Kojo No Mai cherry that...doesn't apply to the rules: progression thread

Cadillactaste

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Starting a new thread. Just because this will let ones know...I realise I am breaking the rules. This may not be a bonsai in many eyes...and quite frankly. That's okay. I love it...and at the end of the day. That is all that matters. (Thanks to all who talked me into removing the 3/4 straight branch in the back. I feel it improved this tiny tree by leaps and bounds.)
*Edit:
Though this breaks many rules...I do have a cutting from it that I do plan on growing out and chopping and developing a proper taper and see if I can possibly make a Kojo No Mai bonsai that is more in line with the bonsai rules so to speak. Just not on this one.

So...I'm going to start fresh with a few photos. To keep a progression of sorts for this tree here for myself.

First put into the Erin Pottery crescent pot...it sits on a 3' table...for a rough idea how large this was starting out. (2015)
kOJO NO MAI CHERRY FIRST IN ERIN POT.jpg

To my first...(cough cough) attempt at wiring it. You can see from the photo I didn't wire the entire tree. Out of frustration of the wire not holding. For I was not using the proper technique. (2015)
KOJO NO MAI CHERRY 2.jpg

To still not perfect...but understanding the concept of applying wire. (2016) My goal at this time is to grow out that back branch that crosses...follow a similar line as the one in front along side it. And then bring it down a bit once reaching that branch forming a cascade.
KOJO NO MAI CHERRY FINISHED STYLE.jpg

For size comparison...remember this once took up almost an entire 3' table! It's now 9" wide and 12" tall.
KOJO NO MAI CHERRY SIZE COMPARISON.jpg
 
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Cypress187

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You know i must say it, just because a tree can be turned into a bonsai...doesn't mean it should be. hehe :) I love the pot, very cool.
 

Cadillactaste

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This tree came on unusual...with buds slowly emerging to life. Thing is...this was potted in soil that wasn't sifted. So I'm wondering if that also is a cause. Though the Virginia Creeper's roots were impressive planted in the same soil. But, the soil condition was not good with the fines in it. That, or this crazy short mild winter.
image.jpg

I left the door to the greenhouse open taking out sheets to cover landscape when winds were kicking up and it was cold. And it got the blooms so I removed those...but...am pondering if it might be wise to repot and get it into sifted substrate. It's not chugging along like it normally does. Which...makes me feel it might be more important to check the roots planted in that soil with fines not sifted out.
Surprisingly...this isn't unsettling me. It's like...it is what it is. Let's see if we can figure out what's going on. Then, curious what species of tree would make a good pairing for this crescent if this tree steadily declines. I doubt I go with Kojo No Mai again...for I only purchased it for its blooms...and well, I grasp blooms are short lived now.

Thoughts!
 
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Cadillactaste

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Last spring...it was potted into Wee Tree soil. Unsifted with a lot of fines. (Didn't know any better) Now that I see the difference over what I'm sifting...it's night and day difference.
 

GrimLore

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Last spring...it was potted into Wee Tree soil. Unsifted with a lot of fines. (Didn't know any better)
It Wintered and is alive - I really would not suspect the substrate to be a problem. I also would not repot it this year. I think the odd growth you feel you are having is weather and not substrate related. Even when you protect plants unlike me they still react to length of day and crazy changes as we have had all Spring. I would just give it a chance to come around at this point with no concern - it should be just fine ;)

Grimmy
 

Cadillactaste

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Okay...will let it chug along. I was on the wall. It has buds...not yet open...and the other day I seen one starting to. So...maybe it's just confused.

Thanks Grimmy
 

will0911

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Flowers look healthy and so do the buds...might just be lagging due to being repotted last spring. Seems fine just keep an eye on it! Man I love that pot
 

Adair M

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Darlene,

Give the tree a chance. I think it's just fine.

I did expand the picture to look at the buds, and I noticed something you need to know: it's about wiring and bending.

When we wire, we intend on bending, right? Bending does damage the branches cells, and stresses the tree. So it's important to do it in the least damaging way. So, when bending, try to place the bend so that the wire is on the outside of the curve, not the inside of the curve.

Yes, it is harder to actually make the branch bend when the wire is on the outside, but it's protecting the branch from snapping! If you bend where the wire is on the inside, it's easy to accidently over bend, and snap the branch. And the leverage the wire gives you makes it easy to do! I see lots of places where you've placed your bends where the wire is inside the curve.

So, two things: after you have wired, and are bending, try to only bend so that the wire is on the outside of the curve. When wiring, as you wire, if you know you want to put a bend in a branch, plan ahead and position your spirals so that there will be an outside wire at the place where you plan to bend.

You see, one does not "toss wire on"!

Bonsai is wiring, and wiring is bonsai!
 

Cadillactaste

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Just be careful of your watering, and it should be fine.
Thanks Judy...keeping an eye on that as well.

Flowers look healthy and so do the buds...might just be lagging due to being repotted last spring. Seems fine just keep an eye on it! Man I love that pot
I reckon...I guess the last picture in my head was of the wind damaged new growth and blooms. That it looked sickly. Which...was just error on my part. Leaving that door open on such a cold night and this directly across from the door taking the brunt of the wind that came in.

Thanks...the pot is a commissioned pot from Victor Haris of Erin Pottery. Love his pots.

Darlene,

Give the tree a chance. I think it's just fine.

I did expand the picture to look at the buds, and I noticed something you need to know: it's about wiring and bending.

When we wire, we intend on bending, right? Bending does damage the branches cells, and stresses the tree. So it's important to do it in the least damaging way. So, when bending, try to place the bend so that the wire is on the outside of the curve, not the inside of the curve.

Yes, it is harder to actually make the branch bend when the wire is on the outside, but it's protecting the branch from snapping! If you bend where the wire is on the inside, it's easy to accidently over bend, and snap the branch. And the leverage the wire gives you makes it easy to do! I see lots of places where you've placed your bends where the wire is inside the curve.

So, two things: after you have wired, and are bending, try to only bend so that the wire is on the outside of the curve. When wiring, as you wire, if you know you want to put a bend in a branch, plan ahead and position your spirals so that there will be an outside wire at the place where you plan to bend.

You see, one does not "toss wire on"!

Bonsai is wiring, and wiring is bonsai!
Thanks Adair! I had no idea about the trick of bending with the wire on the outside. I do appreciate your sharing that with me.

Thanks for taking an extra close look and finding error and pointing it out as well. That's how we learn!

Okay...will give this one longer to come awake...and water accordingly. Watching my wire on my next tree. (Going to wire that quince come spring I think...which will give me practice on bending and leaving that wire the outside bend.)
 

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I agree with Adair, some of the bends don't match with the wiring, and some of the wiring is quite loose. I don't think thats your problem though. Judging by your posts, you seem to care a lot about your trees, this is a good thing, but you worry too much. I can't speak confidently as my climate is vastly different, but I think you should listen to others and give the tree a chance. Trees won't necessarily bud out evenly until energy has been distributed evenly the year before. Once those buds open and start running, the weaker areas will follow suit and you can rest easy. Or, prune tactfully to redistribute energy. Stop worrying, spring is the best season of the year, enjoy it!
 

Adair M

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Thanks Judy...keeping an eye on that as well.



I reckon...I guess the last picture in my head was of the wind damaged new growth and blooms. That it looked sickly. Which...was just error on my part. Leaving that door open on such a cold night and this directly across from the door taking the brunt of the wind that came in.

Thanks...the pot is a commissioned pot from Victor Haris of Erin Pottery. Love his pots.



Thanks Adair! I had no idea about the trick of bending with the wire on the outside. I do appreciate your sharing that with me.

Thanks for taking an extra close look and finding error and pointing it out as well. That's how we learn!

Okay...will give this one longer to come awake...and water accordingly. Watching my wire on my next tree. (Going to wire that quince come spring I think...which will give me practice on bending and leaving that wire the outside bend.)
Darlene,

I'm sure the info about keeping the wire on the outside of the curve is in the Korshoff book you have.
 

Cadillactaste

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Darlene,

I'm sure the info about keeping the wire on the outside of the curve is in the Korshoff book you have.
Possibly...but, I watched Colin's video awhile back. And didn't feel the need to look up things in a book. And...I've not looked at that book for awhile. I'm curious if Colin mentioned the bending and wire placement. I'm sure he possibly did. I was more focused on application. That I may have over looked it.

Her subject of soil found in the book I believe is outdated. If I'm not mistaken...it mentions sand as a component. Which you really don't hear much of now.
 

Adair M

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i just went back and watched most of Colin's class on wiring over again. He's changed it a bit since his first version, I believe.

There are minor differences between what he teaches and what Boon teaches, but not enough to fight about.

Boon does advocate unwiring small wire and cutting off big wire. And Boon recommends 1 1/2 turns to make an anchor while Colin says one turn. Minor stuff.

He doesn't talk about bending, just application of wire. Perhaps he does so in a paid class.
 
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Cadillactaste

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Darlene,

I'm sure the info about keeping the wire on the outside of the curve is in the Korshoff book you have.
I didn't disagree with you...just said I hadn't read it in awhile. With watching Colin's video if he mentioned it...I over looked it. It makes sense to me...and I'm not discrediting you or your comment about it.
 

Adair M

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I didn't disagree with you...just said I hadn't read it in awhile. With watching Colin's video if he mentioned it...I over looked it. It makes sense to me...and I'm not discrediting you or your comment about it.
I know.

The first time you read something, you might pick up and understand about half of what's there. Once you've had a chance to use the informstion, it's often worthwhile to go back, and study it again. And pick up on some of the stuff you might have missed.

Boon says he expects his students to only be able to remember 30% of what he teaches in an Intensive Class! That's why his program is 3 years long! We do the same 3 classes per year 3 times each. Then a separate show class. Then, there's a test!

Boon must be right on about the 30% part. When I took the test, I made a 90! So, I figure that's 30% each year!
 
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