Kanuma for Pieris

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After I trunk chopped my HD Pieris Japonica earlier in the year, it seems really happy! I have been periodically adding coffee to the soil (as I do with my other acid loving blueberries) and it has been putting on lots of new growth this season.

In the spring I will half bare root it and get it in some bonsai soil. Does anyone add kanuma to their mix for other acid loving plants like Pieris? I was thinking 25-50% kanuma to my mix.
 

Ancient Dogwood

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Using straight kanuma for azalea. Very healthy. Also use rain water. In NJ.
 

Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
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I use acid fertilizer. Has made a big difference in the health of all of my trees. I used to use Miracid selectively on specific acid-loving genera. Now I use acid/iron fertilizer on everything.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

Imperial Masterpiece
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Depending on your water. If you use municipal water or well water that is medium for calcium carbonate content kanuma will help. If your water is high in calcium carbonate, more than 300 ppm as calcium carbonate, kanuma might not be enough. Fir bark and or sifted peat, the chunks not the fines. These will help, as will acid fertilizers, like Mira-acid
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Know the total alkalinity of your water, less than 200 ppn as calcium carbonate is pretty good for most species except carnivorous plants. Carnivorous plants want less than 60 ppm calcium carbonate.

pH is largely trivial, it is the total alkalinity that is important when it comes to horticulture.
 

Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
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Know the total alkalinity of your water, less than 200 ppn as calcium carbonate is pretty good for most species except carnivorous plants. Carnivorous plants want less than 60 ppm calcium carbonate.

pH is largely trivial, it is the total alkalinity that is important when it comes to horticulture.
Our water is so hard I can walk on it :)
 

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