Korean Hornbeam Ideas Requested

John Ruger

Shohin
Messages
470
Reaction score
0
Just wanted to share with you guys and get some opinions on the overall direction of a Korean Hornbeam.

View attachment 17184

View attachment 17185


The first two were taken this spring and the plan was just to allow everything to grow out again and construct a new apex.

View attachment 17186

View attachment 17187


The last two, were taken just a couple of weeks ago and happily the growth has been strong. Overall, the plan is to leave the top and and side growth alone and allow them to develop. You can see in the one pic that the trunk has a pretty serious back-arch to it and the foot on the right is fairly pronounced. I was thinking along the line at some point of possibly reducing the size of the base-depending on the root structure. Also, I think it can use root work at some point to develop a stronger root spread.

Do you guys see anything different that you would do with the trunk? I'm not planning to fool around with the base for another couple of seasons, but I'm trying to develop somewhat of a plan.
 

rockm

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
9,684
Reaction score
12,395
Location
Fairfax Va.
USDA Zone
7
I think the first photos in each series show some serious potential for a nice sumo "fat pig" kind of design for the tree. You've already got some serious apex growth to use in that design. I'd let the apex stuff go to thicken over the next two or three years, same with lateral branching. Select the best shoots, let them grow unpruned for a few years. Cut back hard to within an inch of the trunk, grow, repeat for five years or so...KH respond extremely well to hard pruning and develop a fine network of ramification with such treatment.
 

John Ruger

Shohin
Messages
470
Reaction score
0
Thanks Loads rockm! And yes, I guess we can call it a "five-year plan" or so. I'm glad you brought up the idea of a sumo. I wish I had pics before the radical changes, but it use to be quite a bit taller.

How about the base? Do you see anything else that you think may work? I'm visualizing flaring out the roots at some point.
 

HotAction

Chumono
Messages
673
Reaction score
4
Location
Syracuse, NY
USDA Zone
5
I'd consider an air layer or ground layer while I let it grow for a couple years.
 

John Ruger

Shohin
Messages
470
Reaction score
0
I think one point to keep in mind is the extent to which the trunk needs to be carved out. Layering it higher on the trunk would at least eliminate such an extensive hollowed trunk.
 

HotAction

Chumono
Messages
673
Reaction score
4
Location
Syracuse, NY
USDA Zone
5
Something like this, and angle it so you can rearrange that severe lean.
 

Attachments

  • virt.jpg
    virt.jpg
    67.6 KB · Views: 64

Brian Van Fleet

Pretty Fly for a Bonsai Guy
Messages
11,731
Reaction score
31,619
Location
B’ham, AL
USDA Zone
8A
Something like this, and angle it so you can rearrange that severe lean.

I'd be cautious about layering where drawn...no roots will will grow from that dead area right in the middle...it would be a risky layer that has a guaranteed area of no growth...
 

John Ruger

Shohin
Messages
470
Reaction score
0
I'd be cautious about layering where drawn...no roots will will grow from that dead area right in the middle...it would be a risky layer that has a guaranteed area of no growth...

Yeah, layering would present a better option without the dead zone.

One option may be following the tree's original path whereas it was much taller. It's one way of maintaining balance between trunk girth and the rest of the tree.
 
Messages
954
Reaction score
2
Location
HELL
my pesonal opinion, would be that the image that keeps getting refered too, should be the back of the tree... From what I can see from the second pic, in you original post, the other side seems to have alot more movement and interest... with that said, the bump jotting out might make more sense...
If possible, can you please post a pick from the other side...
I also, agree with rockm, "sumo" is the way to go... How far the leaves might reduce in size, I am not sure, not as famillar with this kind of tree.
 

John Ruger

Shohin
Messages
470
Reaction score
0
Thank you for your reply Stacy. Here's a shot of the back. The foliage is very dense, so a decent shot is impossible.

View attachment 17204

Also see the second pic. This is from the right side. Here you can see the scar where the apex used to be and where the leaders for a new apex are growing. If I use the back as a new front, then the tree would have to tilt forward about 30 degrees or so (?) in order that the apex wouldn't be situated in the new front.

View attachment 17205

Sorry for the pic quality...hopefully you can make out what I'm refering to.

Also, I really would hate to loose the deadwood from the scar in the front...
 
Last edited:

treebeard55

Chumono
Messages
763
Reaction score
84
Location
north-central Indiana, USA
USDA Zone
5A
... the trunk has a pretty serious back-arch to it and the foot on the right is fairly pronounced. ...

I haven't seen these two options mentioned yet, and I think they're worth consideration, at least.

A) I wouldn't worry too much about the back-arch: if your overall trunk movement (think of it as a vector sum) is not toward the back, the arch gives some 3-D to the trunk movement. You could also, in ref to the second picture attached to your first post, tilt the planting angle about 30 degrees to the right, so that the "arch" becomes more of a "forward lean."

B) Consider emphasizing that foot on the nebari, and turning it into a feature of the tree. :)
 

John Ruger

Shohin
Messages
470
Reaction score
0
Thank you for your advice Steve on both points. It's going to be interesting in early spring when I take a look "under the hood". I poked around yesterday and from what I can see, so far, is that the bulk of the roots are underneath the front half of that "foot" as there is a bit of deadwood under the "heel" so-to-speak.
 
Messages
954
Reaction score
2
Location
HELL
what I was trying to get at, would be something like this...
I think some where in there, it is to be found ???
 

John Ruger

Shohin
Messages
470
Reaction score
0
what I was trying to get at, would be something like this...
I think some where in there, it is to be found ???

I like the idea and thanks for the illustration. I can see how you mean to incorporate the movement of the trunk, yet I don't think it's possible to orient the "foot" as you envisioned.

The leader, as it stands now, originates from the top of the inside of the curve; the outside of the arch is deadwood, except for a rather thin strip of live wood, and probably too thin to support the girth necessary to frow a convincing leader.
 

Similar threads

Top