Just before it breaks...

Gaijin

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That's why he makes the big bucks. With masterful insights such as this.
 

Clicio

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That's why he makes the big bucks. With masterful insights such as this.
In fact I am not hinting that this thinking is absurd nor being ironical about it; and I respect both Master Kimura and the courses from the BE. I have thought a lot about "stopping just before it breaks" and it makes sense with some species of pines and junipers, which have flexible wood that sends some noises before actually snapping off.
I guess with some decades of experience one can feel it when it is going to be too much and stop just short of disaster.
On the other hand we all know some branches will snap, some of them on the hands of very famous bonsai lecturers during a live demo and being filmed.
It happens.
 

leatherback

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I guess with some decades of experience one can feel it when it is going to be too much and stop just short of disaster.
Yes, you can feel internal fibres starting to give, which is the first tell tale sign the branch is reaching breaking point. Wait a few hours to weeks and you can continue bending as the firbers have "set" somewhat.
 

leatherback

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Two weeks ago we started this bend. This was as far as we could go. When we tried last week, we reduced the amount of copper by half..!

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Clicio

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Two weeks ago we started this bend. This was as far as we could go. When we tried last week, we reduced the amount of copper by half..!

The rebar is holding the two points of the bending, right?
Beginning and ending.
Then you bend and shorten the copper wire to hold it.
And then you wait some time and bend more.
How far can you go?
Did you use a thick wire alongside the inner curve inside the rubber wrapping to protect the bending?
 

leatherback

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The rebar is in place to create a stable place for the copper wire. The Yins itself we did not trust for that. So the connection to the trunk is for stability. The wire keeps the bend.

First session brought 90 degree angle from straight. Meanwhile we have bent it to about 60 degrees. This is as far as we want to go; we do not need more. Next step, possibly in spring, will be to do a bend in de other direction bringing the trunk in a compact set of loops.

Indeed, we have a number of thicker wires on the OUTSIDE of the curve, to reduce the risk of a single weak point buckling.
 

Kadebe

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Yes, you can feel internal fibres starting to give, which is the first tell tale sign the branch is reaching breaking point.
As a newbie here... how do you feel that? When tightening the copper wire, do you hold the bend and do you actually feel that the branch is at the breaking point?
 

leatherback

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As a newbie here... how do you feel that? When tightening the copper wire, do you hold the bend and do you actually feel that the branch is at the breaking point?
When making a bend, I try indeed to have the bending part in my hand, which obviously is easier when with more than one person.
Note: The copper wire is used to hold the branch in place. But it is not what (I) use to bend. The bending is done directly on the branch, and a person tightens the wire as you bend.
 

Kadebe

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When making a bend, I try indeed to have the bending part in my hand, which obviously is easier when with more than one person.
Note: The copper wire is used to hold the branch in place. But it is not what (I) use to bend. The bending is done directly on the branch, and a person tightens the wire as you bend.
Thanks
 
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