip. Those shoots without need to be removed in order to let sun and air in. All you need to do is to clean up your foliage.
 

P41NB0W

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Thank you both for you're replies! I now have some things to try. :)
 

sorce

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How long have you had it?

Some tips look cut some look a bit blighty.

If the color is good throughout it shouldn't be infested with mites.

Mite webs go from needle to needle on a branch.
Spider webs go branch to branch.

24 hour submerge for mites.

Sorce
 

P41NB0W

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How long have you had it?

Some tips look cut some look a bit blighty.

If the color is good throughout it shouldn't be infested with mites.

Mite webs go from needle to needle on a branch.
Spider webs go branch to branch.

24 hour submerge for mites.

Sorce
Hello Sorce,

I have had this juniper since May, so 4 months now. The webs were from needle to needle, one tip was almost completely encased in webbing for a bit there. I was also noticing some yellowing tips and needles then as well which led me to suspect the mites. The tips that look cut went from brown to crispy and gray and then I pinched them off, in hindsight I probably should have taken pictures before pinching those off. Some of the tips fell on their own. Despite this, overall the tree appears to be in good health. Lots of new shoots and stuff. Until I sprayed with the grow safe which is a product that contains a number of food grade oils and a bit of citric acid, the tips were not turning crispy and falling off, but were yellowing in places. I was suspecting some kind of blight as well but I do not see any of the black fruiting bodies or anything like that upon close inspection. I live in the upper midwest and winter is fast approaching. So I'm hoping to figure this out before then. This was my first tree so I'm pretty noob, I have done extensive reading, but that doesn't compare to advice from experienced bonsai people like yourselves. I now have a yamadori sugar maple too that is doing pretty well. I hope it is not too late for my juniper. Thank you so much for your reply. Any more advice you could give me would be much appreciated.

- P41NB0W
 

P41NB0W

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When I get home from work today I can take a photo of the tree in its entirety. Perhaps that will help give you the whole picture
 

sorce

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Just come with all that prior info first!

Welcome to Crazy!

Sorce
 

P41NB0W

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Hello all,

So here are a few photos of the tree in its entirety. Mostly it looks really good, you can see all the new shoots. I got pretty worried when some of the tips were damaged, welcome to crazy hahaha. I'm hoping it was just due to the horticultural oil applications and not waiting long enough before I put it in the sun. I know the foliage is a bit unruly, is it ok to clean it up at the start of August? I am in zones 4a-4b'ish. It's just a little guy. What do you guys think now that you can see the whole tree? Does it look as healthy as I hope it is?
I'm still pretty noob so I'm trying to get my bearings as far as what looks healthy and what doesn't etc. Thank you everyone, you have been very kind, welcoming, and helpful! I'm glad I joined this community!

- P41NB0W
 

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bonsaichile

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Hello all,

So here are a few photos of the tree in its entirety. Mostly it looks really good, you can see all the new shoots. I got pretty worried when some of the tips were damaged, welcome to crazy hahaha. I'm hoping it was just due to the horticultural oil applications and not waiting long enough before I put it in the sun. I know the foliage is a bit unruly, is it ok to clean it up at the start of August? I am in zones 4a-4b'ish. It's just a little guy. What do you guys think now that you can see the whole tree? Does it look as healthy as I hope it is?
I'm still pretty noob so I'm trying to get my bearings as far as what looks healthy and what doesn't etc. Thank you everyone, you have been very kind, welcoming, and helpful! I'm glad I joined this community!

- P41NB0W
your tree looks fine. take out all the shoots that dont have a growing tip and put it in full sun to stimulate some bacbudding.
 

coltranem

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It is kind of a basic mass produced shape with no real shape or form. Get used to keeping it alive this year and start looking at other trees to get ideas for this one.

I am not sure where you are located but often you can get something larger and cheaper in the landscape section of you local home improvement store or nursery for the same cost or less. Get some more trees to play with.
 

P41NB0W

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It is kind of a basic mass produced shape with no real shape or form. Get used to keeping it alive this year and start looking at other trees to get ideas for this one.

I am not sure where you are located but often you can get something larger and cheaper in the landscape section of you local home improvement store or nursery for the same cost or less. Get some more trees to play with.
For sure, I realized I could have gone that route after I purchased this juniper from easternleaf.com. I fell into the noob trap hahaha. Thanks for the advice! I definitely plan to get more trees! At the very least this tree sparked the flame, and is reaching me basic care, so I'm still happy that I bought it.
Thanks Coltranem!
 

Japonicus

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One of 2 things I would do with this juniper after it survives the Winter...
how will you Winter this? I just mulch my bonsai on the ground (Zone 6)
on the N side of the house under my sunroom, and have to water it infrequently (monthly depending on weather)
again Zone 6, does get below zero. Just starting out though and in zone 4, I would highly recommend to heal it
into the ground and mulch it good spreading mole/vole granules 1st and followed up again on top of mulch,
on a protected side of the house from the general harshest drying wind direction where ice melt/freeze
and ice cycles will not damage you juniper.
 P41NB0W Jun 8 8 19.jpg
The 1st option ^ will begin trunk taper
regardless of how much you grow it out, maybe even going inside the trunk one more node...

2nd, to wire it bottom to top and begin a trunk twist in the direction you spiral the wire
not the opposite direction which loosens the wire. This restricts desired taper, but is easier done when young.
(here's a great lead on wiring many here will point you to
search craftsy.com for Collin Lewis bonsai wiring essentials.
Craftsy = mybluprint.com, and select the search feature
add it to cart though a free item creating an account, bookmark it and play it over and over
and it will help immensely with how to wire properly). If you went with the 1st idea you probably
won't be wiring this for some time. Not this year. Second option just does give the cambium layer
some time to heal now before dormancy.

My guess is that this juniper has not been in this pot 2 years and does not require repotting yet.
That said, you will want to get the tree healthy and keep all the foliage after a repotting to facilitate root growth
and recovery, a couple years down the road. Keep the Solar Pads = fuel for recovery.
I have a shimpaku juniper that was twisted up, vertical, and though it does not have good taper
it does sport good movement. You just have to decide what style you want and where you're going to take this.
I have a procumbens I've had twenty years, kept tallish, and no truck cut backs. The taper is rather non existant
and the trunk unremarkable, sort of boring, but it's the oldest I have in my care. Was purchased somewhat in the
same condition and presentation you have. I've bought I think 5 nursery stock junipers this year,
all cut back already except one that's over 5' tall, that's planted in the ground.
 

P41NB0W

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One of 2 things I would do with this juniper after it survives the Winter...
how will you Winter this? I just mulch my bonsai on the ground (Zone 6)
on the N side of the house under my sunroom, and have to water it infrequently (monthly depending on weather)
again Zone 6, does get below zero. Just starting out though and in zone 4, I would highly recommend to heal it
into the ground and mulch it good spreading mole/vole granules 1st and followed up again on top of mulch,
on a protected side of the house from the general harshest drying wind direction where ice melt/freeze
and ice cycles will not damage you juniper.
View attachment 256712
The 1st option ^ will begin trunk taper
regardless of how much you grow it out, maybe even going inside the trunk one more node...

2nd, to wire it bottom to top and begin a trunk twist in the direction you spiral the wire
not the opposite direction which loosens the wire. This restricts desired taper, but is easier done when young.
(here's a great lead on wiring many here will point you to
search craftsy.com for Collin Lewis bonsai wiring essentials.
Craftsy = mybluprint.com, and select the search feature
add it to cart though a free item creating an account, bookmark it and play it over and over
and it will help immensely with how to wire properly). If you went with the 1st idea you probably
won't be wiring this for some time. Not this year. Second option just does give the cambium layer
some time to heal now before dormancy.

My guess is that this juniper has not been in this pot 2 years and does not require repotting yet.
That said, you will want to get the tree healthy and keep all the foliage after a repotting to facilitate root growth
and recovery, a couple years down the road. Keep the Solar Pads = fuel for recovery.
I have a shimpaku juniper that was twisted up, vertical, and though it does not have good taper
it does sport good movement. You just have to decide what style you want and where you're going to take this.
I have a procumbens I've had twenty years, kept tallish, and no truck cut backs. The taper is rather non existant
and the trunk unremarkable, sort of boring, but it's the oldest I have in my care. Was purchased somewhat in the
same condition and presentation you have. I've bought I think 5 nursery stock junipers this year,
all cut back already except one that's over 5' tall, that's planted in the ground.
Japonicus,

Excellent advice. I plan to train it but have been hesitant to do so since I am so noob. You have given me an excellent place to start! Wire it into sort of an s curve more or less? I am in MN, US. My plans as of now are to put my trees in my uninsulated, semi-heated garage with a small oscillating fan for minor air flow. If I put my trees on the shelves I have close to the outer wall and next to the door it stays about 30 degrees fahrenheit throughout the winter. It can get down to -40 with a wind chill where I'm at and about max -30 without a windchill where im at, so pretty harsh winters. From the description of the tree, supposedly it is a 7 year old tree, not sure how long it has been in the pot. My guess is they pot it right before they ship it since they give you a multitude of options for different pots when you buy it.
Japonicus! I really appreciate all of your help, and I appreciate you taking time out of your day to provide me the most detailed of advice. Thank you!

- P41NB0W
 

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